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how to interview someone

How To Interview Someone For A Job (Part 2) | How To Structure And Control An Interview

how to interview someone

Last week we looked at how to plan an interview. In the second of our four part series on interview tips for interviewers we will look at how to structure and control an interview.

 

Structuring an Interview

1. Introduce interviewers and explain the format of the interview.

2. Check that the candidate is clear about the job and give information about the organisation and the terms and conditions of service.

3. Ask the candidate to explain his/her interest in the job and suitability for it.

4. Clarify information in the candidate’s application form or CV.

5. Seek additional information about the candidate’s skills, experience and other details relevant to the person specification.

6. Ask the candidate further questions in order to assess the extent to which s/he meets the criteria in the person specification.

7. Give the candidate an opportunity to ask questions or to add any points or further information.

8. Tell the candidate when to expect information on the outcome.

9. Thank the candidate and close the interview.

 

Controlling an Interview

These points provide a good framework for conducting effective and consistent employment interviews. However, in order for it to help you obtain the information you need to make a sound employment decision; you must have control over the interview.

 

Establishing and maintaining control of the interview requires effective listening combined with good questioning techniques. You need to bear the following points in mind:

  • The key to effective listening is for you to do minimal talking during the interview.
  • After establishing rapport and describing the job and its requirements to the candidate, let the candidate do most of the talking.
  • It is important that you pay attention to the candidate. Do not let your mind wander or think ahead to the next question instead of listening to what the candidate is saying.
  • Occasionally, restating a candidate’s reply or observation in your own words may be useful.
  • As noted previously, it is always a good technique to ask questions that require more than a simple “yes” or “no” answer. Your questioning should encourage the candidate to communicate information that will shed light on his or her capability to perform the job effectively.

Posted by Recruitment Consultant, Sigmar on 7 December 2017

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One study found their average meeting length was reduced by 25% when participants were standing throughout. 4. Act, Don’t React It’s easy to let your day be dictated by phone calls and emails, putting out fires with every response. While this reactionary attitude is a great way to simply ‘cope’, it stops you making headway of your own with projects that require you to be proactive in how you handle them. While it’s difficult to ignore a pop-up notification or a blaring ring tone, carving out time in your schedule when everybody knows not to disturb you, or turn your notifications off. 5. Delegate Many busy leaders tend to believe it’s quicker to complete a task themselves (and definitely get it right first time) rather than explain the task to a co-worker and have them complete it (maybe not quite right first time). This can result in complete overwork on the part of the leader, and perhaps an unhealthy environment of mistrust or micromanagement in the workspace. Instead, consider assigning tasks to colleagues based on their strengths, and take the time to explain to them clearly what exactly you’re looking for from them. You might be pleasantly surprised when they do it as well, or better, than you could! 6. Stay Healthy One of the most effective ways to increase your productivity is to keep your brain in top shape. Some things you can do to maintain energy levels and sharp thinking are: Get a good night’s sleep Stay hydrated Keep healthy, nutritious snacks in your desk drawer Exercise regularly, particularly in your breaks Take a full lunch break Don’t take work home with you when you can avoid it 7. Take…Breaks? Taking breaks to improve productivity sounds somewhat counterintuitive. However, scientists have suggested that taking regular mental rests from work actually makes us more productive in the long run. 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