Connecting...

W1siziisijiwmtkvmdmvmduvmtcvmzevndkvmzk5l2jyzxhpdc5qcgcixsxbinailcj0ahvtyiisijiwmdb4ntawxhuwmdnjil1d

87% of Companies Expect No Brexit Impact

W1siziisijiwmtkvmdmvmduvmtcvmzavmzavmzezl2jyzxhpdc1tyxatzhjhd2luzy5qcgcixsxbinailcj0ahvtyiisijywmhgzmdbcdtawm2mixv0

As reported in The Sunday Business Post (10th March 2019)

Sigmar Recruitment/ EY Talent Survey Takeaways

·      Companies remain bullish with 87% expecting little or no impact of impending Brexit.

·      Irish companies benefitting internationally from Brexit uncertainty with Sigmar Recruitment attracting French investment in 2018 that otherwise would have gone to London.

·      US companies considering investing in Ireland more concerned about costs, housing, property and ease of doing business.

·      Irish industry-led FDI delegation Ireland: Gateway to Europe to travel to Boston and Chicago in April to attract investment.

·      75% of non-banking jobs come from US multinationals

 

 


 

With the Brexit deadline looming, a survey of over 300 international companies, carried out by Sigmar Recruitment in association with EY, found that 87% of companies expect no impact due to Brexit.  

 

Whilst most business commentary on employment in Ireland tends to concentrate on Brexit, the steady positive growth in US investment continues to be the major contributor to jobs in Ireland.

 

Says Adrian McGennis, CEO Sigmar Recruitment & Founder Ireland: Gateway to Europe: “Demand for talent in Ireland is at an all-time high and US investment is still the main contributor. We all feel for Irish companies facing the challenges that Brexit/currency uncertainty brings but overall the employment situation is very positive.

 

Ireland:  Gateway to Europe is an annual privately funded FDI mission that travels to the US to showcase Ireland as a choice location of investment in Europe.

 

The Irish delegation of industry leaders will visit Boston and Chicago in April, meeting over 400 US CEOs including the CEOs of some major companies who are currently in Ireland.

 

“When we survey about the topics they want to discuss, Brexit barely features. They are asking about talent, property, costs and ease of doing business, as they have been for the last ten years. This gives us the opportunity to share the success stories of the many companies who have set up operations in Ireland,” continues McGennis.

 

“In 28 years, I have never seen such a strong pipeline of new jobs coming from existing and new US companies. 75% of non-banking jobs at Sigmar come from US multinationals. Last year we travelled to Washington and Boston, well prepared on what we thought were the topical issues such as Brexit, the Euro, even GDPR. Instead they were all focussed on their needs to set up in Ireland.” 

 

The Ireland Gateway to Europe group comprises banks, property specialists, recruiters, tax advisors, auditors, HR advisors and other professional services and we work collaboratively to get Ireland’s positive message by case studies and data.

 

Says McGennis: It’s great to have specialists who can credibly answer any specific queries these CEOs may have. We have competitors in most sectors but have always worked as a team to get the Irish message across. Indeed, we are very inclusive and always welcome new participants to the group.

 

“In particular, the relationships that we’ve developed with Boston College and Notre Dame University have been incredible in getting access to CEOs, ministers, congressmen and high-profile business leaders. The upcoming American Football games in Dublin in 2020 will give opportunities to further develop these relationships.”

www.gatewaytoeurope.org 

 


 

About the Survey:

The largest survey of its kind, 302 talent leaders from across Ireland took part in the survey, which focused on key talent themes and priorities for the year ahead.  The respondents comprised of senior executives responsible for talent decision making within their respective organisations, ranging from CHROs, CEOs, HR Directors to Heads of HR functions such as L&D, Recruitment, Organisational Development and Performance Management. This is the third year this survey has been conducted. 

