Connecting...

W1siziisijiwmtgvmtavmtevmdgvntgvmjgvntgyl0fydgjvyxjkidetmtawlmpwzyjdlfsiccisinrodw1iiiwimjawmhg1mdbcdtawm2mixv0

Five Ways To Impress Your Boss

W1siziisijiwmtgvmtavmtevmdkvmdevmzuvodevqxj0ym9hcmqgms0xmdauanbnil0swyjwiiwidgh1bwiilci2mdb4mzawxhuwmdnjil1d

This may come as a shock, no one expects you to be perfect and know everything, even your boss!

Sometimes you may feel like you’re not good enough and worry that you can’t impress your manager, but it is actually easier than you think and you’re probably doing some of these things already…

1. Dress to Impress

Make sure your personal hygiene is impeccable. One of the worst office offences is bad body odour. Once you have your personal hygiene in check, dress smart. Dressing well will impress your superiors and your fellow colleagues. It will also give a little extra confidence while you do your day to day tasks.


2. Timekeeping

Traffic, public transport, school runs, they can be a nightmare in the mornings and we’ve all been there, but it’s no excuse to be late for work constantly. Want to make a good impression? Be on time! Even if it means you have to leave earlier in the morning. If you want to impress your boss, you have to make real effort and show you are reliable. Bad time-keeping is a pet hate for managers.

Remember: When you are late, show you understand that time-keeping and attendance matters and always inform your manager that you’re late. A quick text or phone call can really make all the difference.


3. Socialise

If you want to impress at work, get involved in social events with your colleagues. It’s important for managers to see you gel with the rest of the staff and integrate with the culture of the business. If there isn’t a social scene in work why not try to organise something yourself? You could suggest after work drinks, a running club, a book club? Getting involved is impressive to a boss, but if you can organise your own social activity, that will definitely get your managers attention.


4. Share Ideas

Don’t be afraid to tell your boss about ideas you have. Managers appreciate someone who takes their own initiative and wants to help improve things. It’s a great way for your boss to know you care about your role and the company and that you want to make it even better by putting your stamp on things.


5. Be Prepared

Always be prepared to work. When you come in in the morning be ready to hit the ground running. When you attend meetings have all the relevant information and documents needed.

Remember, you’ve been appointed this role and if your boss sees you struggling in it, it’s not going to impress him/her. Always being prepared and showing your boss you can manage your task will impress your boss and even increase your opportunity for a promotion.


It’s always good to remember, not everyone is perfect, and your boss doesn’t expect you to be. Trying your best should always be enough to impress your boss. All a boss wants is an employee who’s working hard and is happy in the company and with the work they do.

Posted by Clare Reynolds on 11 October 2018

Sign up for HR & Recruitment Insights Weekely Email

Get a weekly email filled with content about GDPR, Recruitment, Hiring, Employer Branding and Company Culture direct to your inbox.

Sign up for our Jobseeking Tips & Advice Weekly Email

Get jobhunting tips, productivity hacks and career planning advice direct to your inbox.

Related Content

W1siziisijiwmtgvmtavmtevmdkvmdevmzuvodevqxj0ym9hcmqgms0xmdauanbnil0swyjwiiwidgh1bwiilci0mdb4mjywiyjdxq

Five Ways To Impress Your Boss

Five Ways To Impress Your Boss

This may come as a shock, no one expects you to be perfect and know everything, even your boss! Sometimes you may feel like you’re not good enough and worry that you can’t impress your manager, but it is actually easier than you think and you’re probably doing some of these things already… 1. Dress to Impress Make sure your personal hygiene is impeccable. One of the worst office offences is bad body odour. Once you have your personal hygiene in check, dress smart. Dressing well will impress your superiors and your fellow colleagues. It will also give a little extra confidence while you do your day to day tasks. via GIPHY 2. Timekeeping Traffic, public transport, school runs, they can be a nightmare in the mornings and we’ve all been there, but it’s no excuse to be late for work constantly. Want to make a good impression? Be on time! Even if it means you have to leave earlier in the morning. If you want to impress your boss, you have to make real effort and show you are reliable. Bad time-keeping is a pet hate for managers. Remember: When you are late, show you understand that time-keeping and attendance matters and always inform your manager that you’re late. A quick text or phone call can really make all the difference. via GIPHY 3. Socialise If you want to impress at work, get involved in social events with your colleagues. It’s important for managers to see you gel with the rest of the staff and integrate with the culture of the business. If there isn’t a social scene in work why not try to organise something yourself? You could suggest after work drinks, a running club, a book club? Getting involved is impressive to a boss, but if you can organise your own social activity, that will definitely get your managers attention. via GIPHY 4. Share Ideas Don’t be afraid to tell your boss about ideas you have. Managers appreciate someone who takes their own initiative and wants to help improve things. It’s a great way for your boss to know you care about your role and the company and that you want to make it even better by putting your stamp on things. via GIPHY 5. Be Prepared Always be prepared to work. When you come in in the morning be ready to hit the ground running. When you attend meetings have all the relevant information and documents needed. Remember, you’ve been appointed this role and if your boss sees you struggling in it, it’s not going to impress him/her. Always being prepared and showing your boss you can manage your task will impress your boss and even increase your opportunity for a promotion. via GIPHY It’s always good to remember, not everyone is perfect, and your boss doesn’t expect you to be. Trying your best should always be enough to impress your boss. All a boss wants is an employee who’s working hard and is happy in the company and with the work they do.

