Connecting...

retain talent in organisation

Please Don’t Go! How To Retain Top Talent In Your Organisation

retain talent in organisation

Businesses exert a lot of time and resources in sourcing and appointing the right people. Having excellent staff is great but you cannot rest on your laurels. Competitors are always ready to prise them away with lucrative offers. How do you ensure that your best and brightest remain happy in their jobs and committed to your company?

 

 

Create a nice atmosphere

If your workplace is a pleasant place to work, your staff will feel more comfortable and have less reason to seek a move. Good rapport can be fostered by organising occasional staff outings, parties and collective participation in charity events. The investment in morale boosting activities can be crucial to staff retention in the long run.

 

 

Keep the lines of communication open

The phrase ‘my door is always open’ may be a cliché, but every manager should operate an open door policy. Look for employees input at meetings and ask for feedback when introducing new measures or projects and consider implementing suggestions they might have. This openness and transparency generates positivity amongst staff as they feel that you trust them and value their input and opinions.

 

 

Keep staff challenged

The best talent in any organisation want to be challenged in their role. If they are not stimulated by their work they may consider looking for pastures new. Vary tasks where possible. Assign staff to testing projects where they can put their skill set to use in different areas of the company. This will help invigorate staff and make them feel that every day at work represents a new challenge.

 

 

Reward excellence

Hard work and great results need to be acknowledged by management. Few things are more disheartening in the workplace than top class work not being appreciated. Acknowledgement can take the form of bonuses and generous commission rates or staff outings and parties. If employers feel their efforts are going unnoticed they can feel undervalued and begin to look at other organisations where they may receive more recognition and rewards.

 

 

Allow for work/life balance

Companies that recognise that employees have lives outside of the workplace generally have higher staff retention rates. If at all possible, offer schemes that allow for flexi time and even working from home. For example I’m currently working remotely from Canada for Sigmar in Ireland as I really wanted to go travelling for a few months without having to look for a job, so my boss has let me do that.

Ensure that you have adequate sick leave in place and provide sufficient holiday time. If employees don’t feel that they are receiving good perks or are unhappy with their work/life balance they could think about making a move.

 

 

Provide a platform for continued learning

Assertive employees want to learn and grow within an organisation. Allow them to attend seminars and training courses and sit internal exams if feasible. Staff will be grateful for the chance to upskill and increase their knowledge base.

 

 

Opportunity for progression

Every ambitious employee has the desire to progress their career as much as possible. It’s vital that structures are in place to allow progression. Hiring from within the organisation can have a really positive effect. Staff can see that there is a chance of advancement within the company. If talented members of the organisation see senior roles being filled by outside candidates, they can feel undervalued and become disheartened. This may lead to them seeking a move to another company where they feel they may receive the opportunities they deserve.

 

 

Conclusion

We hear time and again that employees are an organisations most valuable resource. Keeping them feeling valued and satisfied should be one of your main priorities. Staff leaving can be bad for company spirit and hinder productivity, while finding replacements can be difficult. Happy employees who are comfortable in their post are a lot less likely to leave. The onus is on you as a company to ensure that your employees are content and fulfilled in the job.

Posted by Recruitment Consultant, Sigmar on 7 December 2017

Related Content

Adobe Stock 334952746

1 in 3 of workers in Ireland have NEVER set foot in the workplace as only a quarter now working fulltime in office

1 in 3 of workers in Ireland have NEVER set foot in the workplace as only a quarter now working fulltime in office

