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7 Types of Scary Employees You Don’t Want To Be This Halloween

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We could all tell some horror stories about people we have worked with and this Halloween we thought we'd share 7 types of employees that will give you nightmares, as well as some tips to help those of you who find these spooky profiles a little too familiar…

 

The Ghost

This type of employee just never seems to be at their desk. When you call them you always reach their voicemail and you could be waiting hours for a response from them. They really make getting things done very difficult. It’s not that they are neglecting their responsibilities and not doing their job, they just have a habit of scheduling too many back to back meetings giving them very little time to catch up when they get back to their desks.

 

If this is you and you always find yourself away from your desk and bombarded with emails and missed calls when you return, why not try to spread out your meetings throughout the day or save travel time but having your meetings over the phone or by Skype? This way, if an urgent email appears, you can be aware of it when it happens and you won't always find yourself chasing your tail.

 

The Zombie

The zombie has usually been out the night before (bit of a socialite). They enjoy an all-night party session, which isn’t a problem, until they show up to work hungover. They lack concentration and enthusiasm and make you feel tired just by looking at them. They have also been known to call in sick because of a hangover on a few occasions.

 

We have all been there at some point but being hungover constantly in work is not a good idea and missing work for a hangover is a huge no no! Always try and keep your nights out for the weekends and if you do have to go out midweek make sure you don’t skip dinner and stop drinking after a reasonable time. Your colleagues thank you for it, not to mention your boss.

 

The Werewolf

Calm and collected one minute, aggressive the next. This type of worker is changeable, like a werewolf during a full moon. Everything is going fine but then they can lose their temper over something in an instant.

 

Keeping a level head in work is very important, no matter how frustrating something may seem, it’s not worth getting angry and upsetting your co-workers. Step outside for some fresh air if you’re feeling a little hot headed and if that doesn’t help you should always talk to your manager if you feel you are too stressed in work.

 

The Sasquatch

Personal hygiene is so important, but this employee doesn’t seem to have gotten the memo. They don’t wear suitable work clothing and forget to properly wash and groom themselves. They’re basically a bit of a slob and resemble a sasquatch.

 

Everyone needs to keep on top of this. Keep chewing gum in your pocket or bring a toothbrush to work, make sure your clothes are clean and fresh and if you have any concerns you could ask someone in your work who you trust if they have noticed a problem with your hygiene. Better to be safe than sorry.

 

The Mummy

This person worked hard to receive their qualification but has never spent any more time upskilling. They have years of work experience but haven’t put any effort into professional development. Just like a mummy they are preserved from ancient times and now their qualifications are outdated.

 

It’s always important to up-skill in your profession. If you haven’t done any workshops or courses since your degree don’t worry, there are plenty of different professional development courses you could sign up to today. Pick a part of your job that you really enjoy or that you’d like to learn more about and sign yourself up to do a workshop or course or attend an event/conference about it. It's also a great way to become enthusiastic about your job again and feel inspired to try new things in your role.

 

The Headless Horseman

This employee is completely scatter brained. They change their mind constantly, forget things and leave their colleagues feeling very confused. A lot of the time people in work will avoid involving this person in projects or asking them to help because they know they will only cause hassle.

 

Post-its, reminders and a diary is what this employee needs. As frustrating as it is to work with a Headless Horseman, imagine being one? They just need to spend some extra time in their day organising themselves and their priorities.

 

The Freddy Krueger

Named after the famous character from “A Nightmare on Elm Street“ film series, this person is a combination of some or all of the scary employees above - making them a thing of nightmares! They are difficult to communicate with, they don’t have much interest in professional development, they have anger issues and problems with personal hygiene. Much to say this worker is the worst of all 7. The Freddy Krueger employee is a thing of nightmares!

 

If you think you could be this person follow the tips in the blog. All of the issues are easily fixed, if you are passionate about your job you will have no problem turning things around.

Posted by Clare Reynolds on 31 October 2018

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