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Office Support

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10 Ways To Reduce Workplace Stress

10 Ways To Reduce Workplace Stress

We’ve all got responsibilities such as working and building a career, running a household and/or raising children which can all be very overwhelming and lead to lots of stress. Here are 10 things you can do to start feeling better and minimising stress: 1. Identify causes of stress What triggers your stressful feelings? Are they related to your workplace, children and family, friendships, finances or something else? Once you’ve identified the trigger, you can get down to the root of your stress and find the best ways to handle it. 2. Recognize how you deal with stress Are you using unhealthy behaviours to cope with work or life stress? For example are you using sleep deprivation, smoking, consumption of alcohol or junk food as a means of coping? 3. Get a good night’s sleep A lack of sleep can result in an increase in stress as a person will not be able to stay focused at work. Sleep deprivation also impairs our decision making ability as we are unable to think clearly. Getting 8 hours sleep a night will help improve a person’s health as you will be able to stay alert throughout the day. 4. Eat a balanced diet Hectic work schedules leave us short on time to prepare healthy meals for ourselves and people then have a tendency to grab fast foods. However eating a balanced nutritional diet will help you stay healthy and keep your brain alert. Deficiency in food nutrients such as lack of vitamin B in the body can result in depression and irritability. Also when a person is under stress, vitamins C and E may be lost. 5. Exercise When you exercise, your brain produces “feel good” transmitters called endorphins. Producing these endorphins will help you deal with stress healthily as people who exercise regularly have more energy. 6. Stay organized It is an overwhelming feeling to think that there are not enough hours in the day. Therefore it is imperative that you manage your time. Come up with a daily plan and keep a diary to keep yourself on track. 7. Do not procrastinate Work piles up when you keep on delaying tasks. There is no use putting off for tomorrow what can be done today. 8. Don’t take on more than you can handle at work Avoid creating your own stress by over-scheduling and failing to say no when too much is asked. Don’t overpromise, and give yourself time to finish the things you do agree to tackle. Don’t be afraid to ask for help/delegate if you can’t meet all the demands placed on you. 9. Ask for support Accepting a hand from supportive friends and family can help you persevere during stressful times. If you continue to feel overwhelmed by stress, you may want to talk to a psychologist who can help you manage stress. 10. Finally, treat yourself When you accomplish a personal goal or finish a project, do something nice for yourself. Go out for a round of golf with friends or take a weekend break with your family. Treating yourself between tasks can help take the edge off and prepare you for the next challenge.

How To Answer “What’s Your Greatest Weakness?”

How To Answer “What’s Your Greatest Weakness?”

The one question I am always asked when preparing a candidate for an interview is “how do I answer the weakness question?” The worst reaction you can have to this question is to say I don’t have a weakness. Everyone has a weakness and the reason the interviewer is asking this question is to see how you act outside your comfort zone. People often make the common mistake of trying to turn a negative into a positive. An example of this would be I’m a perfectionist or I work too hard. These answers are boring and show the interviewer you have put very little thought into his/her question. Also you are not actually answering the question you’re just trying to put a clever spin on it.Another mistake candidates make is being too honest. Never mention a weakness that you have if it is going to stop you from getting the job. So don’t answer “I’m lazy” or that “I’m always late” as this is not what your potential new employer wants to hear. The trick to answering this is in the same way you would answer any interview question and that’s by preparing your answer in advance. It can be very difficult to talk about your flaws in a stressful situation like an interview so make sure you spend time preparing your answer. These are a few ways to best answer the weakness question: 1. Pick a weakness that is acceptable for the job Don’t pick a skill or requirement that is on the job spec that you don’t have and say it is your main weakness. This will only put doubt into the interviewers head. 2. Pick a weakness that you can develop For this type of answer you might think of an example where you had a weakness but developed it over the course of your time in prior employment. 3. Describe your weakness in a concise way Don’t go into loads of detail on this question. They are asking you your weakness so be brief and don’t come across as negative. A common answer that candidates often use when asked the weakness question is on their delegation skills. Here you can mention a time when you used to have the mentality that only you could do the job but over time you realised that it was actually slowing the work down and by delegating to other staff members the job was done quicker. This answer is perfect to give but it depends on what job you are going for. If you are going for a managerial role where managing and delegating work will be part of your job description then don’t use delegating as your weakness. Every question in an interview is an opportunity for you to sell yourself, so it is important you never miss a genuine opportunity and the weakness question is no different. Treat it like you would any interview questions that you find hard and prepare your answer.

