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10 Types Of Leadership Styles

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1. Autocratic

An autocratic leader is one who dictates all policies and procedures. Employees and team members have no say whatsoever in how things are done and are expected to follow the command and control of the leader.

 

2. Coaching

This leadership style is about helping others to improve themselves and achieve their goals. They are there to provide guidance and counsel. This leadership style can only work if the follower is open to being advised.

 

3. Charismatic

A charismatic leader is one often adored by their followers. Their undoubtable charisma and personality may lead people to follow their every word. They can be sometimes viewed as manipulative because their intentions may be often self-focused.

 

4. Transformational

Transformational leadership is where a leader works with teams to identify a change that is needed, creates a vision and then guides their followers by inspiring them. A transformational leader won’t only assign tasks and goals but allow teams/ direct reports to decide their own goals to align with the overall company objectives.

 

5. Laissez-Faire

This leadership style gives employees complete free reign with little or no supervision. This can lead to low productivity among staff.

 

6. Affiliative

An affiliative leader promotes harmony among his or her followers and helps to resolve any conflict. This type of leader will also build teams and ensure their followers feel connected to one other.

 

7. Visionary

This type of leader inspires others and really drives progression. They would be well respected among their peers and colleagues and they strive to encourage confidence in their direct reports and other colleagues.

 

8. Bureaucratic

The bureaucratic leadership style was first described by Max Weber in 1947. The bureaucratic style is based on following normative rules and adhering to lines of authority. Bureaucratic leaders are similar to autocratic leaders in that they expect their team members to follow the rules and procedures precisely as instructed.

 

9. Transactional

This form of leadership would be seen in a sales environment. Leaders will incentivise goals and give teams targets to achieve in order to gain reward. The incentive will usually be in the form of monetary and will be granted to staff if tasks are completed or if they reach the top 10 performers.

 

10. Democratic Leadership

This type of leader is one that takes on board what other people have to say. A democratic leader allows and even encourages others to participate in decision making.

 

Do you see any similarities in these leadership styles and the one in your company? Or do you recognise yourself as one of these leaders?

Understanding these styles of leadership is a great way to realise what works and what doesn't in your company. It helps you to know the outcomes you want to achieve. Each leadership style encourages different types of performances so it’s good to know what one works best for you.

Posted by Clare Reynolds on 11 July 2019

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