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8 Social Media Mistakes that Could Damage your Career

8 Social Media Mistakes that Could Damage your Career

As managers become more tech savvy and social media increases to grow in popularity, it would be foolish to think that your online activity isn't being noticed by those you work with. This isn't to say you should delete all your socials and go live under a rock, but it is important to be cautious about what you are posting. Here are 8 things you should avoid doing if you want to keep your manager happy. 1. Logging on During Work Hours This is a big no no! Most of us have several social media accounts and have notifications popping up throughout the day but it is advised not to check these notifications during your working day. Your employer pays you to do your job and being seen using social media during the day could very easily cost you that job. Check your socials on your phone during break times and avoid social media during work hours especially on your work computer. 2. Using Text Language When you’re used to texting, it can be very easy to use text language in emails without even realising. However, attention to detail is important to employers and it is seen as unprofessional to use text language in important emails. Avoid using words like: “coz” for because “2” instead of to and too “u” for you 3. Posting Inappropriate Photos Everyone is partial to a night out every once in a while, but it’s important to remember on work nights out in particular, to avoid posting inappropriate posts and photos. It may seem like a bit of harmless fun but it could show you in an unappealing light to your employer. Even sharing photos of your friend’s drunken antics could be an issue to your employer. 4. Posting Tasteless Comments Social media is an open platform for all kinds of opinions. However, any comment meant to offend or discriminate will not be accepted by your employer or colleagues. Always be wary of how open you are with your opinions online and avoid posting any malicious or discriminatory comments, as well as sharing content of the same nature. 5. Complaining About Your Job/Boss Online Even if you dislike your job or your boss, you should never post anything negative about your workplace online. Doing this could affect you being hired by future employers. If you need to vent negatively about your job or work relationships, it’s best to speak face to face with someone you trust. You could even consider writing your feelings down on a piece of paper and binning it afterwards. 6. Posting Content About Searching For A New Job Unless your colleagues and employer are aware of your job search, like in an instance of redundancy or you’re in your final weeks of a temporary contract, you shouldn’t go public on social media about your job search. If your employer becomes aware of your plan to leave the company, they are in a position to find a replacement for you straight away. You could find yourself being replaced before you’ve even found yourself a new job. 7. Cyber Bullying This is never ok and it’s seen as a social media mistake in general not just for your career. Avoid any malicious activity with or against any of your colleagues. This could cost you your job and potentially future jobs. 8. Sharing Confidential Information With most employment contacts you sign a declaration to not disclose any confidential information outside of your workplace. It is particularly important to keep private matters off social media. This applies to good information as well. It can be very easy to share good news about your company but often companies like to announce their news publicly themselves. You could find yourself in trouble if you announce information on your own social media before the company wanted to share it.

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Salary Guide 2018

Salary Guide 2018

Broadly the global economic performance and Ireland’s position are positive for the rest of 2018. With unemployment at 6.1%, two points lower than the European average (8.6%) and trending closer to 5%, continued inward and indigenous investment along with low inflation, all signals point towards continued, sustainable improvement. Last year we suggested the real impacts of Brexit and the Trump administration may yet to be seen, and this may well still be the case. Ireland has been resilient throughout ten years of turbulence, however, so can be confident of maintaining growth. In terms of professional salaries, increases in the region of 4% have remained ahead of cost inflation and enabled the sustainability of economic (and employment) performance. Indeed the impact of new organisations (mainly financial and fintech) relocating some operations to Ireland from UK will be higher in 2018 due to the time it takes to set up financial operations. The strong sectors (ICT, pharmaceutical, financial, etc.) remain strong, with specialisms like GDPR, Blockchain (not just Bitcoin) and analytics getting the headlines in 2018. There is an on-going drive for a better regional spread for new and existing jobs. There is a salary differential in the region of 5-10% and better retention rates (and more property options), so the regions will be disproportionate beneficiaries of new job creation. 2018 Salary Guides for each discipline: Accountancy & Finance Banking & Financial Services Construction & Property Services HR Insurance IT Legal & Compliance Manufacturing & Engineering Marketing Office Support Sales Science & Pharma Supply Chain

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What you Need to Consider Before Changing your Career

