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HR

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Latest Jobs

The Sigmar HR recruitment team works with candidates nationwide at all levels within the Human Resources space. Placing over 200 HR candidates a year, we have Generalist (HR Administrator to HR Director) and Specialist HR vacancies (In-House Recruiters, Learning and Development, Compensation and Benefits, Organisational Development). Our client companies are private and public sector, SME to MNC and all industries. We work interim roles, contract and permanent positions.

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Salary Guide 2018

Salary Guide 2018

Broadly the global economic performance and Ireland’s position are positive for the rest of 2018. With unemployment at 6.1%, two points lower than the European average (8.6%) and trending closer to 5%, continued inward and indigenous investment along with low inflation, all signals point towards continued, sustainable improvement. Last year we suggested the real impacts of Brexit and the Trump administration may yet to be seen, and this may well still be the case. Ireland has been resilient throughout ten years of turbulence, however, so can be confident of maintaining growth. In terms of professional salaries, increases in the region of 4% have remained ahead of cost inflation and enabled the sustainability of economic (and employment) performance. Indeed the impact of new organisations (mainly financial and fintech) relocating some operations to Ireland from UK will be higher in 2018 due to the time it takes to set up financial operations. The strong sectors (ICT, pharmaceutical, financial, etc.) remain strong, with specialisms like GDPR, Blockchain (not just Bitcoin) and analytics getting the headlines in 2018. There is an on-going drive for a better regional spread for new and existing jobs. There is a salary differential in the region of 5-10% and better retention rates (and more property options), so the regions will be disproportionate beneficiaries of new job creation. 2018 Salary Guides for each discipline: Accountancy & Finance Banking & Financial Services Construction & Property Services HR Insurance IT Legal & Compliance Manufacturing & Engineering Marketing Office Support Sales Science & Pharma Supply Chain

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HR Jobs - Market Overview 2018

HR Jobs - Market Overview 2018

“Businesses embracing HR strategy again to future-proof their business” Thoughts on the Market Not since pre-recession times has the Dublin HR jobs market been this strong, with increasing choice for candidates looking to move. The rest of the country, however, is experiencing a more gradual pace of job growth, while some niche areas of the job market like training and development and talent acquisition are seeing a marked increase. In the capital, it’s a positive landscape for both HR graduates and returning expats, who are being snapped up at the moment. An interesting trend is the big focus organisations are placing on HR strategy. In a strong economy for businesses to compete, their people strategy is key to enabling them to retain employees and out-perform their competitors. This is demonstrated by the prominence of talent management, organisational development, retention and employee engagement on job descriptions from HR business partner level upwards. Senior Roles The volume of senior vacancies and the salaries they are commanding is steadily increasing. However, due to a lack of these roles during the recession, there are multiple candidates applying for these jobs so competition can be fierce. At the senior end, there has been a steady increase in the number of jobs offering between €70-90k. At the 90k + end there are limited options and an active jobseeker in this space will experience long and slow processes. Graduates Getting Jobs Again Gone are the days when you needed a minimum of two internships to get a look in at a junior HR role. Not to say that all graduates are walking into their desired job after college, but there are significantly fewer barriers. Any relevant internships are still an advantage. The key for graduates is to promote their abilities with technology and systems and the flexibility to do the grunt work. Temps HR teams are busy and under pressure. They come under pressure during holiday periods, recruitment ramp-ups and project implementations in particular. As a result, HR teams are taking on temps to ease the burden. Any duration between two weeks to three months is the typical temp time period, with many then rolling on beyond this. Availability for Contracts There are far fewer people readily available for contract roles. So it is becoming increasingly challenging to get cover for maternity and sick leaves. This means your lead in time-to-hire needs to be longer and you need to pay a premium and consider a completion bonus to retain the employee for the duration of the contract. Public Sector Opportunities With public sector employment opening up, there are considerably more permanent and longer-term contracts available. Previous public sector HR experience will mean you are well placed to look for jobs within public sector, semi-State and similar industries. Offers The companies who are securing ‘acceptances’ are being smart. They have quick processes, ensure they are selling the job to candidates and are frequently offering a package above candidates’ salary expectations. In a jobs market where most candidates are securing at least two job offers, the candidate needs to be clear on the reason to choose you. A high offer may reduce the risk of a candidate pursuing additional processes and close out the process smoothly and quickly. Salaries Companies are offering above candidates’ salary expectations in order to secure hires. There has been a significant increase in junior salaries in particular. €28k is the new acceptable graduate salary to live and work in Dublin. Top Tip for 2018 Get diverse industry experience. Industry specific HR demand in financial services, technology, public sector and start-ups. Looking for a HR job? Check out our latest jobs here

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Make Performance Management Part Of The Daily Conversation