W1siziisijiwmtgvmdgvmzavmtevndyvndmvmzywl2rpc25les02odayndzfmtkymc5qcgcixsxbinailcj0ahvtyiisijqwmhgynjajil1d

20 Disney Quotes That Will Inspire You To Succeed in Your Career

20 Disney Quotes That Will Inspire You To Succeed in Your Career

There's a lot of wisdom in Disney films so here are some of the best quotes to inspire you today.. "Venture outside your comfort zone. The rewards are worth it." - Rapunzel (Tangled) "All it takes is faith and trust." - Peter Pan (Peter Pan) "The flower that blooms in adversity is the most rare and beautiful of all." - The Emperor (Mulan) "Don't just fly, soar." - Dumbo (Dumbo) "In every job that must be done, there is an element of fun." - Mary Poppins (Mary Poppins) "Life's not a spectator sport. If watchin' is all you're gonna do, then you're gonna watch your life go by without ya" - Laverne (The Hunchback of Notre Dame) "The problem is not the problem. The problem is your attitude about the problem." - Jack Sparrow (Pirates of the Caribbean) "Believe you can, then you will." - Mulan (Princess Stories) "Today is a good day to try." - Quasimodo (The Hunchback of Notre Dame) "If you don't know where you want to go, then it doesn't matter which path you take" - The Cheshire Cat (Alice in Wonderland) "Admit defeat, and defeat will surely admit you into permanent custody" - Beret Girl (An Extremely Goofy Movie) "Oh yes, the past can hurt. But the way I see it, you can either run from it or learn from it" - Rafiki (The Lion King) "You're braver than you believe, and stronger than you seem, and smarter than you think" - Winnie the Pooh (Pooh's Most Grand Adventure) "Always let your conscience be your guide" - The Blue Fairy (Pinocchio) "Happiness is the richest thing we will ever own" - Donald Duck "Just because it's what's done, doesn't mean it's what should be done." - Cinderella (Cinderella) "Sometimes the right path is not the easiest one." - Grandmother Willow (Pocahontas) "The only thing predictable about life is its unpredictability." - Remy (Ratatouille) "Now, think of the happiest things. It's the same as having wings." - Peter Pan (Peter Pan) "All our dreams can come true, if we have the courage to pursue them." -- Walt Disney

W1siziisijiwmtgvmdyvmjyvmdkvndevmzgvntg2l0nhcmvlcibpbibtywxlcy5qcgvnil0swyjwiiwidgh1bwiilci0mdb4mjywiyjdxq

What Employers Really Want

What Employers Really Want

Are you in a recruitment process for a new job? If so, it's important to know what employers look for in a good candidate. Of course, things like qualifications, skills and experience are important but that’s not all employers want. If you've already been asked to interview, chances are your CV has already shown that you have the right qualifications, which is why you are being considered. Now, during the interview stage of the process, the hiring manager will be looking for a little more. Employers need to make sure that you will fit in at their organisation, match their company values and essentially be a part of their team. If you're feeling nervous about a job interview, it's good to remember these 5 things employers look for in an employee... 1. Positive Attitude Being upbeat and positive can make a huge difference. If you are a happy and positive person, a hiring manger will be confident that you will make friends easily and you will enjoy the work you do and even motivate others with your positivity. Being positive can make you approachable and make people want to work with you. 2. Dependable Employers seek someone who is trustworthy and reliable. It’s a crucial character trait in the workplace. Being on time for work and trusted to complete important tasks is what an employer expects from all their employees. 3. Enthusiastic About Learning A person who is eager to work and learn is very attractive to an employer. Showing you have a strong work ethic and are interested in upskilling and improving is exactly what any hiring manger wants. If you're interested in the company and want to invest in learning, your employer will be just as eager to invest in you too. 4. Quick Thinking A person who can react well when things go wrong is very useful to an employer. Having the ability to think on your feet in difficult situations can be of great benefit to any team/company. 5. Works Well In Teams ​ Getting along with people is a huge plus. Maintaining good working relationships and working well with others shows you are a team player and fit with a company’s culture.