What you Need to Consider Before Changing your Career

Changing career takes a considerable amount of commitment and determination. If you feel that you want to change careers, ask yourself these 10 questions to see if a career change is right for you… What Do You Want? Self-assessment is the first step in making any big life decision. The only way to make an informed decision about a career change is to learn about yourself first. Understanding you and your work-related values, interests, personality type and aptitudes will help you know exactly what it is you want. Do You Have What It Takes? If you’re interested in pursuing a new career, you need to do your research. Look at the job market, understand what hiring managers want, what the expectations are and the skills you need. It is important to recognise what is expected before diving right in. It’s important to note that you may also be expected to work unpaid, in an interning capacity, until you gain enough experience. What Can You Offer? If you choose this new career what exactly is it that you can bring to the table? Do you have transferable skills or industry knowledge? If not, you may need to return to education before you can move into this new field. Who Do You Know Who Can Help? Even though you want a career change, the network you’ve made in your current role could help. Look at who you know and see if anyone has advice in the industry you’re interested in. LinkedIn is a great place to start. Is There Long-Term Prospects? Can you go far with this career? Changing career is a big step and you need to figure out in advance if it is worth it. Ask yourself where you see yourself in 5 years with this career and 10 years and so on. If the career path isn’t clear, you may need to reconsider. Is This A Good Time? Timing is everything. You need to take a look at where you are in your life and decide whether changing careers is feasible. It’s a huge commitment, so you need to be sure the timing is right as well as the career. Is It Affordable? Changing careers may involve taking a pay cut. You could have 10 years’ experience working, but if it’s not in the field you’re going into you can’t expect to be on the same salary. Can you afford to earn less or even nothing at all, because you may be required to do an unpaid internship? This is probably the most important question of them all but it’s important to remember that higher earnings don't necessarily mean job satisfaction. Do You Have Your Family & Friends Support? Having the support of your family and friends can be crucial in succeeding with a career change. Having that bit of encouragement can really help. Also, it’s important to listen to the people close to you. If your family and friends aren’t being supportive of your decision, you may be making the wrong one. Are You Willing To Return to Education? Qualifications aren’t everything but they are important to hiring mangers. If you don’t have transferable skills and industry experience, returning to education may be the only way to move into a new career. Are Your Expectations Realistic? Weigh up the facts. Can you really do this? Talk it through with someone you trust. Sometimes when you really want something it’s easy to get carried away in excitement. Don’t rush into it and make sure the change is possible. Transitioning to a new career is difficult, but if you are confident it’s the right decision for you and you persevere, you should have no trouble succeeding.

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10 Signs You Are A Successful Person

10 Signs You Are A Successful Person

There are times in every person’s life when you feel inadequate, like what you do doesn't amount to much. It's very easy to criticise yourself and become clouded from your successes, but it's important to take the time to appreciate your accomplishments. You could already be successful and you just don't know it. Here are 10 signs that you are a successful person.. 1. You Love To Learn You have a burning desire to learn new things and improve on the things you already know. People who have an ambition to learn are most likely to succeed in life. Successful people never stop learning. If you enjoy upskilling and applying your new knowledge to your work and personal life, it’s a sign you are a successful person. 2. You Plan Ahead You like to structure your future. Making plans and setting goals is something you enjoy doing. Even setting small goals like a bed time shows you are determined and a go getter. Successful people always plan and achieve targets. 3. You Make Friends Easily You find it easy to get along with people and you always find people have good things to say about you. It may be hard to believe but sometimes just being a likeable person can get you very far in life. Kindness goes a long way and it can bring you all kinds of success in life. 4. You Have A Desire To Help People Helping people is something you do instinctively. You empathise with those around you and always offer a helping hand or a listening ear. Sometimes it’s not all about your successes but helping others to be successful. Helping others, in turn makes you a successful person. 5. You’ve Failed, But You’ve Kept Going You do your best to achieve something and when it doesn’t go your way you don’t give up. Being a successful person doesn’t mean that you are always achieving. Sometimes things go wrong, but it’s how you react that is the key to whether you are successful or not. Everyone makes mistakes and fails but it’s those who never stop trying, they’re the really successful ones. 6. You Understand The Power Of No You manage expectations well and know when you need to say no. A lot of unsuccessful people have a bad habit of trying to do everything themselves and never turn down any requests. Successful people understand that not everything is a priority and not everything can be done at once. Successful people know how to manage other people’s expectations of them. 7. You Wake Up Early You wake up early and sometimes even before your alarm clock goes off. “The early bird catches the worm” is the age old saying, but it’s still very true. Getting up early means you’re a go getter. Lazy people aren’t successful, people who get up and go are. 8. You’re Not Afraid To Ask For Help You know asking for help is a sign of strength and not a sign of weakness. Successful people know that it’s impossible to achieve everything by themselves. They know that sometimes it’s ok to ask people for their expertise. Getting help from someone else is also a great way to learn for future success. 9. You Know How To Manage Your Time Sometimes your work load can be very demanding but you know how to prioritise and divide your time effectively between your tasks. A truly successful person understands his/her workload and can prioritise what is to be done in an efficient way. 10. You Don’t Criticise, Condemn Or Complain Even when you are achieving your goals and feel like you’re becoming more successful, you never criticise other people and their work. You encouarge others to be successful too. No one can accept and approve of everything. There will be times when you won’t be able to accept/approve of other people’s work, but you know how to communicate and give constructive feedback. Successful people don’t put others down. Next time you're not feeling very positive about the work you do, make sure to remind yourself of these 10 things. You have what it takes to be successful, all that's missing may be your self-confidence.