 

 

Posted by Jamie Harnett on 13 March 2019

Related Content

W1siziisijiwmjevmtavmtuvmtuvmjkvndyvmdq1nwzmnjetzwuwmc00ywyxlwe3n2etnwe1ndvmodcxmjzll3nodxr0zxjzdg9ja18zntg1mzgwntquanbnil0swyjwiiwidgh1bwiilci0mdb4mjywiyjdxq

Resignations Surge in September as Offices Re-open

Resignations Surge in September as Offices Re-open

Main Points Q3 record breaking recruitment placement results Highest in 20 years, peaking in September Up 44% for same period in 2020 Job orders in the first half of October are trending higher than any previous single month in company 20-year history The Talent Shortage Economy: Recruitment (for on-site labour and remote skills) is the single biggest threat to the Irish economy War for talent now being fought on two fronts: Battle for Retention internally and the Skills Struggle externally    “The Great Return is causing a Mass Exodus. The reopening of offices in September has prompted a new surge in resignations as Ireland now faces a Talent Crisis. Employers are increasingly requesting in-office presence and Employees are voting with their feet..” says Robert Mac Giolla Phádraig, founding director Sigmar Recruitment:   Sigmar Recruitment today reports a record high number of job placements for Q3 (July, August, September) 2021, up 44% on the same period 2020. The figures released today top previous results recorded in Q2, 2021, with September recording the best single month ever in the 20-year history of Sigmar. Job orders in the first two weeks in October are trending higher than any single full month in the company’s 20-year history.   The first half of the year saw strong, consistent growth with job placements, peaking initially in May. Summer months remained as strong, peaking once more in September. Robert Mac Giolla Phádraig, founding director of Sigmar believes that the request to return to the office in September has caused employees to revolt, as they do not wish to return to pre-pandemic conditions and practices..   Commenting on the tightening of the labour market, Mac Giolla Phádraig says: “Demand for talent has remained at an all-time high for the second quarter in our 20-year history. It was somewhat unusual not to see demand abate over the summer months. Indeed, demand continued to increase over the summer, resulting in September’s record results. The rate of job requests  in the first two weeks of October is unprecedented, indicating continued in Q4 and raises the question of the sustainability of talent supply.   “Remote working has literally opened up a world of new opportunity no longer bound by location which is creating significant churn in the professional skills market. This last 18 months has seen employees demand greater flexibility. The request to return to the office by employers in September has prompted employees to reconsider whether they recommit or resign. Many are resigning.”   Mac Giolla Phádraig likens remote work to long-distance relationships, which in many cases don’t work out. “We’ve gone from “living” with our employees in an office environment to long distance relationships, which often sees commitment recede over time. The context of location also opened up new experiences and possibilities on a scale never before seen. In September, many employers have asked employees to “trial” living together once more, which in some cases leads to a reunion or in others to separation.   "Another factor, on the employee side is that of identity and how what we do makes up part of who we are as individuals. “This last 18 months has asked big questions of us all, mainly how our working lives interact with our lives and how we identify with our working lives. In the absence of a workplace we’ve reassessed the balance between who we are and what we do, resulting in lesser commitment to our working selves and therefore to our employers. Employee loyalty has therefore become increasingly under question with many workers are now committed to the experience of work over the employer, adding further to the current levels of churn.”     Talent Shortage Economy Recruitment for both the on-site and remote talent remains the single largest threat to the Irish economy. Says Mac Giolla Phádraig: ”We are seeing two macro trends converge at once, compounding demand for talent across all sectors – (1) supply of labour and (2)shortage of skills.”   The “high touch economy” for on-site labour in sectors such as construction, logistics, retail and hospitality are currently experiencing severe labour shortages. The disruption to international talent supply chains have caused significant bottlenecks to the supply of labour,  particularly effecting on-site, lower skilled jobs. On-going travel restrictions and pace vaccine rollout continue to impede immigration globally, but as an island nation we are now seeing the impact of this as demand recovers at pace.   The “low-touch economy”, on the other hand, where remote work is viable is experiencing greater churn due to the expansion of opportunity for skilled workers, shift in motivation, identity and desire for flexibility. This is now being experienced more acutely in Ireland as offices re-open and employees now vote with their feet, in choosing to resign over reengaging with employers in many cases. Demand has been particularly strong in IT, Financial Services and Life Sciences.    He adds: “If we thought the war for talent was tough, just wait for the battle of attrition. Retaining workers rather than attracting them is now emerging as the number one challenge for businesses across the globe.”