Make Performance Management Part Of The Daily Conversation

More and more we are seeing a shift away the annual appraisal system. It can be a costly and timely exercise. Where they are done due to process, employees can end up feeling dissatisfied rather than more engaged. Performance management is increasingly deemed to be an ongoing process and not an annual event. An employee can easily go on the defensive when something is brought up at their annual review that was never mentioned to them before. Likewise the employee could highlight issues to the manager, which if given the opportunity could have been discussed and resolved months earlier. Performance management can only truly be effective when it becomes part of an organisation’s and its employee’s daily actions. The new method of performance management is to foster an ongoing culture of informal and spontaneous performance reviews through ongoing feedback, coaching, support and guidance. This can be done in conjunction with a more formal process which will avoid any bombshells dropped by either party at an annual review. It is now rather a continuation of an already ongoing conversation. Pre-requisites of ongoing performance management: Establish clear goals. This should happen at induction and be repeated on an ongoing basis. Coach along the way, identify weaknesses and areas for development, recognise success and encourage conversation. Golden rules of giving feedback: Constructive feedback is always more effective the closer it is to the event. The risk of waiting for a formal review is the possibility of the employee resenting that they were not told earlier and given the opportunity to improve. They could also continue with the ‘wrong behaviour’ in blissful ignorance. Equally positive feedback can reinforce the right behaviour and really motivate staff. Give specific feedback, don’t be vague. Explain the consequences both positive and negative, of doing the job correctly or incorrectly. Is this the right setting, do you risk embarrassing the employee if it is in front of others? Would a private setting be better? The employee needs to know that feedback is provided to develop them, not to punish them. Are they listening? Do they know what is expected of them going forward? Why not check by asking them to tell you what they will do from here on going forward and see if their answer is in line with what you had in mind. If it differs do you need to adapt? Collaboration – Listen Listen Listen! Why does the employee feel there has been poor performance? What suggestions do they have for improvement? Benefits of effective performance management to an organisation include: Hold on to your top talent! Employees including your highest performers are less likely to leave. Employees are incentivised to perform at a high level. Empowered Employees! A culture of employee accountability is fostered. As the employee becomes more independent, learns more skills and takes on greater responsibility the management job becomes easier. Identify problem areas quicker. Poor performance can be identified and improved. Your customer will have a better experience. Employees will be more motivated when they have been coached and received feedback. No matter what terms are used to describe it: coaching, feedback, goal setting, measuring performance, development etc., the common trend is that companies are striving to make performance management ingrained in the daily culture of the organisation and the actions of its employees and management. This may or may not be coupled with a formal annual appraisal system, with or without a ratings system. Either way increased two-way ongoing communication should lead to a more open and honest relationship between a manager and their employee, a workforce that are motivated and understand their role within the larger organisation as well as a more productive and effective performance by the individual, the team and the company. More and more we are seeing a shift away the annual appraisal system. It can be a costly and timely exercise. Where they are done due to process, employees can end up feeling dissatisfied rather than more engaged. Performance management is increasingly deemed to be an ongoing process and not an annual event. An employee can easily go on the defensive when something is brought up at their annual review that was never mentioned to them before. Likewise the employee could highlight issues to the manager, which if given the opportunity could have been discussed and resolved months earlier. Performance management can only truly be effective when it becomes part of an organisation’s and its employee’s daily actions. The new method of performance management is to foster an ongoing culture of informal and spontaneous performance reviews through ongoing feedback, coaching, support and guidance. This can be done in conjunction with a more formal process which will avoid any bombshells dropped by either party at an annual review. It is now rather a continuation of an already ongoing conversation. Pre-requisites of ongoing performance management: Establish clear goals. This should happen at induction and be repeated on an ongoing basis. Coach along the way, identify weaknesses and areas for development, recognise success and encourage conversation. Golden rules of giving feedback: Constructive feedback is always more effective the closer it is to the event. The risk of waiting for a formal review is the possibility of the employee resenting that they were not told earlier and given the opportunity to improve. They could also continue with the ‘wrong behaviour’ in blissful ignorance. Equally positive feedback can reinforce the right behaviour and really motivate staff. Give specific feedback, don’t be vague. Explain the consequences both positive and negative, of doing the job correctly or incorrectly. Is this the right setting, do you risk embarrassing the employee if it is in front of others? Would a private setting be better? The employee needs to know that feedback is provided to develop them, not to punish them. Are they listening? Do they know what is expected of them going forward? Why not check by asking them to tell you what they will do from here on going forward and see if their answer is in line with what you had in mind. If it differs do you need to adapt? Collaboration – Listen Listen Listen! Why does the employee feel there has been poor performance? What suggestions do they have for improvement? Benefits of effective performance management to an organisation include: Hold on to your top talent! Employees including your highest performers are less likely to leave. Employees are incentivised to perform at a high level. Empowered Employees! A culture of employee accountability is fostered. As the employee becomes more independent, learns more skills and takes on greater responsibility the management job becomes easier. Identify problem areas quicker. Poor performance can be identified and improved. Your customer will have a better experience. Employees will be more motivated when they have been coached and received feedback. No matter what terms are used to describe it: coaching, feedback, goal setting, measuring performance, development etc., the common trend is that companies are striving to make performance management ingrained in the daily culture of the organisation and the actions of its employees and management. This may or may not be coupled with a formal annual appraisal system, with or without a ratings system. Either way increased two-way ongoing communication should lead to a more open and honest relationship between a manager and their employee, a workforce that are motivated and understand their role within the larger organisation as well as a more productive and effective performance by the individual, the team and the company.