Talent Summit Employment Survey 2022 -  The Talent Summit Employment Survey 2022 was commissioned by Sigmar Recruitment in partnership with Globalization Partners, the world’s leading global employment platform, as part of Talent Summit 2022. At a glance:35% of Ireland’s current workforce has never been to the office. Major social/ psychological implications. 26% now full time in office, 30% hybrid, 44% full time remote81% of employers to recruit in 202269% of employers to offer pay rise of 9% in 2022 (while 84% of employees expect pay rise)New Legislation - 53% of workforce can choose where they work. 68% of this population expected to choose to work from home.  Says Talent Summit founder and Sigmar CCO, Robert Mac Giolla Phádraig: “The world of work has been in a flux for the past two years, as things begin to settle, the question of workplace remains up for debate as unprecedented levels of churn within the workforce has caused the power to shift from employer to employee. Many people are now choosing to work permanently from home, which in turn is being supported by the new legislation, forcing many employers to soften their rhetoric around returning to the office. Does this work for the employer and employee? Well, I think the remote experiment seems to have worked in the short term at least with full-time remote here to stay, but not at its current level. Hybrid working models are really in their infancy and the employers are facing into uncharted waters when it comes to  sustaining individual flexibility for all, as choice around workplace re-emerges. While there are clear benefits to remote work, I don’t think we have enough data or evidence on the impact of long term, deeply individualised, isolated work has on our people and society.”  Nick Adams, Vice President, EMEA, Globalization Partners comments, “The past two years have triggered the world’s biggest remote work experiment, and it is changing not just the way we work but the way we hire and onboard talent too. Companies are finding the best talent all over the world and not just on their doorstep. Talent shortages may be a thing of the past: The solution is to go where the talent lives.” ----------------------------Over 1/3rd (35%) of the current workforce has never set foot inside their place of employment, according to new research carried out on behalf of this week’s Talent Summit conference in Dublin.   The Talent Summit Employment Survey 2022 suggests that just 26% of the workforce is currently working fulltime in the office with 44% working full time remotely, and 30% hybrid. The Right to Request Remote Working legislation will have a significant impact in 2022 with 53% of workforce in a position to choose where they work. 68% of this population is expected to choose to work from home. The recruitment market is at the highest it has ever been in the 20-year history of Sigmar Recruitment.  81% of employers will recruit in 2022. Pay is set to be a major issue in 2022 with 84% of employees expecting a pay rise. Employers are open to discussing the issue with 69% of employers agreeing to offer pay rises this year. The average pay rise on offer is 9%. According to Talent Summit founder and Sigmar CCO, Robert Mac Giolla Phádraig, Ireland is at the forefront of the changing work model globally: “As a central hub of some of the world’s most progressive and innovative companies, Ireland is now emerging as home to companies who are at the forefront of moulding, shaping and shifting how, where, when and by whom work is done as we emerge from the pandemic. While remote and hybrid working seems to be working for the employer with just 15% finding it a hindrance, my concern is that we have an entire generation of workers who are missing out on the social and psychological benefits of working in a communal environment with friends and colleagues.”  Talent Summit 2022 Employment Survey Highlights Micro-environment - Out of Office35% of the current workforce were hired since the pandemic and have never been to a physical workplace. Major psychological and social implications. Isolation an issue. Majority of workforce choose full time remote even with offices reopening:26% full time in office (34% anticipated in 2021)30% working hybrid ( 44% anticipated in  2021)44% full time remote  (22% anticipated in 2021) 95% of hybrid workforce work 3 days of less in the office – majority choose two days 40% 31% of workforce expected back in office by end of year Sentiment this year is that office space will remain the same. In 2021, 40% expected a reduction.  Macro-environment - Talent shortage economy.With the presence of a massive talent shortage economy, pressure is on all fronts; internal retention, external recruitment and costs.Recruitment and retention are the top 2 priorities for HR Leaders  - 12 months ago it was wellbeing and employee experience.Hyper competition for talent: This year sees the highest number of employers anticipating adding staff (81%) over past 5 years.Recruitment has gone global: Opportunity now finds talent. 62% have recruited outside of Ireland and 77% are willing to hire wherever talent resides.Labour costs: 69% of employers expect to increase salaries by 9% (highest gross uplift we’ve seen in doing this survey the last 5 years).Employee expectations have soared: 84% anticipate a pay rise compared to 54% in 2021 – leads into a further cycle of attrition.  Legal Environment - Right to Request Remote WorkWith 53% of workforce having control over where they choose to work from highlights the potential threat proposed legislation (in Ireland) to offer the right to work remote may pose. We may in fact be alienating nearly half the working population creating new unintended workplace biases. Employers anticipate that 68% of this population will choose long-term remote working options, which means the proposed legislation applies to 36% of the overall workforce population68% of workforce expect long-term remote working options.53% of workforce are expected to be given long-term remote working option.When asked what impact the proposed legislation will have on their organisation, 33% of respondents said it would help, 52% said no-impact and 15% said it would hinder. ABOUT THIS SURVEYThe Talent Summit Employment Survey 2022 was commissioned by Sigmar Recruitment in partnership with Globalization Partners, the world’s leading global employment platform  as part of Talent Summit 2022. This is the fifth year the study has been conducted, measuring the pulse of Talent Leaders on a range of Talent Topics. The survey ran from 09/02/22 to 12/03/22 with 153 respondents. 63% Senior HR leaders and 37% Business owners/ leaders across all company sizes, sectors and industries. Europe’s largest HR, work and employment conference, Talent Summit 2022 will take place in Dublin’s Convention Centre on Thursday, 24 March, 2022. With 2,000 people in physical attendance, as well as countless set to attend virtually, Talent Summit 2022 will see the largest group of HR leaders to convene in Europe since the pandemic. www.talentsummit.ie

