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recruitment strategies for success

Top 3 Recruitment Strategies For Success

recruitment strategies for success

As the economy improves, we can expect the competition for talent to become more prevalent in the Irish marketplace. With that brings recruiting challenges for HR departments, how do you ensure you can attract the talent you want to your company?

 

Focusing only on what worked before such as job postings on jobs boards is not effective in this day and age.  Today’s recruiting requires companies to advertise more than an available opportunity, the focus has moved from just sourcing to selling to candidates and this entails; employer branding, candidate experience and cultural fit.

 

1. Employer Branding

Gone are the days when a jobseeker was looking for any old job, now candidates want more – a job with purpose, a work environment they enjoy, opportunity for progression etc.  To compete you need to tell candidates your story, how you differ from your competitors and why your company is better to work for. Then make it easy for jobseekers to find this information! A career site is a great place to start – include stories from your current employees (your best brand ambassadors) and give a sense of the company culture.  Videos can be a great way to showcase company personality. Then once your brand is in place promote it, share your stories and videos across your social media platforms.

 

2. Candidate Experience

Once you’ve established your employer brand, don’t ruin all your effort with a poor candidate experience.  This is one of the most common frustrations jobseekers have – lack of communication and feedback which can leave a sour taste in a candidate’s mouth and deter them from your recruitment process.  An automated reply is better than no response at all but do try to give personalised feedback where possible.  A candidate is investing a lot of time and effort in applying to your position so respect this and in return set expectations, establish a communication plan with timeframes as to when to deliver feedback etc. Don’t leave people waiting; let them know when you’ll be in touch.

 

3. Cultural Fit

Finally, while by now you hope to be attracting the best talent available, you want to be sure you are hiring the “RIGHT PEOPLE”.  A candidate may be perfect on paper but if they don’t fit with your company values, chances are they won’t work out as expected.  When a candidate’s and company’s values align, an organisation gets a happier, more productive employee who is more likely to stay with the company for longer.  Therefore ensure you are evaluating your cultural fit throughout the recruitment process.

 

To compete for talent you need to give your best impression to candidates and if you can do all of the above, you are positioning your company for recruitment success.

Posted by Julia Purcell, Marketing & Communications Manager on 7 December 2017

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Taken from Silicon Republic Leaders’ Insights, Sigmar’s Adrian McGennis discusses building a brand overseas and why a ‘land and expand’ model isn’t always the best option. Adrian McGennis is CEO and co-founder at Irish recruitment company Sigmar. Prior to Sigmar, McGennis was managing director with Marlborough and he has been involved in two successful IPOs. He holds a degree in engineering from University College Dublin and has garnered several postgraduate management awards. Founded in 2002, Sigmar has been named as a Best Managed Company by Deloitte for the past three years. Last August it opened a new European talent hub in Co Kerry as it announced plans to create 50 roles. Describe your role and what you do. As part of a team to grow a meaningful, profitable, worthy business and enjoy the experience – this involves developing people in a positive, learning, achieving culture. As well as building great relationships with clients and candidates, we are passionate about contributing to community. How do you prioritise and organise your working life? At all levels we have really great teams at Sigmar, so we get a strong buy-in to the company goals. This will be the basis of prioritisation. Maintaining the culture is the basis for values and growth, so spend a lot of time with colleagues and customers. Thankfully, our partnership with Groupe Adéquat has been very positive and they are like-minded in values, so prioritisation and organisation haven’t changed much. What are the biggest challenges facing your sector and how are you tackling them? Having enjoyed 10 years of strong growth, the potential for economic uncertainty could present a challenge. We are talking with clients more and have the scale and agility to provide flexible solutions for them. 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