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Working & Living In Ireland

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Relocating to a different country for a job can be both exciting and terrifying. To make your move successful, preparation is vital. If you’re thinking of moving to Ireland, you’re probably asking yourself the following questions:

 

How is the housing market? How do I get a PPS number? How do I to set up a bank account? How do I set up taxes? What transport is available? What is it like to livein Ireland?

 

 

We have devised a list of what you need to know about moving to Ireland…

 

Accommodation

You can look for private rented accommodation through local newspapers, real estate agencies or websites for example: www.daft.ie, www.let.ie, https://www.myhome.ie/rentals. The quality of rental accommodation can vary so you should view the property before making any tenancy agreement. It is common for people who have not met before to rent a house together and to share the costs of the house, including gas, telephone and electricity bills.

You usually pay rent monthly, in advance. An initial deposit of one or two months’ rent is also required.

 

 

PPS Number

A Personal Public Service (PPS) Number is a unique reference number for all dealings with public service in Ireland that helps you access social welfare benefits, public services and information. You can apply for your PPS number at your local Social Welfare Office.

http://www.welfare.ie/en/Pages/Personal-Public-Service-Number-Registration-Centres-by-Count.aspx

 

You must be already living in Ireland in order to apply for a PPS Number. You will be asked to produce documentary evidence of identity and residence in Ireland. Different documentary evidence will be required, depending on your nationality. To get a PPS Number, you will need to fill out an application form and provide proof of your identity. If you are not Irish, you will need to produce the following documents:

  • Your passport/national identity card or immigration card
  • Evidence of your address, such as a household bill. This should be the first thing you do when you move to Ireland because you will need it to work and set up a bank account.

 

 

Taxes

There are two rates of tax in Ireland:

  • 20% on the first €34,550 earned
  • 40% on the remainder of your salary

 

You will also pay PRSI and the Universal Social Charge on your income. This social insurance contribution goes towards providing State Social and Health Services. You will pay 4% on all your income in PRSI. The Universal Social Charge (USC) is a tax that has replaced both the income levy and the health levy (also known as the health contribution). Rates for 2018 are;

  • Income up to €12,012 - 0.5%
  • Between €12,012 and €19,372 - 2%
  • Between €19,372 and €70,044 - 4.75%
  • Above €70,044 - 8%

 

 

Bank Account

Setting up a bank account in Ireland is often something that is overlooked in the excitement of relocating. Many employers will prefer to pay into an Irish bank account and setting up an Irish bank account can be stressful if you don’t get yourself organised.

Things you will need:

  1. Proof of Address (Utility bill or Lease Agreement)
  2. Proof of ID
  3. PPS Number

 

Once you have moved to Ireland and have the above information, choose one of Ireland’ many banks e.g. AIB, Bank of Ireland, Permanent TSB or Ulster Bank and set up your account straight away.

 

 

Living in Ireland

 

Weather

Thanks to the moderating effect of the Atlantic Gulf Stream, Ireland’s climate is relatively mild for its latitude, with a mean annual temperature of around 10°C. The temperature drops below freezing only intermittently during winter, and snow is scarce – perhaps one or two brief flurries a year. The coldest months are January and February, when daily temperatures range from 4° to 8°C, with 7°C the average. In summer, temperatures during the day are a comfortable 15° to 20°C.

 

Healthcare

Any person, regardless of nationality, who is accepted by the Health Service Executive (HSE) as being ordinarily resident in Ireland is entitled to free public hospital services but may have to pay in-patient and out-patient hospital charges. You are also entitled to subsidised prescribed drugs and medicines and maternity and infant care services and you may be entitled to free or subsidised community care and personal social services.

 

Social Clubs

There is a wide range of social clubs in Ireland catering for all interests. Sport in particular is a hugely popular pastime in Ireland. Some of the most popular sports in Ireland include Gaelic Games, Soccer and Rugby. Below are resources that provide details of clubs and societies throughout Ireland.

  • Localclubsireland.com - directory of sporting clubs throughout Ireland
  • Meetup.com - lists group meetings in cities around the world to help bring people with common interests together and promote the development of active local communities. Search groups of whatever your interest is in Ireland all over the country.
  • Newcomers Club Worldwide - worldwide directory of newcomers clubs for newly arrived expatriates, including Ireland.

 

Transport

  • Rail Service: Iarnród Éireann, is responsible for operating rail services in Ireland. The company operates passenger rail services nationwide and provides commuter rail services, including the DART service in Dublin and the Arrow service from Dublin to Kildare.
 
  • Bus: Bus Éireann provides various bus services on a network of routes throughout Ireland. It operates intercity coach services and provides commuter services for major cities. City and town bus services are also provided, together with a local bus service throughout the country. For further information on these services, routes and fares see www.buseireann.ie

 

Driving

  • If you have a driving licence issued by an EU/EEA member state you can drive in Ireland as long as your existing licence is valid. It is possible to exchange a driving licence issued by an EU member state or an EEA member state (Norway, Liechtenstein and Iceland) for an Irish driving licence. It is also possible to exchange a driving licence issued by certain recognised states for an Irish driving licence. 
  • If you are the holder of a driving licence issued by a country that is not recognised for driving licence exchange, you cannot exchange your licence for an Irish licence. You will only get an Irish driving licence after you have gone through the full driver licensing procedure (see www.rsa.ie for further information).

 

For further information, view our Working & Living Guides:

 
 

Posted by Clare Reynolds on 15 May 2018

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