Adobe Stock 441110714

Salary Guide 2022

Salary Guide 2022

Salary Guide 2022 (Full)Salary Guide Ireland 2022 (PDF)Salary Guide 2022 by DepartmentAccountancy & Finance Construction & Property Services Financial Services & InsuranceHRITLegal & ComplianceLife SciencesManufacturing & EngineeringMarketingMultilingualOffice SupportSalesSupply ChainExecutive Summary From Adie McGennis, CEOWhat a year! We came into the year with high uncertainty but hope that we had all seen the chaotic stage of the pandemic over and a “New Normal” (or “New Abnormal”) giving stability and growth to businesses and economies. Equity markets and job vacancies grew in the first half of 2021 to record levels. At Sigmar, we had experienced our strongest month in twenty years by May and have broken business records since then. It applied to both the permanent and temp/contract jobs market. This in itself, is unusual because generally strong markets see an increase in permanent hiring, and less utilisation of temps and contractors. Such was the nearly frenzied, demand that companies looked for any solution to enable their growth. Salary inflation, as well as price inflation, began to increase, but all indicators show that further increases are coming. This was across the board, but particularly in IT and life sciences. Certain skills are experiencing double digit inflation, purely because demand is at an all-time high. Supply of skills by re-training or re-educating staff from sectors that suffered (retail, hospitality, etc.) was slow. It does present opportunities for SMEs to compete with larger multinationals, as the employee experience has never been more important and the flexibility that SMEs can generally give and the speed by which they can move, can give significant edge. Remote work obviously continued to increase significantly, and hybrid models seem generally to be the optimum for employees. Tax and legislative issues with working in a different country has slowed this internationalisation, but it does present excellent talent opportunities once it is well planned. Traditional professions, like accounting, HR and legal grew as pent-up demand was evident. In Ireland particularly, construction is very buoyant after the tight Covid restrictions closed many sites in 2021 lifted and the need for housing requires a large increase in activity in the coming years. So, a year of unprecedented growth in demand for talent, giving challenge and opportunity. The recovery of economies will sustain this growth throughout 2022 but some apprehension prevails that global economic shocks could accelerate recession. So, it is difficult to be over-confident on a medium-term basis. Predictions are difficult but I would estimate that demand will begin to level out and drop late 2022 and return to more “normal” or pre-Covid levels in 2023. The various Covid strains continue to challenge, but more importantly we hope everyone stays safe and healthy. 

Shutterstock 358538054

Resignations Surge in September as Offices Re-open

Resignations Surge in September as Offices Re-open

Main Points Q3 record breaking recruitment placement results Highest in 20 years, peaking in September Up 44% for same period in 2020 Job orders in the first half of October are trending higher than any previous single month in company 20-year history The Talent Shortage Economy: Recruitment (for on-site labour and remote skills) is the single biggest threat to the Irish economy War for talent now being fought on two fronts: Battle for Retention internally and the Skills Struggle externally    “The Great Return is causing a Mass Exodus. The reopening of offices in September has prompted a new surge in resignations as Ireland now faces a Talent Crisis. Employers are increasingly requesting in-office presence and Employees are voting with their feet..” says Robert Mac Giolla Phádraig, founding director Sigmar Recruitment:   Sigmar Recruitment today reports a record high number of job placements for Q3 (July, August, September) 2021, up 44% on the same period 2020. The figures released today top previous results recorded in Q2, 2021, with September recording the best single month ever in the 20-year history of Sigmar. Job orders in the first two weeks in October are trending higher than any single full month in the company’s 20-year history.   The first half of the year saw strong, consistent growth with job placements, peaking initially in May. Summer months remained as strong, peaking once more in September. Robert Mac Giolla Phádraig, founding director of Sigmar believes that the request to return to the office in September has caused employees to revolt, as they do not wish to return to pre-pandemic conditions and practices..   Commenting on the tightening of the labour market, Mac Giolla Phádraig says: “Demand for talent has remained at an all-time high for the second quarter in our 20-year history. It was somewhat unusual not to see demand abate over the summer months. Indeed, demand continued to increase over the summer, resulting in September’s record results. The rate of job requests  in the first two weeks of October is unprecedented, indicating continued in Q4 and raises the question of the sustainability of talent supply.   “Remote working has literally opened up a world of new opportunity no longer bound by location which is creating significant churn in the professional skills market. This last 18 months has seen employees demand greater flexibility. The request to return to the office by employers in September has prompted employees to reconsider whether they recommit or resign. Many are resigning.”   Mac Giolla Phádraig likens remote work to long-distance relationships, which in many cases don’t work out. “We’ve gone from “living” with our employees in an office environment to long distance relationships, which often sees commitment recede over time. The context of location also opened up new experiences and possibilities on a scale never before seen. In September, many employers have asked employees to “trial” living together once more, which in some cases leads to a reunion or in others to separation.   "Another factor, on the employee side is that of identity and how what we do makes up part of who we are as individuals. “This last 18 months has asked big questions of us all, mainly how our working lives interact with our lives and how we identify with our working lives. In the absence of a workplace we’ve reassessed the balance between who we are and what we do, resulting in lesser commitment to our working selves and therefore to our employers. Employee loyalty has therefore become increasingly under question with many workers are now committed to the experience of work over the employer, adding further to the current levels of churn.”     Talent Shortage Economy Recruitment for both the on-site and remote talent remains the single largest threat to the Irish economy. Says Mac Giolla Phádraig: ”We are seeing two macro trends converge at once, compounding demand for talent across all sectors – (1) supply of labour and (2)shortage of skills.”   The “high touch economy” for on-site labour in sectors such as construction, logistics, retail and hospitality are currently experiencing severe labour shortages. The disruption to international talent supply chains have caused significant bottlenecks to the supply of labour,  particularly effecting on-site, lower skilled jobs. On-going travel restrictions and pace vaccine rollout continue to impede immigration globally, but as an island nation we are now seeing the impact of this as demand recovers at pace.   The “low-touch economy”, on the other hand, where remote work is viable is experiencing greater churn due to the expansion of opportunity for skilled workers, shift in motivation, identity and desire for flexibility. This is now being experienced more acutely in Ireland as offices re-open and employees now vote with their feet, in choosing to resign over reengaging with employers in many cases. Demand has been particularly strong in IT, Financial Services and Life Sciences.    He adds: “If we thought the war for talent was tough, just wait for the battle of attrition. Retaining workers rather than attracting them is now emerging as the number one challenge for businesses across the globe.”  