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Make Performance Management Part Of The Daily Conversation

Make Performance Management Part Of The Daily Conversation

More and more we are seeing a shift away the annual appraisal system. It can be a costly and timely exercise. Where they are done due to process, employees can end up feeling dissatisfied rather than more engaged. Performance management is increasingly deemed to be an ongoing process and not an annual event. An employee can easily go on the defensive when something is brought up at their annual review that was never mentioned to them before. Likewise the employee could highlight issues to the manager, which if given the opportunity could have been discussed and resolved months earlier. Performance management can only truly be effective when it becomes part of an organisation’s and its employee’s daily actions. The new method of performance management is to foster an ongoing culture of informal and spontaneous performance reviews through ongoing feedback, coaching, support and guidance. This can be done in conjunction with a more formal process which will avoid any bombshells dropped by either party at an annual review. It is now rather a continuation of an already ongoing conversation. Pre-requisites of ongoing performance management: Establish clear goals. This should happen at induction and be repeated on an ongoing basis. Coach along the way, identify weaknesses and areas for development, recognise success and encourage conversation. Golden rules of giving feedback: Constructive feedback is always more effective the closer it is to the event. The risk of waiting for a formal review is the possibility of the employee resenting that they were not told earlier and given the opportunity to improve. They could also continue with the ‘wrong behaviour’ in blissful ignorance. Equally positive feedback can reinforce the right behaviour and really motivate staff. Give specific feedback, don’t be vague. Explain the consequences both positive and negative, of doing the job correctly or incorrectly. Is this the right setting, do you risk embarrassing the employee if it is in front of others? Would a private setting be better? The employee needs to know that feedback is provided to develop them, not to punish them. Are they listening? Do they know what is expected of them going forward? Why not check by asking them to tell you what they will do from here on going forward and see if their answer is in line with what you had in mind. If it differs do you need to adapt? Collaboration – Listen Listen Listen! Why does the employee feel there has been poor performance? What suggestions do they have for improvement? Benefits of effective performance management to an organisation include: Hold on to your top talent! Employees including your highest performers are less likely to leave. Employees are incentivised to perform at a high level. Empowered Employees! A culture of employee accountability is fostered. As the employee becomes more independent, learns more skills and takes on greater responsibility the management job becomes easier. Identify problem areas quicker. Poor performance can be identified and improved. Your customer will have a better experience. Employees will be more motivated when they have been coached and received feedback. No matter what terms are used to describe it: coaching, feedback, goal setting, measuring performance, development etc., the common trend is that companies are striving to make performance management ingrained in the daily culture of the organisation and the actions of its employees and management. This may or may not be coupled with a formal annual appraisal system, with or without a ratings system. Either way increased two-way ongoing communication should lead to a more open and honest relationship between a manager and their employee, a workforce that are motivated and understand their role within the larger organisation as well as a more productive and effective performance by the individual, the team and the company. More and more we are seeing a shift away the annual appraisal system. It can be a costly and timely exercise. Where they are done due to process, employees can end up feeling dissatisfied rather than more engaged. Performance management is increasingly deemed to be an ongoing process and not an annual event. An employee can easily go on the defensive when something is brought up at their annual review that was never mentioned to them before. Likewise the employee could highlight issues to the manager, which if given the opportunity could have been discussed and resolved months earlier. Performance management can only truly be effective when it becomes part of an organisation’s and its employee’s daily actions. The new method of performance management is to foster an ongoing culture of informal and spontaneous performance reviews through ongoing feedback, coaching, support and guidance. This can be done in conjunction with a more formal process which will avoid any bombshells dropped by either party at an annual review. It is now rather a continuation of an already ongoing conversation. Pre-requisites of ongoing performance management: Establish clear goals. This should happen at induction and be repeated on an ongoing basis. Coach along the way, identify weaknesses and areas for development, recognise success and encourage conversation. Golden rules of giving feedback: Constructive feedback is always more effective the closer it is to the event. The risk of waiting for a formal review is the possibility of the employee resenting that they were not told earlier and given the opportunity to improve. They could also continue with the ‘wrong behaviour’ in blissful ignorance. Equally positive feedback can reinforce the right behaviour and really motivate staff. Give specific feedback, don’t be vague. Explain the consequences both positive and negative, of doing the job correctly or incorrectly. Is this the right setting, do you risk embarrassing the employee if it is in front of others? Would a private setting be better? The employee needs to know that feedback is provided to develop them, not to punish them. Are they listening? Do they know what is expected of them going forward? Why not check by asking them to tell you what they will do from here on going forward and see if their answer is in line with what you had in mind. If it differs do you need to adapt? Collaboration – Listen Listen Listen! Why does the employee feel there has been poor performance? What suggestions do they have for improvement? Benefits of effective performance management to an organisation include: Hold on to your top talent! Employees including your highest performers are less likely to leave. Employees are incentivised to perform at a high level. Empowered Employees! A culture of employee accountability is fostered. As the employee becomes more independent, learns more skills and takes on greater responsibility the management job becomes easier. Identify problem areas quicker. Poor performance can be identified and improved. Your customer will have a better experience. Employees will be more motivated when they have been coached and received feedback. No matter what terms are used to describe it: coaching, feedback, goal setting, measuring performance, development etc., the common trend is that companies are striving to make performance management ingrained in the daily culture of the organisation and the actions of its employees and management. This may or may not be coupled with a formal annual appraisal system, with or without a ratings system. Either way increased two-way ongoing communication should lead to a more open and honest relationship between a manager and their employee, a workforce that are motivated and understand their role within the larger organisation as well as a more productive and effective performance by the individual, the team and the company.

