Connecting...

W1siziisijiwmtkvmdmvmduvmtcvmzevndkvmzk5l2jyzxhpdc5qcgcixsxbinailcj0ahvtyiisijiwmdb4ntawxhuwmdnjil1d

87% of Companies Expect No Brexit Impact

W1siziisijiwmtkvmdmvmduvmtcvmzavmzavmzezl2jyzxhpdc1tyxatzhjhd2luzy5qcgcixsxbinailcj0ahvtyiisijywmhgzmdbcdtawm2mixv0

As reported in The Sunday Business Post (10th March 2019)

Sigmar Recruitment/ EY Talent Survey Takeaways

·      Companies remain bullish with 87% expecting little or no impact of impending Brexit.

·      Irish companies benefitting internationally from Brexit uncertainty with Sigmar Recruitment attracting French investment in 2018 that otherwise would have gone to London.

·      US companies considering investing in Ireland more concerned about costs, housing, property and ease of doing business.

·      Irish industry-led FDI delegation Ireland: Gateway to Europe to travel to Boston and Chicago in April to attract investment.

·      75% of non-banking jobs come from US multinationals

 

 


 

With the Brexit deadline looming, a survey of over 300 international companies, carried out by Sigmar Recruitment in association with EY, found that 87% of companies expect no impact due to Brexit.  

 

Whilst most business commentary on employment in Ireland tends to concentrate on Brexit, the steady positive growth in US investment continues to be the major contributor to jobs in Ireland.

 

Says Adrian McGennis, CEO Sigmar Recruitment & Founder Ireland: Gateway to Europe: “Demand for talent in Ireland is at an all-time high and US investment is still the main contributor. We all feel for Irish companies facing the challenges that Brexit/currency uncertainty brings but overall the employment situation is very positive.

 

Ireland:  Gateway to Europe is an annual privately funded FDI mission that travels to the US to showcase Ireland as a choice location of investment in Europe.

 

The Irish delegation of industry leaders will visit Boston and Chicago in April, meeting over 400 US CEOs including the CEOs of some major companies who are currently in Ireland.

 

“When we survey about the topics they want to discuss, Brexit barely features. They are asking about talent, property, costs and ease of doing business, as they have been for the last ten years. This gives us the opportunity to share the success stories of the many companies who have set up operations in Ireland,” continues McGennis.

 

“In 28 years, I have never seen such a strong pipeline of new jobs coming from existing and new US companies. 75% of non-banking jobs at Sigmar come from US multinationals. Last year we travelled to Washington and Boston, well prepared on what we thought were the topical issues such as Brexit, the Euro, even GDPR. Instead they were all focussed on their needs to set up in Ireland.” 

 

The Ireland Gateway to Europe group comprises banks, property specialists, recruiters, tax advisors, auditors, HR advisors and other professional services and we work collaboratively to get Ireland’s positive message by case studies and data.

 

Says McGennis: It’s great to have specialists who can credibly answer any specific queries these CEOs may have. We have competitors in most sectors but have always worked as a team to get the Irish message across. Indeed, we are very inclusive and always welcome new participants to the group.

 

“In particular, the relationships that we’ve developed with Boston College and Notre Dame University have been incredible in getting access to CEOs, ministers, congressmen and high-profile business leaders. The upcoming American Football games in Dublin in 2020 will give opportunities to further develop these relationships.”

www.gatewaytoeurope.org 

 


 

About the Survey:

The largest survey of its kind, 302 talent leaders from across Ireland took part in the survey, which focused on key talent themes and priorities for the year ahead.  The respondents comprised of senior executives responsible for talent decision making within their respective organisations, ranging from CHROs, CEOs, HR Directors to Heads of HR functions such as L&D, Recruitment, Organisational Development and Performance Management. This is the third year this survey has been conducted. 

 

 

Posted by Jamie Harnett on 13 March 2019

Sign up for HR & Recruitment Insights Weekely Email

Get a weekly email filled with content about GDPR, Recruitment, Hiring, Employer Branding and Company Culture direct to your inbox.

Sign up for our Jobseeking Tips & Advice Weekly Email

Get jobhunting tips, productivity hacks and career planning advice direct to your inbox.