Job Activity0

Irish jobs market reaches 20-year high, as office re-entry drives unprecedented levels of recruitment activity

Irish jobs market reaches 20-year high, as office re-entry drives unprecedented levels of recruitment activity

Sigmar Recruitment today reports a record high number of job placements over April, May, and June 2021. The number of placements during this period is higher than any other quarter in the recruitment company’s 20-year history. Current figures are up 6% on the previous record set in 2019 before the pandemic. As one of the largest recruiters in Ireland, Sigmar has offices across the country and is present in all professional sectors. The first half of the year saw strong, consistent growth with job placements breaking all records in the month of May, with June accounting for the second-highest month ever. Commenting on the rebound of the labour market, Sigmar founding Director, Robert Mac Giolla Phádraig says: “The jobs market in Ireland has never been stronger or more buoyant than it currently is. We’re seeing several macro trends converge all at once, which is creating significant churn in the market. Remote working has literally opened up a world of new opportunities no longer bound by location. This is coupled with a rising tide of consumer confidence, as many professionals find themselves in a stronger financial position than before the pandemic. “The last 18 months has asked big questions of us all, and the humdrum of lockdown has created a desire for change which is now resulting in unprecedented numbers of people moving jobs. Employee loyalty is increasingly under question, with remote work being less enjoyable, many workers are now committed to the experience of work over the employer, adding further to the current levels of churn.” IT accounted for one-third of all job placements throughout the quarter, followed in order by Financial Services, Sales & Marketing, Accountancy, Life Science & Manufacturing, Office Support, Public Sector, Construction, Professional Services. Business confidence has also grown steadily over the course of the year, as vaccination gathered momentum. The “low-touch economy” is booming is sectors such as e-commerce, digital, and logistics. Says Mac Giolla Phádraig: “The resurgence of permanent recruitment is somewhat unique to how we’ve rebounded from previous downturns, where we typically saw flexible work return quicker.” Although the vast majority of job placement in Q2 were understandably remote, Sigmar reports that the tide is beginning to change with the majority of employers now committing to hybrid work over the coming three months. Mac Giolla Phádraig advises: “As we now choose our workplaces, at a time when the power dynamic has shifted to the employee, employers need to ensure adequate work practices to reconnect the workforce with the workplace equitably. There is an inherent risk that new workforce inequities may emerge, such as “proximity bias”, where those closest to the centre of influence get greater recognition and therefore promotion opportunities as opposed to remote workers. When it comes to individual contribution the opposite could be argued that remote workers get the benefit of having less in-office distractions and their output is therefore greater.” Mac Giolla Phádraig likens remote work to long-distance relationships, which in many cases don’t work out. “We’ve gone from “living” with our employees in an office environment to long-distance relationships, which often sees commitment recede over time. The context of location also opens up new experiences and possibilities, which are now being explored on a scale never before seen.” He adds, “if we thought the war for talent was tough, just wait for the battle of attrition. It’s now emerging as the number one challenge for businesses across the globe.”