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World Employment Confederation Conference, Dublin | Event for HR Leaders

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The 2018 World Employment Confederation Conference will bring together a widely ranged high-calibre keynote speaker line-up, drawing from experts from employment and recruitment, HR practitioners, academics and policy makers in order to explore the rise of the an extended, just-in-time workforce and to seize new approaches and opportunities. This 3 day conference takes place in Dublin from June 6th-8th 2018.

 

Why attend?   

Topics and sessions include:

  • How to retain and attract new talent
  • How to prepare for the Gig Economy in this new World of Work
  • How to get your business investment ready
  • How to grow internationally
  • How to deal with an increasingly sophisticated Supply Chain in recruitment
  • How to implement strategies to close skill gaps and avoid negative business impacts
  • How to lead your team depending on the situation
  • How to ensure that project based workers are as engaged and as performing as the permanent workforce
  • How to build new forms of security and predictability for remote and independent workers
  • How to avoid legal risks associated with the use of self-employed workers
     

 

Speakers

LinkedIn will present their most recent Global Trends Report and what the future holds for the Gig economy and the “New World of Work” while Google HR director Helen Tynan will give a “ Peek inside Google” of their diversity journey. Sigmar COO and President of the National Recruitment  Frank Farrelly and Sigmar CCO Robert Mac Giolla Phadraig will both be speaking at the event alongside David McWilliams, Fons Trompeenaars, James Obsourne, Johnny Campbell, Dr. Peter Lovatt and many others.

See the line up of speakers from around the globe in the event brochure.

 

 


Tickets

For tickets visit their website

Group discount available - contact jackie@nrf.ie

 

 

About the World Employment Confederation

The World Employment Confederation is the global body for recruitment Federations. Ireland (NRF) has been an active member of this Confederation for the past 20 years. The Confederations annual conference is held in a different country every year with Ireland being the proud host this year. The National Recruitment Federation (NRF) tendered in 2016 to host this event to provide for its members the opportunity to network, and learn from our global peers. The NRF in collaboration with the World Employment Confederation are bringing together a conference like Ireland has never seen before of this scale for recruiters and HR personnel. Last year it was held in France and with India, Canada, Italy, The UK and Belgium also recent hosts we are very proud to be counted amongst these countries as front runners for expertise and thought leadership in this industry. 


Beating off stiff global competition we are delighted to have the opportunity to showcase not only the recruitment Industry and how we have progressed to be a country of thought leaders in this space, but also to promote Ireland INC to the rest of the World. 

 

 

Posted by Jamie Harnett on 18 May 2018

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Resignations Surge in September as Offices Re-open

Resignations Surge in September as Offices Re-open

Main Points Q3 record breaking recruitment placement results Highest in 20 years, peaking in September Up 44% for same period in 2020 Job orders in the first half of October are trending higher than any previous single month in company 20-year history The Talent Shortage Economy: Recruitment (for on-site labour and remote skills) is the single biggest threat to the Irish economy War for talent now being fought on two fronts: Battle for Retention internally and the Skills Struggle externally    “The Great Return is causing a Mass Exodus. The reopening of offices in September has prompted a new surge in resignations as Ireland now faces a Talent Crisis. Employers are increasingly requesting in-office presence and Employees are voting with their feet..” says Robert Mac Giolla Phádraig, founding director Sigmar Recruitment:   Sigmar Recruitment today reports a record high number of job placements for Q3 (July, August, September) 2021, up 44% on the same period 2020. The figures released today top previous results recorded in Q2, 2021, with September recording the best single month ever in the 20-year history of Sigmar. Job orders in the first two weeks in October are trending higher than any single full month in the company’s 20-year history.   The first half of the year saw strong, consistent growth with job placements, peaking initially in May. Summer months remained as strong, peaking once more in September. Robert Mac Giolla Phádraig, founding director of Sigmar believes that the request to return to the office in September has caused employees to revolt, as they do not wish to return to pre-pandemic conditions and practices..   Commenting on the tightening of the labour market, Mac Giolla Phádraig says: “Demand for talent has remained at an all-time high for the second quarter in our 20-year history. It was somewhat unusual not to see demand abate over the summer months. Indeed, demand continued to increase over the summer, resulting in September’s record results. The rate of job requests  in the first two weeks of October is unprecedented, indicating continued in Q4 and raises the question of the sustainability of talent supply.   “Remote working has literally opened up a world of new opportunity no longer bound by location which is creating significant churn in the professional skills market. This last 18 months has seen employees demand greater flexibility. The request to return to the office by employers in September has prompted employees to reconsider whether they recommit or resign. Many are resigning.”   Mac Giolla Phádraig likens remote work to long-distance relationships, which in many cases don’t work out. “We’ve gone from “living” with our employees in an office environment to long distance relationships, which often sees commitment recede over time. The context of location also opened up new experiences and possibilities on a scale never before seen. In September, many employers have asked employees to “trial” living together once more, which in some cases leads to a reunion or in others to separation.   "Another factor, on the employee side is that of identity and how what we do makes up part of who we are as individuals. “This last 18 months has asked big questions of us all, mainly how our working lives interact with our lives and how we identify with our working lives. In the absence of a workplace we’ve reassessed the balance between who we are and what we do, resulting in lesser commitment to our working selves and therefore to our employers. Employee loyalty has therefore become increasingly under question with many workers are now committed to the experience of work over the employer, adding further to the current levels of churn.”     Talent Shortage Economy Recruitment for both the on-site and remote talent remains the single largest threat to the Irish economy. Says Mac Giolla Phádraig: ”We are seeing two macro trends converge at once, compounding demand for talent across all sectors – (1) supply of labour and (2)shortage of skills.”   The “high touch economy” for on-site labour in sectors such as construction, logistics, retail and hospitality are currently experiencing severe labour shortages. The disruption to international talent supply chains have caused significant bottlenecks to the supply of labour,  particularly effecting on-site, lower skilled jobs. On-going travel restrictions and pace vaccine rollout continue to impede immigration globally, but as an island nation we are now seeing the impact of this as demand recovers at pace.   The “low-touch economy”, on the other hand, where remote work is viable is experiencing greater churn due to the expansion of opportunity for skilled workers, shift in motivation, identity and desire for flexibility. This is now being experienced more acutely in Ireland as offices re-open and employees now vote with their feet, in choosing to resign over reengaging with employers in many cases. Demand has been particularly strong in IT, Financial Services and Life Sciences.    He adds: “If we thought the war for talent was tough, just wait for the battle of attrition. Retaining workers rather than attracting them is now emerging as the number one challenge for businesses across the globe.”