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Make Performance Management Part Of The Daily Conversation

Make Performance Management Part Of The Daily Conversation

More and more we are seeing a shift away the annual appraisal system. It can be a costly and timely exercise. Where they are done due to process, employees can end up feeling dissatisfied rather than more engaged. Performance management is increasingly deemed to be an ongoing process and not an annual event. An employee can easily go on the defensive when something is brought up at their annual review that was never mentioned to them before. Likewise the employee could highlight issues to the manager, which if given the opportunity could have been discussed and resolved months earlier. Performance management can only truly be effective when it becomes part of an organisation’s and its employee’s daily actions. The new method of performance management is to foster an ongoing culture of informal and spontaneous performance reviews through ongoing feedback, coaching, support and guidance. This can be done in conjunction with a more formal process which will avoid any bombshells dropped by either party at an annual review. It is now rather a continuation of an already ongoing conversation. Pre-requisites of ongoing performance management: Establish clear goals. This should happen at induction and be repeated on an ongoing basis. Coach along the way, identify weaknesses and areas for development, recognise success and encourage conversation. Golden rules of giving feedback: Constructive feedback is always more effective the closer it is to the event. The risk of waiting for a formal review is the possibility of the employee resenting that they were not told earlier and given the opportunity to improve. They could also continue with the ‘wrong behaviour’ in blissful ignorance. Equally positive feedback can reinforce the right behaviour and really motivate staff. Give specific feedback, don’t be vague. Explain the consequences both positive and negative, of doing the job correctly or incorrectly. Is this the right setting, do you risk embarrassing the employee if it is in front of others? Would a private setting be better? The employee needs to know that feedback is provided to develop them, not to punish them. Are they listening? Do they know what is expected of them going forward? Why not check by asking them to tell you what they will do from here on going forward and see if their answer is in line with what you had in mind. If it differs do you need to adapt? Collaboration – Listen Listen Listen! Why does the employee feel there has been poor performance? What suggestions do they have for improvement? Benefits of effective performance management to an organisation include: Hold on to your top talent! Employees including your highest performers are less likely to leave. Employees are incentivised to perform at a high level. Empowered Employees! A culture of employee accountability is fostered. As the employee becomes more independent, learns more skills and takes on greater responsibility the management job becomes easier. Identify problem areas quicker. Poor performance can be identified and improved. Your customer will have a better experience. Employees will be more motivated when they have been coached and received feedback. No matter what terms are used to describe it: coaching, feedback, goal setting, measuring performance, development etc., the common trend is that companies are striving to make performance management ingrained in the daily culture of the organisation and the actions of its employees and management. This may or may not be coupled with a formal annual appraisal system, with or without a ratings system. Either way increased two-way ongoing communication should lead to a more open and honest relationship between a manager and their employee, a workforce that are motivated and understand their role within the larger organisation as well as a more productive and effective performance by the individual, the team and the company. More and more we are seeing a shift away the annual appraisal system. It can be a costly and timely exercise. Where they are done due to process, employees can end up feeling dissatisfied rather than more engaged. Performance management is increasingly deemed to be an ongoing process and not an annual event. An employee can easily go on the defensive when something is brought up at their annual review that was never mentioned to them before. Likewise the employee could highlight issues to the manager, which if given the opportunity could have been discussed and resolved months earlier. Performance management can only truly be effective when it becomes part of an organisation’s and its employee’s daily actions. The new method of performance management is to foster an ongoing culture of informal and spontaneous performance reviews through ongoing feedback, coaching, support and guidance. This can be done in conjunction with a more formal process which will avoid any bombshells dropped by either party at an annual review. It is now rather a continuation of an already ongoing conversation. Pre-requisites of ongoing performance management: Establish clear goals. This should happen at induction and be repeated on an ongoing basis. Coach along the way, identify weaknesses and areas for development, recognise success and encourage conversation. Golden rules of giving feedback: Constructive feedback is always more effective the closer it is to the event. The risk of waiting for a formal review is the possibility of the employee resenting that they were not told earlier and given the opportunity to improve. They could also continue with the ‘wrong behaviour’ in blissful ignorance. Equally positive feedback can reinforce the right behaviour and really motivate staff. Give specific feedback, don’t be vague. Explain the consequences both positive and negative, of doing the job correctly or incorrectly. Is this the right setting, do you risk embarrassing the employee if it is in front of others? Would a private setting be better? The employee needs to know that feedback is provided to develop them, not to punish them. Are they listening? Do they know what is expected of them going forward? Why not check by asking them to tell you what they will do from here on going forward and see if their answer is in line with what you had in mind. If it differs do you need to adapt? Collaboration – Listen Listen Listen! Why does the employee feel there has been poor performance? What suggestions do they have for improvement? Benefits of effective performance management to an organisation include: Hold on to your top talent! Employees including your highest performers are less likely to leave. Employees are incentivised to perform at a high level. Empowered Employees! A culture of employee accountability is fostered. As the employee becomes more independent, learns more skills and takes on greater responsibility the management job becomes easier. Identify problem areas quicker. Poor performance can be identified and improved. Your customer will have a better experience. Employees will be more motivated when they have been coached and received feedback. No matter what terms are used to describe it: coaching, feedback, goal setting, measuring performance, development etc., the common trend is that companies are striving to make performance management ingrained in the daily culture of the organisation and the actions of its employees and management. This may or may not be coupled with a formal annual appraisal system, with or without a ratings system. Either way increased two-way ongoing communication should lead to a more open and honest relationship between a manager and their employee, a workforce that are motivated and understand their role within the larger organisation as well as a more productive and effective performance by the individual, the team and the company.