W1siziisijiwmtcvmtivmdgvmtivnduvntmvndmwl0jhci1hdc13b3jrlmpwzwcixsxbinailcj0ahvtyiisijqwmhgynjajil1d

Free Bars Are Great – But Meaningful Work The Top Motivator For Candidates

Free Bars Are Great – But Meaningful Work The Top Motivator For Candidates

Most people think they are better at stuff than they actually are: driving, singing, telling jokes. Most companies suffer the same problem with their interview process. When a company and a candidate both think they are great and cannot be improved, you get the usual awkward interview where the candidate pretends to be somebody they’re not and the interviewer pretends they work for a different company. There are three elements that can help change that: interviews should ‘engage’ with candidates, they should be quick and they should fully reflect your company’s brand. With that in mind, these are my tips to make your interview process more efficient: Sell something meaningful Candidates are easier to find these days but harder to engage. There’s a lot of competition on the jobs market. When you’re recruiting a new hire, your company will be one of many that are looking for top talent. Nobody wants mediocre workers. Similarly, you’re not the only firm a candidate might consider. If they’re active in the marketplace, they’ll be applying for loads of jobs. If you’re a small firm, you might not have the fat salaries or free food that multinationals can offer, but you can sell something more meaningful in the interview. For example, you might have a really great training programme that’s respected in your industry. Tell candidates about it and what it could do for their careers. If you sell the genuine opportunities of working with your organisation, you’ll get a much better response and interviewees will compete harder for the role. Free food, gyms and bars on-site are great extras, but no one will join a company on these benefits alone – they want to do work that’s worthwhile. Meaningful work is the best motivator. Companies need to realise that they can stress that in their recruitment process and beat the big boys. ‘Creative’ questions Once the opportunity has been sold and the candidate is interested, you’d be amazed at how many firms miss obvious questions and ask things in interviews that have little to do with the role on offer. Say you have a job in advertising sales, you’ll have a lot of companies asking general questions around a candidate’s experience or set interview questions they think should be asked such as asking about their biggest failure. Instead, companies should be asking very practical questions about the candidate’s ability to do the job, like how good they are at selling ads. Ask them about what targets they achieved in their previous role, who they sold ads to, that kind of thing. Specific questions will allow candidates to showcase their skills, and they’ll be much more enthusiastic about answering them. I had a client recently who went for a job at a well-known e-commerce business. Both the attitude and the timing of their questions was all wrong. For about two hours, they asked him fairly negative questions about things like the times he had failed, but they didn’t give him much of an opportunity to show off his past experience. It didn’t reflect the brand they were selling. They came across as very stiff and not a very nice place to work. Needless to say, he lost interest pretty quickly. Candidates should always see the point behind your line of questioning.The tech sector in particular is prone to asking ‘creative’ questions like: How many red cars do you think there are in Ireland? The idea is to see how candidates deal with a problem they’ve never encountered and have no frame of reference for. That’s fine, but you need to earn the right to ask those types of questions. If a potential hire comes through the door and is bombarded with really weird questions without context or reason, you will get a weak response. Again, if you have shown the opportunity on offer and given an explanation as to why you are asking the strange questions people will see it as a challenge and give it their all. Quick turnaround The longer people are left in the recruitment process, the longer they’re open to new opportunities. If you like a candidate, you’d better be quick. Don’t let time make the decision for you. Arrange interviews 24 hours after you’ve closed applications. When you interview somebody, get back to them within a week with the next stage, whatever it is. Either bring them in for a follow-up or get them out of the process. There’s nothing worse than going for an interview and hearing nothing. If candidates don’t hear from you, they’ll lose interest and start looking elsewhere. Think of it from your point of view. If a candidate didn’t get back to you for ages when you offered them a second interview, you’d see it as a red flag that they weren’t interested. The whole process should take two or three weeks. That’s ideal. Double standards There can be lots of double standards like that in the interview process. For example, if you arrange an interview with somebody at 10am, don’t have them waiting around for 15 minutes. Tardiness wouldn’t be tolerated at the company so don’t tolerate it from yourself. I also think if you expect somebody to wear business attire to the interview, you should wear it yourself. It’s gas, you’ll see the coolest companies in the world where everybody wears sandals and T-shirts, but if someone shows up to an interview without a tie, they turn their noses up at them. If you can only offer a six-month contract, be prepared to look at people who might have had a lot of different jobs. They might have worked a lot of six-month contracts like the one you’re offering, so there’s no point ruling them if they’ve moved around a lot. Finally, I’d say that if you’re serious about finding top talent, you should be flexible about when you can arrange interviews. A prized candidate is probably busy being successful between nine and five, so be prepared to interview them outside normal working hours or on weekends. It doesn’t make sense if you’re pitching your brand as laid back, but you have a very strict interview schedule.