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Sir Ken Robinson's Keynote Speech at Talent Summit 2018

Sir Ken Robinson's Keynote Speech at Talent Summit 2018

Sir Ken Robinson, one of the world’s leading thinkers on creativity and innovation in the workplace spoke at Talent Summit 2018. As an advisor to Fortune 500 companies and governments in Europe, Asia and the United States, Sir Ken Robinson helps transform organisations’ corporate culture to focus more on fostering and developing creativity. His New York Times best-selling books also help people tap into their creative potential. His ideas and research have made him a popular speaker on TED Talks. In fact, his 2006 and 2010 presentations have been seen by more than 350 million people in 160 countries, making Robinson the most-viewed speaker in the history of Ted.com. Talent Summit was held in the Convention Centre, Dublin on the 22nd February 2018. Founded by Sigmar Recruitment, Talent Summit has grown to become one of the largest HR & Leadership conferences in Europe, showcasing the latest thinking on talent topics from around the world. Its mission is to share thought leadership on talent to build better workplaces and working lives in an increasingly complex world of work. Talent Summit 2018 Speakers included: Sir Ken Robinson - Worlds No. 1 TedTalk Speaker Dr Peter Lovatt - Dance Psychologist, University of Hertfordshire Johnny Campbell - CEO, Social Talent Dennis Layton - Global Deputy Leader, People Advisory Services, EY Karen Ní Bhróin - Conductor in Training, RTÉ Choirs, Orchestras and Quartets David Barrett - Chief Commercial Officer, cut-e Rob Williams - Director of Employer Insights, Indeed Find out more about upcoming events on www.talentsummit.ie

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Salary Guide 2018

Salary Guide 2018

Broadly the global economic performance and Ireland’s position are positive for the rest of 2018. With unemployment at 6.1%, two points lower than the European average (8.6%) and trending closer to 5%, continued inward and indigenous investment along with low inflation, all signals point towards continued, sustainable improvement. Last year we suggested the real impacts of Brexit and the Trump administration may yet to be seen, and this may well still be the case. Ireland has been resilient throughout ten years of turbulence, however, so can be confident of maintaining growth. In terms of professional salaries, increases in the region of 4% have remained ahead of cost inflation and enabled the sustainability of economic (and employment) performance. Indeed the impact of new organisations (mainly financial and fintech) relocating some operations to Ireland from UK will be higher in 2018 due to the time it takes to set up financial operations. The strong sectors (ICT, pharmaceutical, financial, etc.) remain strong, with specialisms like GDPR, Blockchain (not just Bitcoin) and analytics getting the headlines in 2018. There is an on-going drive for a better regional spread for new and existing jobs. There is a salary differential in the region of 5-10% and better retention rates (and more property options), so the regions will be disproportionate beneficiaries of new job creation. 2018 Salary Guides for each discipline: Accountancy & Finance Banking & Financial Services Construction & Property Services HR Insurance IT Legal & Compliance Manufacturing & Engineering Marketing Office Support Sales Science & Pharma Supply Chain

