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8 Social Media Mistakes that Could Damage your Career

8 Social Media Mistakes that Could Damage your Career

As managers become more tech savvy and social media increases to grow in popularity, it would be foolish to think that your online activity isn't being noticed by those you work with. This isn't to say you should delete all your socials and go live under a rock, but it is important to be cautious about what you are posting. Here are 8 things you should avoid doing if you want to keep your manager happy. 1. Logging on During Work Hours This is a big no no! Most of us have several social media accounts and have notifications popping up throughout the day but it is advised not to check these notifications during your working day. Your employer pays you to do your job and being seen using social media during the day could very easily cost you that job. Check your socials on your phone during break times and avoid social media during work hours especially on your work computer. 2. Using Text Language When you’re used to texting, it can be very easy to use text language in emails without even realising. However, attention to detail is important to employers and it is seen as unprofessional to use text language in important emails. Avoid using words like: “coz” for because “2” instead of to and too “u” for you 3. Posting Inappropriate Photos Everyone is partial to a night out every once in a while, but it’s important to remember on work nights out in particular, to avoid posting inappropriate posts and photos. It may seem like a bit of harmless fun but it could show you in an unappealing light to your employer. Even sharing photos of your friend’s drunken antics could be an issue to your employer. 4. Posting Tasteless Comments Social media is an open platform for all kinds of opinions. However, any comment meant to offend or discriminate will not be accepted by your employer or colleagues. Always be wary of how open you are with your opinions online and avoid posting any malicious or discriminatory comments, as well as sharing content of the same nature. 5. Complaining About Your Job/Boss Online Even if you dislike your job or your boss, you should never post anything negative about your workplace online. Doing this could affect you being hired by future employers. If you need to vent negatively about your job or work relationships, it’s best to speak face to face with someone you trust. You could even consider writing your feelings down on a piece of paper and binning it afterwards. 6. Posting Content About Searching For A New Job Unless your colleagues and employer are aware of your job search, like in an instance of redundancy or you’re in your final weeks of a temporary contract, you shouldn’t go public on social media about your job search. If your employer becomes aware of your plan to leave the company, they are in a position to find a replacement for you straight away. You could find yourself being replaced before you’ve even found yourself a new job. 7. Cyber Bullying This is never ok and it’s seen as a social media mistake in general not just for your career. Avoid any malicious activity with or against any of your colleagues. This could cost you your job and potentially future jobs. 8. Sharing Confidential Information With most employment contacts you sign a declaration to not disclose any confidential information outside of your workplace. It is particularly important to keep private matters off social media. This applies to good information as well. It can be very easy to share good news about your company but often companies like to announce their news publicly themselves. You could find yourself in trouble if you announce information on your own social media before the company wanted to share it.

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Salary Guide 2018

Salary Guide 2018

Broadly the global economic performance and Ireland’s position are positive for the rest of 2018. With unemployment at 6.1%, two points lower than the European average (8.6%) and trending closer to 5%, continued inward and indigenous investment along with low inflation, all signals point towards continued, sustainable improvement. Last year we suggested the real impacts of Brexit and the Trump administration may yet to be seen, and this may well still be the case. Ireland has been resilient throughout ten years of turbulence, however, so can be confident of maintaining growth. In terms of professional salaries, increases in the region of 4% have remained ahead of cost inflation and enabled the sustainability of economic (and employment) performance. Indeed the impact of new organisations (mainly financial and fintech) relocating some operations to Ireland from UK will be higher in 2018 due to the time it takes to set up financial operations. The strong sectors (ICT, pharmaceutical, financial, etc.) remain strong, with specialisms like GDPR, Blockchain (not just Bitcoin) and analytics getting the headlines in 2018. There is an on-going drive for a better regional spread for new and existing jobs. There is a salary differential in the region of 5-10% and better retention rates (and more property options), so the regions will be disproportionate beneficiaries of new job creation. 2018 Salary Guides for each discipline: Accountancy & Finance Banking & Financial Services Construction & Property Services HR Insurance IT Legal & Compliance Manufacturing & Engineering Marketing Office Support Sales Science & Pharma Supply Chain