Related Content

W1siziisijiwmtkvmdcvmtevmtevmzcvmdkvmzy3l2etmtawlmpwzyjdlfsiccisinrodw1iiiwindawedi2mcmixv0

10 Types Of Leadership Styles

10 Types Of Leadership Styles

1. Autocratic An autocratic leader is one who dictates all policies and procedures. Employees and team members have no say whatsoever in how things are done and are expected to follow the command and control of the leader. 2. Coaching This leadership style is about helping others to improve themselves and achieve their goals. They are there to provide guidance and counsel. This leadership style can only work if the follower is open to being advised. 3. Charismatic A charismatic leader is one often adored by their followers. Their undoubtable charisma and personality may lead people to follow their every word. They can be sometimes viewed as manipulative because their intentions may be often self-focused. 4. Transformational Transformational leadership is where a leader works with teams to identify a change that is needed, creates a vision and then guides their followers by inspiring them. A transformational leader won’t only assign tasks and goals but allow teams/ direct reports to decide their own goals to align with the overall company objectives. 5. Laissez-Faire This leadership style gives employees complete free reign with little or no supervision. This can lead to low productivity among staff. 6. Affiliative An affiliative leader promotes harmony among his or her followers and helps to resolve any conflict. This type of leader will also build teams and ensure their followers feel connected to one other. 7. Visionary This type of leader inspires others and really drives progression. They would be well respected among their peers and colleagues and they strive to encourage confidence in their direct reports and other colleagues. 8. Bureaucratic The bureaucratic leadership style was first described by Max Weber in 1947. The bureaucratic style is based on following normative rules and adhering to lines of authority. Bureaucratic leaders are similar to autocratic leaders in that they expect their team members to follow the rules and procedures precisely as instructed. 9. Transactional This form of leadership would be seen in a sales environment. Leaders will incentivise goals and give teams targets to achieve in order to gain reward. The incentive will usually be in the form of monetary and will be granted to staff if tasks are completed or if they reach the top 10 performers. 10. Democratic Leadership This type of leader is one that takes on board what other people have to say. A democratic leader allows and even encourages others to participate in decision making. Do you see any similarities in these leadership styles and the one in your company? Or do you recognise yourself as one of these leaders? Understanding these styles of leadership is a great way to realise what works and what doesn't in your company. It helps you to know the outcomes you want to achieve. Each leadership style encourages different types of performances so it’s good to know what one works best for you.

W1siziisijiwmtkvmduvmzevmtuvmzmvmzuvmja5l0j1c2luzxnzlmpwzwcixsxbinailcj0ahvtyiisijqwmhgynjajil1d

What’s The Cost Of A Bad Hire?

What’s The Cost Of A Bad Hire?

€13,100. Yes, seriously. A 2018 survey by Adare Human Resource Management estimates this to be the average price tag on a botched recruitment process in Ireland – and it’s only set to increase. With Irish business’s annual turnover exceeding the European average of 7.4% with a whopping 11%, and unemployment levels dropping to the lowest in a decade at 5.4%, it’s a jobseeker’s market and the pressure is on for companies to secure the best applicants in the shortest amount of time. It’s therefore impossible to overstate the financial benefits of using a recruiter to streamline the hiring process. Time is of the essence The longer a job vacancy remains open, the costlier it will be. The company is losing revenue every day that position remains unfilled. It is possible to work out roughly how much an open role costs a business using formula such as these. Recruiters work fast. They understand the interest in filling the vacancy as quickly as possible and act with a brisk efficiency enabled by years of practice in this specific field. Using a recruiter reduces the time it takes to find the candidate right for a position. Find the hidden gems It is getting increasingly competitive to secure strong applicants who are fielding rival offers from multiple companies, due to the aforementioned high turnover and low unemployment rates. However, using a recruiter taps into a category of contenders invisible to the untrained eye – passive candidates. Skilled workers who are not actively searching for a new job could be ideal applicants for a posting. According to a 2015 LinkedIn report, 70% of workers are not currently seeking a new job. Recruiters know how to seek these people out, widening the talent pool into a talent ocean! Save on Training A 2017 survey revealed that, on average, American businesses spend $1,886 training each new employee. Recruiters advise companies to hire candidates with the most experience and prior training available, reducing the amount businesses then have to spend on training them. Avoid a Bad Hire When you’re losing out on revenue each day from an empty position, it can be tempting to fill it as soon as possible with a candidate who may or may not be suitable for the role. However, that €13,100 figure is a strong argument for utilising all resources available to you to ensure that you select the right candidate – such as using a recruiter to streamline and advise your search.