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What To Do When One Of Your Top Employees Resigns

What To Do When One Of Your Top Employees Resigns

Every company will have to face the reality of losing top staff at some point or another. This is just an inevitable part of the working world. While it is disappointing to receive that letter of resignation from a talented employee, don’t despair; it’s not the end of the world. There are a number of things that you can do to make the transition as smooth as possible for you, your soon-to be-former employee and your team. Don’t overreact While it’s not the news you want to hear, there’s no point in flying off the handle when you receive word of a trusted employee’s intention to leave. It’s not the end of the world. These things happen and you now need to focus on moving forward without the employee. Face to face meeting Sit down with the employee and try to find out as much as possible about their reasons for seeking a move. Maybe there are only a few minor issues, which can be ironed out. A lot can be learned from such a meeting. If there are specific aspects of their role that they are unhappy with then it is useful to know about them so you can implement changes if necessary. More often than not though, people change jobs as they feel that the new position represents a better career opportunity. You may not agree with them but you should always wish them well and move on. Remain on good terms An important employee handing in their notice can come as a bolt from the blue. However it’s better for everyone if you accept it gracefully and wish them well in their future career. This will reflect well on you not only with the employee in question but with the rest of your staff also. If a star member leaves on good terms he/she should at the very least speak well of you and who knows, may even come back to the company one day. Assess how you’ll replace departing staff The temptation with many companies is to get the soon to be vacant position advertised ASAP. This can be a mistake however. Don’t rush into it. Reassess the original job specification. Has the position changed in the time that the outgoing employee held it? Discuss this with the employee and make sure you have a clear picture of the ideal candidate to fill the role. This should give you every chance of getting the best person for the job. Oversee a transition phase When the employee leaves, you will more than likely have other staff picking up extra duties and filling in for them until the position is filled with a new hire. It’s vital that the outgoing employee sits down with the person or people who will be doing this and goes through all the tasks and responsibilities that the role entails. You do not want a situation where an employee leaves, taking valuable know how and expertise with them. This needs to be transferred to staff that will be covering the role before it’s permanently filled. Counter-offers You can only judge each situation on its merits but be wary of making counter-offers to employees in the hope of getting them to stay. Generally people want to go because they see the other job as providing new opportunities and challenges. Offering more money or extra responsibility may not be enough to appease someone who wants a change. Even if they do accept, will their heart really be in the job and will they be looking for a move again a few months down the line. Also, if they do accept, how will their improved terms go down with their colleagues? Losing a top employee is not something that any organisation wants to be faced with. Although undesirable it is not necessarily a disaster. People move on and so do companies. If the situation is handled correctly the departure shouldn’t affect the organisation too much in the long run. Good staff will usually work out their notice period in a professional and productive manner and if they leave on good terms they might even return in the future.

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How Salary Guides Can Help Human Resource Professionals

How Salary Guides Can Help Human Resource Professionals

A salary guide is great for candidates to benchmark their current position in the marketplace but it can also be great for employers and hiring managers when recruiting for open positions in their business. Four reasons for this include: Salary Guidelines Our consultants recruit for numerous roles throughout the year in vastly different industries and areas across Ireland. We use their experiences to pull together realistic salary guideline to help candidates and clients manage their expectations. These figures can be used by clients to help them understand their industry and competitors which will result in hiring valuable employees whose earnings equal the cost of their labour. Identify Trends That Can Effect A Person’s Application For changing industries like IT and the digital sphere where different skills and languages are constantly coming online there is the requirement to understand what is valuable to positions that you are looking to recruit for. Salary guides are great because consultants provide commentary on each industry offering an overview of the marketplace for the reader which will help them when hiring for new positions. Benchmark Against Previous Years No two years are the same and it is the same for salaries and trends. For new companies, or companies entering new territory, salary surveys can be of vital importance when making decisions and preparing hiring and budget processes. Your talent is the most important element of your company so getting this right is your most critical action. It Can Help With Salary Negotiations Knowing the value of a new hire is very important but at some stage an existing employee will come to you asking for a raise and salary guides can help you understand the market value of the skills and abilities that your talent possesses, as well as underlining what added value employees can gain through upskilling into new and improving areas of their trade.