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20 Things Recruiters Want To See On Your CV

20 Things Recruiters Want To See On Your CV

We asked some of our recruitment consultants to tell us their key tips on what makes a good CV. Here’s 20 things to keep in mind before sending out your CV: ​ 1. Details & Numbers The more detail you give about your work history the easier it is for a recruiter/hiring manager to understand your experience, and know if you are suited to a particular role. Fiona Joyce, Recruitment Consultant, Office Support says “Noting ‘Administration’ for example isn’t enough, you need to include the type, volume, systems used, deadlines/timeframes – go into detail. For example, admin support could be basic paper work (scanning, filing, shredding) or it could be high level admin support (diary/calendar management, correspondence and document preparation, report writing etc.). Not going into enough detail is selling yourself short and letting the competition supersede you.” 2. Specific Timeframes Hiring managers like to see exact timeframes on CVs. Dates on your CV should include month to month time frames, as opposed to year to year. Often people will avoid putting dates on a CV or will try to be vague about the dates. This can look suspicious to employers. It’s better to be honest and give reasons for any gaps instead of trying to hide them. 3. Achievements It’s a good idea to include what you’ve achieved in your professional career. Awards and certificates are very impressive to hiring managers. However, they don’t always have to be job related awards, they can be personal achievements too e.g. completed a marathon, raised money for charity, served on a community or student committee etc. It’s good to show on your CV that you achieve goals outside of work. 4. Key Skills The key skills area of your CV is very important. Alan McLoughlin, Recruitment Consultant, Insurance and Financial Services says, “Don’t just list your competencies. List your skills and beside each one, explain how you gained that particular skill”. 5. Professional Development If you’ve completed any online courses or have studied independently, please be sure to include this information on your CV. Hiring managers love to see this as it shows both an enthusiasm for learning as well as the ability to work off your own initiative. 6. Clarity & Structure Structure your CV so it is easy to read. You can do this by: Arranging your work history and education separately according to date and in chronological order. Keep education and work history in separate sections of the CV. Don’t use borders or tables or strange fonts or pictures/images. Always apply in word format, in standard text form. The formatting should be uniform and consistent If you’re using bullet points, they should all be the same style and alignment You should be consistent in your formatting. If you’re using italics font for each job title and bold font for the name for each organisation you worked for, make sure you do this consistently. 7. Leave Out Graphics & Images Leave out fancy graphics, complicated formatting and decorative pictures where possible. They just tend to make it more difficult for employers to read. Keep things simple, clear and detailed. 8. Visa/Employment Permit Status For foreign Nationals your visa Status is crucial! You must specify what visa you have and if there is an expiry date. 9. Professional Profile – Don’t waffle Your professional profile should be at start of your CV. Use this section to outline your technical expertise, years of industry experience and qualifications etc. Try to avoid saying things like, “I am hard-working and reliable”. 10. Bullet Points Always use bullet points where you can. In your duties section and skills section put the information in bullet points rather than a paragraph. This makes it a lot easier to read and for hiring managers to see quickly and clearly what experience you have. 11. Contact Details You may just assume that sending your CV via email is enough for an employer to contact you but often CV’s get forwarded around and saved on hard drives so the original email you sent could get lost along with your contacts. Always put your email address and contact number on your CV. 12. Targets Achieved Someone with a track record of achieving goals really impresses managers. Setting and achieving targets shows self-motivation and determination. If you have achieved targets in your work experience make sure to include them in your CV. 13. Practical Skills Make sure to list any practical skills like having a driving license, manual handling certificate or fork lift licence. These skills could be really attractive to an employer, depending on the role you are applying for. 14. Tailor your CV to every Job Tailor your CV to the job you’re applying for. Don’t regurgitate the same CV for every job. Use the job specifications to guide what you should be mentioning on your CV. 15. Extra-Curricular Activities If you play sport or music etc. (and you have space on you CV), include your hobbies because they can make you stand out. Alan McLoughlin, Recruitment Consultant, Insurance and Financial Services said “I once read a CV that had “I enjoy hill walking” 3 times. Don’t use irrelevant hobbies when you can use that space for something more useful”. 16. Personal Details – Not too Personal It’s good to show your personality through your CV and give the hiring manager a sense of who you are but some personal details are too personal for your CV. Avoid putting your relationship status on your CV e.g. married, divorced. It’s irrelevant information and it could affect you negatively. 17. Be Aware of Length The CV is a recap, not a life story. Keep it brief but comprehensive. Two pages is the norm, but thres is OK. Conor Ryan, Recruitment Consultant, Construction says, “If you’re running out of space, you’re either being too specific and waffling or you’re going too far back in your experience. The rule of thumb is that you don’t need to detail roles any further back than 10 – 15 years. Your cut off point will depend on how many roles you’ve had.” 18. Balance the Info Make sure you’re giving the right amount of information for each role. You’d expect to see more duties listed for a role that you’ve spent more time in. Always keep the information on your CV proportionally balanced. 19. Tools & Systems You should outline which tools/software you’ve worked with previously as most HR managers will run a keywords search so it is important they are listed on your CV. 20. Double Check Always double-check that the information provided is correct. It’s the last step because it’s always the last thing you do, but it doesn’t make it the least important! You could have followed all the above steps correctly but you left a typo on the first page all because you forgot to double check. Following all the steps but forgetting to double check it could cost you a job. Always double check! We hope you found these tips helpful. If you think you need help with your CV or job searching, you can upload your CV to our website and let one of our 125 specialist recruitment consultants give you the help you need.