W1siziisijiwmtkvmduvmzavmdgvntkvmtgvotewl0fkb2jlu3rvy2tfmji4mjy3nda4lmpwzwcixsxbinailcj0ahvtyiisijqwmhgynjajil1d

How to Look After Your Mental Health in the Workplace

How to Look After Your Mental Health in the Workplace

“Mental pain is less dramatic than physical pain, but it is more common and also more hard to bear. The frequent attempt to conceal mental pain increase the burden: It is easier to say "My tooth is aching" than to say "My heart is broken".” – C.S. Lewis The month of May marks Mental Health Awareness Month around the world – a time for highlighting the key battles we have yet to fight in the war against the stigmatisation of mental health issues. A recent study by VHI revealed that almost 70% of Irish corporate employees admit to needing to look after their mental wellness more effectively, and 1 in 5 have missed work due to anxiety, depression or stress in the past year. It is always advisable to seek the advice of a professional if you have concerns about your mental health. However, there are small, yet effective, measures you can take to improve your wellbeing in the workplace that can spread into your personal life in a positive, affirming way. Work/Life Balance Sir Ken Robinson noted in his keynote speech at Sigmar’s Talent Summit 2018 that, although the invention of emails was promised to save us time, we have since found that, if anything, we are less and less able to leave work behind in the workplace. It is now part of most people’s routines to check their phones first thing in the morning and reply to work-related emails before leaving home, always thinking about what needs to be done that day. It’s important that you ‘work smart, not long.’ This means actively leaving work behind in the office, working efficiently during the day so you don’t feel compelled to continue with it after hours. If the quantity of work you are being expected to complete within working hours is too much to do so successfully, be sure to speak up and discuss the manageability of your workload with your supervisor. Communication is key – they’re going to keep piling on the work as long you stay quiet about how overwhelmed you are, so make sure you speak up and be heard before it becomes too much to handle. Employers won’t know where the pressure lies unless you tell them. If you’re unsure of how much your work life spills over into your personal life, why don’t you try keeping a log for a month? Jot down in a diary how many hours you work every day – not just when you’re sitting at your desk, but when you’re thinking about work at home, composing emails and returning calls out of hours. It may build a more objectively troubling picture than you can see currently from the inside. Make The Most Of Your Breaks Don’t be afraid to make the most of the breaks you are allotted at work. Once you’re on a roll, it’s tempting to power through lunchtime and eat at your desk, one eye always on your computer screen. Try and avoid doing this when you can. Take a walk, practise mindfulness or meditation, experience new places to eat, socialise with co-workers or friends who work nearby. “But I don’t have time to meditate!” I hear you exclaim. Yes, you do! ‘Meditation’ is not always synonymous with pulling on yoga pants, lighting up a stick of incense and adopting the lotus position. You can meditate absolutely anywhere – in a local park, at a café…even sitting at your desk! If you’re not confident leading your own meditation, you can find five-minute guided sessions free online, like this one here. There are also some great customisable apps you can get on your phone, such as Timer and Headspace. It is impossible to overvalue the importance of taking time to relax, clear your head and focus on your own wellbeing. You’ll find this re-energises you for the day ahead, as well as provide an invaluable opportunity to assess your current state of mind and mentally address any emotional concerns or anxieties. You may also be pleasantly surprised at how easily solutions pop into your head when you take just a few minutes to collect your thoughts. Communication This one works both ways for employers as well as employees. Communication is the key to destigmatising conversations about mental health. In his TEDx talk on workplace mental health, Tom Oxley says ‘you don’t make people unwell by talking about mental health – you give them the opportunity to speak out sooner’. There’s a flawed unspoken terror that speaking out about mental illness will somehow worsen the problem, as if it’s contagious or something you can conjure up into existence within your own mind. The reality is that many sufferers don’t feel able to speak up due to the prejudice surrounding their condition, and the fear that their workplace would not be supportive of them if they did so. The best way an employer can foster an atmosphere of positivity, health and wellbeing is to ensure that their workers know that they are free to talk openly about any feelings of stress, anxiety or depression and won’t face indirect penalisation for doing so. The first reaction of many employers is to offer a struggling staff member limited time off to recover, then expect them to return to work and continue as usual. While time off may be a solution for some employees, bosses should also consider the advantages of offering flexible working hours to affected workers. Tom Oxley strongly advocates for good communication practices between employers and employees to ensure that no one ever feels alienated from their place of work, and that anxieties don’t build up over time into uncontrollable crises. In turn, employees should communicate to their employers about their feelings on mental health in the workplace, as far as they feel comfortable to do so. Being transparent about how you’re feeling and what you need from your job to help you recover will give your boss the tools to help you in the way that’s most beneficial for you. If you are worried that taking time off would only serve to isolate you from the company, voice that concern. Your employer should want to get the very best out of you – they hired you for a reason. It’s in their interest to give you the support you need. Create a healthy routine Studies have consistently proven a strong link between mental health and physical health, and specialists are adamant that one of the best ways to maintain good mental wellbeing is to look after your physical welfare. Your job may be intellectually demanding, with long hours and difficult tasks you have to tackle each day, taking a toll on your mental health. This also likely means your job is sedentary. Indeed, scientists have connected the rise in global obesity to the increasing number of jobs that don’t require any form of physical activity. You may be hard pressed to find the time to exercise during a busy work week, but it’s important you look after your body – it will only beneficially impact your mental wellbeing. Take a stroll during your lunchbreak, do 30 mins of yoga before work, or even try training for a half marathon over the course of a few months. Be sure to stock up your desk drawer with nutritious snacks rather than sugary ones, such as nuts, fruit and protein bars. Snacknation has published an extensive list of delicious office snack ideas if you’re dry on inspiration. These are just a few ways you can work to ensure your mental wellbeing in the workplace, which will in turn hopefully boost your productivity, energy and, ultimately, happiness. While mental health is something we can’t always necessarily control, we can impact the way in which we talk about it, breaking down the harmful social barriers that currently thwart constructive discussions on preventative measures.

