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Sir Ken Robinson's Keynote Speech at Talent Summit 2018

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Sir Ken Robinson, one of the world’s leading thinkers on creativity and innovation in the workplace spoke at Talent Summit 2018. As an advisor to Fortune 500 companies and governments in Europe, Asia and the United States, Sir Ken Robinson helps transform organisations’ corporate culture to focus more on fostering and developing creativity. His New York Times best-selling books also help people tap into their creative potential.

 

His ideas and research have made him a popular speaker on TED Talks. In fact, his 2006 and 2010 presentations have been seen by more than 350 million people in 160 countries, making Robinson the most-viewed speaker in the history of Ted.com.

 

 

Talent Summit was held in the Convention Centre, Dublin on the 22nd February 2018. Founded by Sigmar Recruitment, Talent Summit has grown to become one of the largest HR & Leadership conferences in Europe, showcasing the latest thinking on talent topics from around the world. Its mission is to share thought leadership on talent to build better workplaces and working lives in an increasingly complex world of work.

 

Talent Summit 2018 Speakers included:

  • Sir Ken Robinson - Worlds No. 1 TedTalk Speaker
  • Dr Peter Lovatt - Dance Psychologist, University of Hertfordshire
  • Johnny Campbell - CEO, Social Talent
  • Dennis Layton - Global Deputy Leader, People Advisory Services, EY
  • Karen Ní Bhróin - Conductor in Training, RTÉ Choirs, Orchestras and Quartets
  • David Barrett - Chief Commercial Officer, cut-e
  • Rob Williams - Director of Employer Insights, Indeed

 

Find out more about upcoming events on www.talentsummit.ie

 

 

Posted by Clare Reynolds on 26 April 2018

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