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Working & Living In Ireland

Working & Living In Ireland

Relocating to a different country for a job can be both exciting and terrifying. To make your move successful, preparation is vital. If you’re thinking of moving to Ireland, you’re probably asking yourself the following questions: How is the housing market? How do I get a PPS number? How do I to set up a bank account? How do I set up taxes? What transport is available? What is it like to livein Ireland? We have devised a list of what you need to know about moving to Ireland… Accommodation You can look for private rented accommodation through local newspapers, real estate agencies or websites for example: www.daft.ie, www.let.ie, https://www.myhome.ie/rentals. The quality of rental accommodation can vary so you should view the property before making any tenancy agreement. It is common for people who have not met before to rent a house together and to share the costs of the house, including gas, telephone and electricity bills. You usually pay rent monthly, in advance. An initial deposit of one or two months’ rent is also required. PPS Number A Personal Public Service (PPS) Number is a unique reference number for all dealings with public service in Ireland that helps you access social welfare benefits, public services and information. You can apply for your PPS number at your local Social Welfare Office. http://www.welfare.ie/en/Pages/Personal-Public-Service-Number-Registration-Centres-by-Count.aspx You must be already living in Ireland in order to apply for a PPS Number. You will be asked to produce documentary evidence of identity and residence in Ireland. Different documentary evidence will be required, depending on your nationality. To get a PPS Number, you will need to fill out an application form and provide proof of your identity. If you are not Irish, you will need to produce the following documents: Your passport/national identity card or immigration card Evidence of your address, such as a household bill. This should be the first thing you do when you move to Ireland because you will need it to work and set up a bank account. Taxes There are two rates of tax in Ireland: 20% on the first €34,550 earned 40% on the remainder of your salary You will also pay PRSI and the Universal Social Charge on your income. This social insurance contribution goes towards providing State Social and Health Services. You will pay 4% on all your income in PRSI. The Universal Social Charge (USC) is a tax that has replaced both the income levy and the health levy (also known as the health contribution). Rates for 2018 are; Income up to €12,012 - 0.5% Between €12,012 and €19,372 - 2% Between €19,372 and €70,044 - 4.75% Above €70,044 - 8% Bank Account Setting up a bank account in Ireland is often something that is overlooked in the excitement of relocating. Many employers will prefer to pay into an Irish bank account and setting up an Irish bank account can be stressful if you don’t get yourself organised. Things you will need: Proof of Address (Utility bill or Lease Agreement) Proof of ID PPS Number Once you have moved to Ireland and have the above information, choose one of Ireland’ many banks e.g. AIB, Bank of Ireland, Permanent TSB or Ulster Bank and set up your account straight away. Living in Ireland Weather Thanks to the moderating effect of the Atlantic Gulf Stream, Ireland’s climate is relatively mild for its latitude, with a mean annual temperature of around 10°C. The temperature drops below freezing only intermittently during winter, and snow is scarce – perhaps one or two brief flurries a year. The coldest months are January and February, when daily temperatures range from 4° to 8°C, with 7°C the average. In summer, temperatures during the day are a comfortable 15° to 20°C. Healthcare Any person, regardless of nationality, who is accepted by the Health Service Executive (HSE) as being ordinarily resident in Ireland is entitled to free public hospital services but may have to pay in-patient and out-patient hospital charges. You are also entitled to subsidised prescribed drugs and medicines and maternity and infant care services and you may be entitled to free or subsidised community care and personal social services. Social Clubs There is a wide range of social clubs in Ireland catering for all interests. Sport in particular is a hugely popular pastime in Ireland. Some of the most popular sports in Ireland include Gaelic Games, Soccer and Rugby. Below are resources that provide details of clubs and societies throughout Ireland. Localclubsireland.com - directory of sporting clubs throughout Ireland Meetup.com - lists group meetings in cities around the world to help bring people with common interests together and promote the development of active local communities. Search groups of whatever your interest is in Ireland all over the country. Newcomers Club Worldwide - worldwide directory of newcomers clubs for newly arrived expatriates, including Ireland. Transport Rail Service: Iarnród Éireann, is responsible for operating rail services in Ireland. The company operates passenger rail services nationwide and provides commuter rail services, including the DART service in Dublin and the Arrow service from Dublin to Kildare. Bus: Bus Éireann provides various bus services on a network of routes throughout Ireland. It operates intercity coach services and provides commuter services for major cities. City and town bus services are also provided, together with a local bus service throughout the country. For further information on these services, routes and fares see www.buseireann.ie Driving If you have a driving licence issued by an EU/EEA member state you can drive in Ireland as long as your existing licence is valid. It is possible to exchange a driving licence issued by an EU member state or an EEA member state (Norway, Liechtenstein and Iceland) for an Irish driving licence. It is also possible to exchange a driving licence issued by certain recognised states for an Irish driving licence. If you are the holder of a driving licence issued by a country that is not recognised for driving licence exchange, you cannot exchange your licence for an Irish licence. You will only get an Irish driving licence after you have gone through the full driver licensing procedure (see www.rsa.ie for further information). For further information, view our Working & Living Guides: Working and Living in Ireland Working and Living in Dublin Working and Living in Cork Working and Living in Athlone Working and Living in Galway Working and Living in Limerick Working and Living in Sligo Working and Living in Waterford

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Make Performance Management Part Of The Daily Conversation