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Questions To Consider Asking In A HR Interview

Questions To Consider Asking In A HR Interview

The HR market in Ireland is experiencing increased growth and movement and competition for top talent is still as fierce as ever. The HR Team in Sigmar have compiled a list of themes and questions relating to them that we have seen coming up in HR interviews over the past year which you may find useful. Culture It’s the hot topic on every employer’s lips. Everyone’s company has a unique culture and every company wants theirs to be a point of differentiation in the market. Culture comes from everyone in an organisation but generally it comes down to HR to communicate and drive the company’s strategy around culture. Here are some of the questions to consider: How do you ensure local and international new hires will be a good cultural fit in your organisation? What traits do you feel would suit your organisation the best and why? What are 3 initiatives you have created to improve employee experience and togetherness? Technology This year saw a huge increase in the emphasis on big data and analytics to understand employee interactions and productivity. HR teams can now use technology to identify areas for improvement and for streamlining workflows which can be used for management reporting, performance reviews and identifying inefficiencies. Asking questions like these below can help identify how future focused candidates are: What improvements have you seen from using HR data and analytics in your company? How has HR data and analytics affected HR strategy in your current organisation? How has HR software influenced how HR communicates rewards and benefits information? Attraction and Retention As the market continues to grow, competition for talent is becoming more and more complex. Once the recruitment process is complete Employee Engagement begins and will be very much the focus of many MNC and SME companies in 2016. Questions to consider for interviews: What innovative or creative talent acquisition processes have you developed and what were the results? What methods have you put in place to engage a very diverse workforce including millennials and older generations on a local and global scale? What unique benefit offerings have you introduced to your company? Performance Management (HPWOs) Having a Performance Management process in place is key to the overall strategy of the company. It increases employee satisfaction and is a predictor of the success of future operational goals. As HR in most cases is aligned with the overall corporate strategy, this is a critical function to get right. That being said it is an evolving process with more companies looking at different ways of monitoring performance. What is your idea of an ideal Performance Management process for a large global MNC? Describe if you ever reviewed or implemented a cloud based solution for Performance Management? What were the pros and cons? What has typically been the biggest barriers to building a collaborative culture that supports engagement, satisfaction and performance to ensure sustainable growth? Market Knowledge Generally candidates will always have questions relating to Stakeholder Management, Cost Savings and how you would see their role developing over the first 3, 6 and 12 months in the job. In addition to this these are a couple of typical questions we are seeing being asked at all levels: What type of candidates do you feel will be most sought after over the next 3 years and how would you attract them? What financial and non-financial rewards do you see as the most valuable in the market at the moment and why? What is your thoughts and experience on recruiting through Social Media?

Meet the HR Recruitment Team

The Sigmar HR team works with candidates nationwide at all levels within the Human Resources space. Placing 200 + HR candidates a year we have Generalist (HR Administrator to HR Director) and Specialist HR vacancies (In-House Recruiters, Learning and Development, Compensation and Benefits, Organisational Development). Our client companies are private and public sector, SME to MNC and all industries. We work interim roles, contract and permanent positions.

As a candidate you can be assured your recruiter is an expert in their field and can advise on job market opportunities, CV preparation, salary bench-marking, interview preparation and offer management.

DUBLIN

13 Hume St, Dublin D02 F861, Ireland.​

39 Fitzwilliam Place, Dublin D02 ND61, Ireland (Sales, Multilingual, Supply Chain)

Tel: + 353 1 4744 600
Fax: + 353 1 4744 641

Email: info@sigmar.ie

CORK 

33 South Bank, Crosses Green,
Cork T12 F611, Ireland.

Tel: +353 21 431 5770
Fax: +353 21 431 6407

Email: cork@sigmar.ie

GALWAY

4th Floor, Dockgate, Dock Road,
Galway H91 PC04, Ireland.

Tel: + 353 91 563868

Email: galway@sigmar.ie

TRALEE

Unit 4, Liber House, Monavalley Business Park,
Tralee, Co. Kerry

Tel: + 353 1 4744615

Email: tralee@sigmar.ie