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What To Do When One Of Your Top Employees Resigns

What To Do When One Of Your Top Employees Resigns

Every company will have to face the reality of losing top staff at some point or another. This is just an inevitable part of the working world. While it is disappointing to receive that letter of resignation from a talented employee, don’t despair; it’s not the end of the world. There are a number of things that you can do to make the transition as smooth as possible for you, your soon-to be-former employee and your team. Don’t overreact While it’s not the news you want to hear, there’s no point in flying off the handle when you receive word of a trusted employee’s intention to leave. It’s not the end of the world. These things happen and you now need to focus on moving forward without the employee. Face to face meeting Sit down with the employee and try to find out as much as possible about their reasons for seeking a move. Maybe there are only a few minor issues, which can be ironed out. A lot can be learned from such a meeting. If there are specific aspects of their role that they are unhappy with then it is useful to know about them so you can implement changes if necessary. More often than not though, people change jobs as they feel that the new position represents a better career opportunity. You may not agree with them but you should always wish them well and move on. Remain on good terms An important employee handing in their notice can come as a bolt from the blue. However it’s better for everyone if you accept it gracefully and wish them well in their future career. This will reflect well on you not only with the employee in question but with the rest of your staff also. If a star member leaves on good terms he/she should at the very least speak well of you and who knows, may even come back to the company one day. Assess how you’ll replace departing staff The temptation with many companies is to get the soon to be vacant position advertised ASAP. This can be a mistake however. Don’t rush into it. Reassess the original job specification. Has the position changed in the time that the outgoing employee held it? Discuss this with the employee and make sure you have a clear picture of the ideal candidate to fill the role. This should give you every chance of getting the best person for the job. Oversee a transition phase When the employee leaves, you will more than likely have other staff picking up extra duties and filling in for them until the position is filled with a new hire. It’s vital that the outgoing employee sits down with the person or people who will be doing this and goes through all the tasks and responsibilities that the role entails. You do not want a situation where an employee leaves, taking valuable know how and expertise with them. This needs to be transferred to staff that will be covering the role before it’s permanently filled. Counter-offers You can only judge each situation on its merits but be wary of making counter-offers to employees in the hope of getting them to stay. Generally people want to go because they see the other job as providing new opportunities and challenges. Offering more money or extra responsibility may not be enough to appease someone who wants a change. Even if they do accept, will their heart really be in the job and will they be looking for a move again a few months down the line. Also, if they do accept, how will their improved terms go down with their colleagues? Losing a top employee is not something that any organisation wants to be faced with. Although undesirable it is not necessarily a disaster. People move on and so do companies. If the situation is handled correctly the departure shouldn’t affect the organisation too much in the long run. Good staff will usually work out their notice period in a professional and productive manner and if they leave on good terms they might even return in the future.

Meet the HR Recruitment Team

As a candidate you can be assured your recruiter is an expert in their field and can advise on job market opportunities, CV preparation, salary bench-marking, interview preparation and offer management. Contact our HR team by emailing your CV to hr@sigmar.ie or call us on +353 1 4744600.

DUBLIN

13 Hume St, Dublin D02 F861, Ireland.​

39 Fitzwilliam Place, Dublin D02 ND61, Ireland (Sales, Multilingual, Supply Chain)

Tel: + 353 1 4744 600
Fax: + 353 1 4744 641

Email: info@sigmar.ie

CORK 

33 South Bank, Crosses Green,
Cork T12 F611, Ireland.

Tel: +353 21 431 5770
Fax: +353 21 431 6407

Email: cork@sigmar.ie

GALWAY

4th Floor, Dockgate, Dock Road,
Galway H91 PC04, Ireland.

Tel: + 353 91 563868

Email: galway@sigmar.ie

TRALEE

Unit 4, Liber House, Monavalley Business Park,
Tralee, Co. Kerry

Tel: + 353 830407754

Email: kerry@sigmar.ie