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The Talent Isle

The Talent Isle

There can be no denying that the Irish economy has benefited hugely from foreign direct investment, particularly from the US. The statistics speak for themselves; today there are 700 US companies with Irish operations directly employing 165,000 people. But, the historical economical and political US-Irish relationship works both ways. With Murphys, Kennedys and O’Neills making their presence known in boardrooms the length and breadth of the 50 States, Ireland is well represented in the highest echelons on US soil. Likewise, the statistics on that side of the Atlantic speak for themselves; there are also 700 Irish companies with operations in the US who employ 100,000 US citizens. Recent changes to the political environment in the form of US protectionism has undoubtedly threatened our status as the location of choice for US companies, making up 12.1% of US FDI investment into Europe despite accounting for just 1% of the entire European economy. At a time of green shoots growth in the aftermath of one of the worst recessions the State has known, this hard won reputation in now in jeopardy. Speaking at the Boston College Ireland Business Council symposium, John Harthorne, CEO MassChallenge described protectionism as grabbing the largest slice of the pie. The responsibility of leadership should be to increase the size, not of the slice, but of the pie itself. So, what can business leaders do? Well, of course we can leave it to the Government and State agencies to do their job, or else we can get out there ourselves and deliver the message that Ireland is still a great place to do business. That is exactly what Ireland Gateway to Europe did on Wednesday April 11, 2018, when a delegation of more than 40 Irish business leaders arrived in Washington to deliver the message that Ireland’s trade partnership with the US is stronger than ever, is truly bilateral and that Ireland remains the location of choice for FDI in Europe. Ireland Gateway to Europe met with their US counterparts and political representatives on Capitol Hill with the purpose of strengthening existing business relationships and create new ones. This initiative is a not-for-profit annual trade mission made up of professional advisory firms who travel the US annually to provide a secure resource network for business expansion to help US investment succeed in setting up operations in Ireland. Founded in 2012 as a response to the economic challenges at that time of global recession, Ireland Gateway to Europe is now in its seventh year of US, UK and global trade missions. Ireland has traditionally enjoyed a particularly strong business, cultural and political relationship with the US. However, in light of the recent announcements of trade tariffs, data privacy, immigration and other protectionist policies, our concern is that there may be a perception that Irish-US trade linkages may have subsequently diminished. The fact of the matter is that the transatlantic economy grew stronger, not weaker over the past year, as did Irish -US trade with US exports to Ireland up 9% and imports to Ireland up 6%. While the Washington mission was the focal point of the 2018 trade mission, the second leg of the trip saw the group travel to Boston to engage directly with the US business community at the stateside launch of the transatlantic Boston College Ireland Business Council (BCIBC). Having launched this side of the Atlantic in Dublin last October, the US BCIBC launch took the form of a Global Leadership Symposium where US CEOs met with their Irish counterparts. The event looked at Global Leadership, where a panel of global CEOs discussed how they, as a transatlantic leadership community, can create opportunities against the backdrop of economic challenges. The purpose of the BCIBC is to establish new, and strengthen existing, transatlantic business ties between the two countries, and it is designed to enhance transatlantic business between the US and Ireland through creating connections that allow for entrepreneurial ventures to grow and prosper. The Global Leadership Symposium is one of a series of planned BCIBC CEO Exchange events that will take place twice annually over the coming years, both in Ireland and in the US. The nest event is scheduled for Dublin this coming October. Founded by the Global Leadership Institute, Boston College, and Ireland, Gateway to Europe, and Chaired by Neil Naughton of GlenDimplex, the main aim of the BCIBC is to bring influential business leaders from both communities together once a year in Dublin and in Boston to create one deeply connected transatlantic trade artery. By establishing the BCICB, the tight commercial and social bonds we share with the US can be strengthened and build upon bilaterally, business to business, in spite of any potential external or internal protectionist political policies. It’s widely known that cultural ties between Massachusetts and Ireland are deep but possibly lesser known are the strength of economic ties with 11,000 people employed by Irish companies there and Ireland being the 6th largest exporter from MA. With threats from the uncertainty of the Brexit situation ringing in our ears from the East and murmurings of protectionism coming from the West, Ireland is again in a unique position to act as the economic transatlantic hub. What will the future hold? As it stands nobody knows for certain, but the community of transatlantic business leaders has a collective, critical role to play to ensure the future foundation of business relations is maintained for generations to come. Those business relationships benefit both Ireland and the US. Let’s both grow our slices of the pie by growing the pie itself. Article featured on The Business Post