Make Performance Management Part Of The Daily Conversation

More and more we are seeing a shift away the annual appraisal system. It can be a costly and timely exercise. Where they are done due to process, employees can end up feeling dissatisfied rather than more engaged. Performance management is increasingly deemed to be an ongoing process and not an annual event. An employee can easily go on the defensive when something is brought up at their annual review that was never mentioned to them before. Likewise the employee could highlight issues to the manager, which if given the opportunity could have been discussed and resolved months earlier. Performance management can only truly be effective when it becomes part of an organisation’s and its employee’s daily actions. The new method of performance management is to foster an ongoing culture of informal and spontaneous performance reviews through ongoing feedback, coaching, support and guidance. This can be done in conjunction with a more formal process which will avoid any bombshells dropped by either party at an annual review. It is now rather a continuation of an already ongoing conversation. Pre-requisites of ongoing performance management: Establish clear goals. This should happen at induction and be repeated on an ongoing basis. Coach along the way, identify weaknesses and areas for development, recognise success and encourage conversation. Golden rules of giving feedback: Constructive feedback is always more effective the closer it is to the event. The risk of waiting for a formal review is the possibility of the employee resenting that they were not told earlier and given the opportunity to improve. They could also continue with the ‘wrong behaviour’ in blissful ignorance. Equally positive feedback can reinforce the right behaviour and really motivate staff. Give specific feedback, don’t be vague. Explain the consequences both positive and negative, of doing the job correctly or incorrectly. Is this the right setting, do you risk embarrassing the employee if it is in front of others? Would a private setting be better? The employee needs to know that feedback is provided to develop them, not to punish them. Are they listening? Do they know what is expected of them going forward? Why not check by asking them to tell you what they will do from here on going forward and see if their answer is in line with what you had in mind. If it differs do you need to adapt? Collaboration – Listen Listen Listen! Why does the employee feel there has been poor performance? What suggestions do they have for improvement? Benefits of effective performance management to an organisation include: Hold on to your top talent! Employees including your highest performers are less likely to leave. Employees are incentivised to perform at a high level. Empowered Employees! A culture of employee accountability is fostered. As the employee becomes more independent, learns more skills and takes on greater responsibility the management job becomes easier. Identify problem areas quicker. Poor performance can be identified and improved. Your customer will have a better experience. Employees will be more motivated when they have been coached and received feedback. No matter what terms are used to describe it: coaching, feedback, goal setting, measuring performance, development etc., the common trend is that companies are striving to make performance management ingrained in the daily culture of the organisation and the actions of its employees and management. This may or may not be coupled with a formal annual appraisal system, with or without a ratings system. Either way increased two-way ongoing communication should lead to a more open and honest relationship between a manager and their employee, a workforce that are motivated and understand their role within the larger organisation as well as a more productive and effective performance by the individual, the