W1siziisijiwmtkvmdqvmjuvmtuvndivmtqvnduvdhv0lmpwzyjdlfsiccisinrodw1iiiwindawedi2mcmixv0

7 Leaderships Styles – What Game of Thrones Leader are you?

7 Leaderships Styles – What Game of Thrones Leader are you?

The fantasy medieval HBO series, Game of Thrones has become well known for its controversial themes. Kings, queens, knights and rebels all play a deadly game to gain control of the Seven Kingdoms of Westeros and sit upon the Iron Throne. 8 years later and it's safe to say the series would be nothing without its leaders and just like the real world, these leaders come in all shapes and sizes. We have listed 7 different leadership styles portrayed in Game of Thrones. Are you any of these leaders? If not, maybe you’ve worked with one? Maybe you know a Cersei or a Jon Snow? Autocratic Leadership An autocratic leader is one who dictates all policies and procedures. Employees and team members have no say whatsoever in how things are done and are expected to follow the command and control of the leader. Cersei Lannister would be classed as this type of leader. She decides the rules and demands that everyone follow her ways. via GIPHY Democratic Leadership This type of leader is one that takes on board what other people have to say. A democratic leader allows and even encourages others to participate in decision making. Davos Seaworth is this kind of leader. He displays effective listening and sharing. He is also great at building teams which can be seen in his collaboration with Jon Snow (or Aegon Targaryen). via GIPHY Coaching Leadership This leadership style is about helping others to improve themselves and achieve their goals. They are there to provide guidance and counsel. This leadership style can only work if the follower is open to being advised. This style can be seen between Tyrion Lannister and his relationship with Daenerys Targaryen. He provides her with knowledge and guidance when she seeks it. He is well respected, and his advice is highly regarded. via GIPHY Charismatic Leadership A charismatic leader is one often adored by their followers. Their undoubtable charisma and personality may lead people to follow their every word. They can be sometimes viewed as manipulative because their intentions may be often self-focused. Jamie Lannister portrays this style of leadership. His family name automatically gave him status, however his charm, fighting ability and good looks made him a charismatic leader. via GIPHY Transformational Leadership Transformational leadership is where a leader works with teams to identify a change that is needed, creates a vision and then guides their followers by inspiring them. This can be no one other than Daenerys Targaryen. On her relentless mission to rule the seven kingdoms, she uprooted long standing and outdated traditions to achieve her vision of a just and fair world for all. She freed slaves in Astapor, Yunkai and Mareen, freeing all unsullied while gaining their allegiance. via GIPHY Laissez-Faire Leadership This leadership style gives employees complete free reign with little or no supervision. This is very like Sansa Stark’s leadership style in season 7 when she ruled the North in Jon Snow’s absence. Sansa was preoccupied with her reuniting her divided Stark family while keeping a close eye on the cunning Littlefinger. Sansa did very little of her own ruling, seeking refuge in John’s commands. via GIPHY Affiliative Leadership An affiliative leader promotes harmony among his or her followers and helps to resolve any conflict. This type of leader will also build teams and ensure their followers feel connected to one other. John Snow encapsulates this form of leadership. He created once unthinkable alliances putting himself in the firing line to ensure all conflict was resolved. John’s only concern is others and he does his best for everyone while ensuring everything is communicated correctly so everyone understands his rulings and makes sure they feel heard. via GIPHY Let us know what leaders you've come across in your working life.