Office Support Staff In Demand Now More Than Ever

Office Support Staff In Demand Now More Than Ever

The scars left from the financial crisis are still fresh so companies are cautious to offer up permanent roles and are therefore quite open to the option of using temporary office staff on an initial basis. Temporary work in the public sector has seen significant increases where many new roles are project related. As the market recovers employees will have more leverage which will see salaries, benefits and the demand for a more flexible work environment increase. Part-time and working from home options are hugely popular with companies tapping into the older workforce and stay-at-home parent markets, who have huge skills to offer once the companies have the technology to support this. From Sigmar’s perspective, screening candidates for technical and cultural fit is key, before sending candidates to our clients. Testing of candidates at the very first stages of the process ensures that candidates are prepped and ready to move as quickly as employers are moving, to ensure employers obtain the top talent available to them. We may not have returned to the days of the Celtic Tiger just yet, when candidates could pick and choose their next job, but we are a million miles away from the dark days of 2010. Temporary candidates in particular are no longer on the market for weeks, it is now more so a case of days and even hours. Companies need to rethink their recruitment strategies if they wish to secure the best talent otherwise they will be swiftly taken from the market. This is shaping up to be a great year for both employers and employees alike with processes running smoother than ever and appointments being filled quickly and professionally. With the market continuing to improve, we again saw a rise in salaries last year, particularly in the latter end. Competition for talent is continuing to increase which is reflected in salaries for skilled candidates. 2016 saw the return of benefit packages with companies pitching their benefits to prospective candidates, as a way of winning candidates who are in several processes at once.It is evident that salary is no longer the number one factor in candidates’ reasons for changing job positions. Companies are having to map out career plans for new employees at the interview stage making interviews very much a 50/50 process between the employer and the employee. We have also seen an increase in counter offers. Counter offers are something to be aware of when assessing a candidate’s motivations to move. Good news for employers is that at entry level salaries have remained constant. Candidates looking for their first step on the career ladder can be very flexible but will still have expectations of a great work environment and culture. Legislation for temporary workers is at the forefront so matching salaries to that of their permanent counterparts is essential. For candidates when looking for an office role researching the company where you are trying to get a new job is key. While there is a huge pool for companies to hire great candidates from, there is still an expectation that all interviewees will have done significant research prior to their interview. Not knowing adequate information about your potential future employer, is a disappointing reason to not get a job role. Companies invest a lot of time and money on their websites, LinkedIn pages, PR etc. It is expected that you will have researched the company and be able to comprehensively answer the question “why do you want to work here?” with great examples from your research. This can be the decision maker when it comes down to two candidates and deciding which of the two deserve the job. A well prepared answer can demonstrate to your potential employer that you want the role more.

Meet the Office Support Recruitment Team

The office support team is comprised of 12 specialist consultants, 9 of whom are National Recruitment Federation (NRF) qualified and 3 NRF Fellows. Our team has an average of 6 years recruitment experience each. 

We are fortunate enough to have 3 employees on the office support team who have been here since day one of the company.  The team has deep roots and networks within the office and secretarial sector allowing us to maintain the highest of standards for both clients and candidates.  Over time we have worked with people as candidates and as clients.  This aspect of our service is held in the highest regard as we enjoy over 60% repeat and referred business.   

DUBLIN

13 Hume St, Dublin D02 F861, Ireland.​

39 Fitzwilliam Place, Dublin D02 ND61, Ireland (Sales, Multilingual, Supply Chain)

Tel: + 353 1 4744 600
Fax: + 353 1 4744 641

Email: info@sigmar.ie

CORK 

1 Georges Quay, Cork City, Cork T12 X0DX, Ireland

Tel: +353 21 431 5770
Fax: +353 21 431 6407

Email: cork@sigmar.ie

GALWAY

4th Floor, Dockgate, Dock Road,
Galway H91 PC04, Ireland.

Tel: + 353 91 563868

Email: galway@sigmar.ie

ATHLONE

14 Sean Costello Street, Athlone, Co. Westmeath, N37 R970

Tel: 090 641 3973

Email: athlone@sigmar.ie

TRALEE

Liber House, Monavalley Business Park,
Tralee, Co. Kerry

Tel: + 353 (0)66 4012325

Email: kerry@sigmar.ie