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presenting in interview

Presenting In An Interview

presenting in interview

Face to face interviews can be scary, but with the added pressure of presenting during an interview anyone can become a nervous wreck. Here are our tips to help you ace your interview presentation.

 

 

Structure Your Presentation

A strong structure is the most important thing to get right. The aim is to keep the interviewer’s attention through presenting engaging and relevant content. Plan out what you want to say through brainstorming. Draw a map showing how each point links to the next. Make sure the points you are making fit within the companies aim and objectives, thus showing the research you have done. The key thing is not to waffle.

 

A basic outline for any presentation should have:

Introduction: Give a brief overview of the subject of the presentation and what you wish to cover

Elaborate: Discuss the subject in as much detail as time will allow using as little slides as possible

Conclusion: Sum up what you have spoken about adding in your thoughts where necessary

N.B. A useful slide to include would be a “Why Me?” slide. At the end of the day you want them to hire you for the job so this should be one point they take home.

 

 

Be Visual

Use your slides to keep the panel engaged as reading from slides will send anyone into a daydream. Use bullet points and images as much as possible to keep your audience attentive.

 

Other things to include:

  • Provide hand-outs for them to read and to take away (but give them out at the end!)
  • Have inviting body language (do not cross your arms or put your hands in your pockets)
  • Do not be afraid to use gestures (it will draw their attention back to you)

 

 

Practice Makes Perfect

Preparation is a vital part of any interview and this will help overcome nerves. You should be given enough time to prepare your presentation in advance. Use this time wisely and practice until you know everything off by heart. Additional things to perfect include tone of voice and gestures.

 

Worried you might trip over your words? Ask a friend to help you practise your presentation until you’re completely confident. The key is to talk naturally as this will show the panel that you understand your area and that you are the best person for the job.

 

 

Pronounce Every Word Clearly

When you are nervous there is a temptation to speak fast to quicken the whole process; you must resist this. Add commas to your notes to signal where to take breaths and regularly pause to collect your thoughts. Speaking clearly will ensure that the panel understand your points and won’t be interrupting the presentation to ask questions.

 

 

Eye Contact

Presentations can be a lot harder than face to face interviews as the interviewee is the main talker. One sure way to ensure that people stay engaged is to maintain eye contact using friendly eyes. It is important to shift eye contact to everyone on the panel to keep everyone engaged and listening.

 

 

There Will Be Questions

Doing a presentation doesn’t mean that you will not be asked more questions. It is still an interview and the interviewer/s will still have questions to ask. They will more than likely ask about you and your presentation so be prepared.

 

For further interview advice and/or to discuss career opportunities call 01-4744624 or send a confidential email to Alan at amurphy@sigmar.ie

Posted by Alan Murphy, Team Executive Sales on 1 December 2017

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