team and the company. More and more we are seeing a shift away the annual appraisal system. It can be a costly and timely exercise. Where they are done due to process, employees can end up feeling dissatisfied rather than more engaged. Performance management is increasingly deemed to be an ongoing process and not an annual event. An employee can easily go on the defensive when something is brought up at their annual review that was never mentioned to them before. Likewise the employee could highlight issues to the manager, which if given the opportunity could have been discussed and resolved months earlier. Performance management can only truly be effective when it becomes part of an organisation’s and its employee’s daily actions. The new method of performance management is to foster an ongoing culture of informal and spontaneous performance reviews through ongoing feedback, coaching, support and guidance. This can be done in conjunction with a more formal process which will avoid any bombshells dropped by either party at an annual review. It is now rather a continuation of an already ongoing conversation. Pre-requisites of ongoing performance management: Establish clear goals. This should happen at induction and be repeated on an ongoing basis. Coach along the way, identify weaknesses and areas for development, recognise success and encourage conversation. Golden rules of giving feedback: Constructive feedback is always more effective the closer it is to the event. The risk of waiting for a formal review is the possibility of the employee resenting that they were not told earlier and given the opportunity to improve. They could also continue with the ‘wrong behaviour’ in blissful ignorance. Equally positive feedback can reinforce the right behaviour and really motivate staff. Give specific feedback, don’t be vague. Explain the consequences both positive and negative, of doing the job correctly or incorrectly. Is this the right setting, do you risk embarrassing the employee if it is in front of others? Would a private setting be better? The employee needs to know that feedback is provided to develop them, not to punish them. Are they listening? Do they know what is expected of them going forward? Why not check by asking them to tell you what they will do from here on going forward and see if their answer is in line with what you had in mind. If it differs do you need to adapt? Collaboration – Listen Listen Listen! Why does the employee feel there has been poor performance? What suggestions do they have for improvement? Benefits of effective performance management to an organisation include: Hold on to your top talent! Employees including your highest performers are less likely to leave. Employees are incentivised to perform at a high level. Empowered Employees! A culture of employee accountability is fostered. As the employee becomes more independent, learns more skills and takes on greater responsibility the management job becomes easier. Identify problem areas quicker. Poor performance can be identified and improved. Your customer will have a better experience. Employees will be more motivated when they have been coached and received feedback. No matter what terms are used to describe it: coaching, feedback, goal setting, measuring performance, development etc., the common trend is that companies are striving to make performance management ingrained in the daily culture of the organisation and the actions of its employees and management. This may or may not be coupled with a formal annual appraisal system, with or without a ratings system. Either way increased two-way ongoing communication should lead to a more open and honest relationship between a manager and their employee, a workforce that are motivated and understand their role within the larger organisation as well as a more productive and effective performance by the individual, the team and the company.

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Sir Ken Robinson's Keynote Speech at Talent Summit 2018

Sir Ken Robinson's Keynote Speech at Talent Summit 2018

Sir Ken Robinson, one of the world’s leading thinkers on creativity and innovation in the workplace spoke at Talent Summit 2018. As an advisor to Fortune 500 companies and governments in Europe, Asia and the United States, Sir Ken Robinson helps transform organisations’ corporate culture to focus more on fostering and developing creativity. His New York Times best-selling books also help people tap into their creative potential. His ideas and research have made him a popular speaker on TED Talks. In fact, his 2006 and 2010 presentations have been seen by more than 350 million people in 160 countries, making Robinson the most-viewed speaker in the history of Ted.com. Talent Summit was held in the Convention Centre, Dublin on the 22nd February 2018. Founded by Sigmar Recruitment, Talent Summit has grown to become one of the largest HR & Leadership conferences in Europe, showcasing the latest thinking on talent topics from around the world. Its mission is to share thought leadership on talent to build better workplaces and working lives in an increasingly complex world of work. Talent Summit 2018 Speakers included: Sir Ken Robinson - Worlds No. 1 TedTalk Speaker Dr Peter Lovatt - Dance Psychologist, University of Hertfordshire Johnny Campbell - CEO, Social Talent Dennis Layton - Global Deputy Leader, People Advisory Services, EY Karen Ní Bhróin - Conductor in Training, RTÉ Choirs, Orchestras and Quartets David Barrett - Chief Commercial Officer, cut-e Rob Williams - Director of Employer Insights, Indeed Find out more about upcoming events on www.talentsummit.ie

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Salary Guide 2018

Salary Guide 2018

Broadly the global economic performance and Ireland’s position are positive for the rest of 2018. With unemployment at 6.1%, two points lower than the European average (8.6%) and trending closer to 5%, continued inward and indigenous investment along with low inflation, all signals point towards continued, sustainable improvement. Last year we suggested the real impacts of Brexit and the Trump administration may yet to be seen, and this may well still be the case. Ireland has been resilient throughout ten years of turbulence, however, so can be confident of maintaining growth. In terms of professional salaries, increases in the region of 4% have remained ahead of cost inflation and enabled the sustainability of economic (and employment) performance. Indeed the impact of new organisations (mainly financial and fintech) relocating some operations to Ireland from UK will be higher in 2018 due to the time it takes to set up financial operations. The strong sectors (ICT, pharmaceutical, financial, etc.) remain strong, with specialisms like GDPR, Blockchain (not just Bitcoin) and analytics getting the headlines in 2018. There is an on-going drive for a better regional spread for new and existing jobs. There is a salary differential in the region of 5-10% and better retention rates (and more property options), so the regions will be disproportionate beneficiaries of new job creation. 2018 Salary Guides for each discipline: Accountancy & Finance Banking & Financial Services Construction & Property Services HR Insurance IT Legal & Compliance Manufacturing & Engineering Marketing Office Support Sales Science & Pharma Supply Chain

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The Talent Isle

The Talent Isle

There can be no denying that the Irish economy has benefited hugely from foreign direct investment, particularly from the US. The statistics speak for themselves; today there are 700 US companies with Irish operations directly employing 165,000 people. But, the historical economical and political US-Irish relationship works both ways. With Murphys, Kennedys and O’Neills making their presence known in boardrooms the length and breadth of the 50 States, Ireland is well represented in the highest echelons on US soil. Likewise, the statistics on that side of the Atlantic speak for themselves; there are also 700 Irish companies with operations in the US who employ 100,000 US citizens. Recent changes to the political environment in the form of US protectionism has undoubtedly threatened our status as the location of choice for US companies, making up 12.1% of US FDI investment into Europe despite accounting for just 1% of the entire European economy. At a time of green shoots growth in the aftermath of one of the worst recessions the State has known, this hard won reputation in now in jeopardy. Speaking at the Boston College Ireland Business Council symposium, John Harthorne, CEO MassChallenge described protectionism as grabbing the largest slice of the pie. The responsibility of leadership should be to increase the size, not of the slice, but of the pie itself. So, what can business leaders do? Well, of course we can leave it to the Government and State agencies to do their job, or else we can get out there ourselves and deliver the message that Ireland is still a great place to do business. That is exactly what Ireland Gateway to Europe did on Wednesday April 11, 2018, when a delegation of more than 40 Irish business leaders arrived in Washington to deliver the message that Ireland’s trade partnership with the US is stronger than ever, is truly bilateral and that Ireland remains the location of choice for FDI in Europe. Ireland Gateway to Europe met with their US counterparts and political representatives on Capitol Hill with the purpose of strengthening existing business relationships and create new ones. This initiative is a not-for-profit annual trade mission made up of professional advisory firms who travel the US annually to provide a secure resource network for business expansion to help US investment succeed in setting up operations in Ireland. Founded in 2012 as a response to the economic challenges at that time of global recession, Ireland Gateway to Europe is now in its seventh year of US, UK and global trade missions. Ireland has traditionally enjoyed a particularly strong business, cultural and political relationship with the US. However, in light of the recent announcements of trade tariffs, data privacy, immigration and other protectionist policies, our concern is that there may be a perception that Irish-US trade linkages may have subsequently diminished. The fact of the matter is that the transatlantic economy grew stronger, not weaker over the past year, as did Irish -US trade with US exports to Ireland up 9% and imports to Ireland up 6%. While the Washington mission was the focal point of the 2018 trade mission, the second leg of the trip saw the group travel to Boston to engage directly with the US business community at the stateside launch of the transatlantic Boston College Ireland Business Council (BCIBC). Having launched this side of the Atlantic in Dublin last October, the US BCIBC launch took the form of a Global Leadership Symposium where US CEOs met with their Irish counterparts. The event looked at Global Leadership, where a panel of global CEOs discussed how they, as a transatlantic leadership community, can create opportunities against the backdrop of economic challenges. The purpose of the BCIBC is to establish new, and strengthen existing, transatlantic business ties between the two countries, and it is designed to enhance transatlantic business between the US and Ireland through creating connections that allow for entrepreneurial ventures to grow and prosper. The Global Leadership Symposium is one of a series of planned BCIBC CEO Exchange events that will take place twice annually over the coming years, both in Ireland and in the US. The nest event is scheduled for Dublin this coming October. Founded by the Global Leadership Institute, Boston College, and Ireland, Gateway to Europe, and Chaired by Neil Naughton of GlenDimplex, the main aim of the BCIBC is to bring influential business leaders from both communities together once a year in Dublin and in Boston to create one deeply connected transatlantic trade artery. By establishing the BCICB, the tight commercial and social bonds we share with the US can be strengthened and build upon bilaterally, business to business, in spite of any potential external or internal protectionist political policies. It’s widely known that cultural ties between Massachusetts and Ireland are deep but possibly lesser known are the strength of economic ties with 11,000 people employed by Irish companies there and Ireland being the 6th largest exporter from MA. With threats from the uncertainty of the Brexit situation ringing in our ears from the East and murmurings of protectionism coming from the West, Ireland is again in a unique position to act as the economic transatlantic hub. What will the future hold? As it stands nobody knows for certain, but the community of transatlantic business leaders has a collective, critical role to play to ensure the future foundation of business relations is maintained for generations to come. Those business relationships benefit both Ireland and the US. Let’s both grow our slices of the pie by growing the pie itself. Article featured on The Business Post