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HR Jobs - Market Overview 2018

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“Businesses embracing HR strategy again to future-proof their business”


Thoughts on the Market

Not since pre-recession times has the Dublin HR jobs market been this strong, with increasing choice for candidates looking to move. The rest of the country, however, is experiencing a more gradual pace of job growth, while some niche areas of the job market like training and development and talent acquisition are seeing a marked increase. In the capital, it’s a positive landscape for both HR graduates and returning expats, who are being snapped up at the moment. An interesting trend is the big focus organisations are placing on HR strategy. In a strong economy for businesses to compete, their people strategy is key to enabling them to retain employees and out-perform their competitors. This is demonstrated by the prominence of talent management, organisational development, retention and employee engagement on job descriptions from HR business partner level upwards. 


Senior Roles

The volume of senior vacancies and the salaries they are commanding is steadily increasing. However, due to a lack of these roles during the recession, there are multiple candidates applying for these jobs so competition can be fierce. At the senior end, there has been a steady increase in the number of jobs offering between €70-90k. At the 90k + end there are limited options and an active jobseeker in this space will experience long and slow processes. 


Graduates Getting Jobs Again

Gone are the days when you needed a minimum of two internships to get a look in at a junior HR role. Not to say that all graduates are walking into their desired job after college, but there are significantly fewer barriers. Any relevant internships are still an advantage. The key for graduates is to promote their abilities with technology and systems and the flexibility to do the grunt work.


Temps

HR teams are busy and under pressure. They come under pressure during holiday periods, recruitment ramp-ups and project implementations in particular. As a result, HR teams are taking on temps to ease the burden. Any duration between two weeks to three months is the typical temp time period, with many then rolling on beyond this. 


Availability for Contracts

There are far fewer people readily available for contract roles. So it is becoming increasingly challenging to get cover for maternity and sick leaves. This means your lead in time-to-hire needs to be longer and you need to pay a premium and consider a completion bonus to retain the employee for the duration of the contract.


Public Sector Opportunities

With public sector employment opening up, there are considerably more permanent and longer-term contracts available. Previous public sector HR experience will mean you are well placed to look for jobs within public sector, semi-State and similar industries.


Offers

The companies who are securing ‘acceptances’ are being smart. They have quick processes, ensure they are selling the job to candidates and are frequently offering a package above candidates’ salary expectations. In a jobs market where most candidates are securing at least two job offers, the candidate needs to be clear on the reason to choose you. A high offer may reduce the risk of a candidate pursuing additional processes and close out the process smoothly and quickly. 


Salaries

Companies are offering above candidates’ salary expectations in order to secure hires. There has been a significant increase in junior salaries in particular. €28k is the new acceptable graduate salary to live and work in Dublin. 


Top Tip for 2018

Get diverse industry experience. Industry specific HR demand in financial services, technology, public sector and start-ups.


Looking for a HR job? Check out our latest jobs here



Posted by Kate Stewart on 26 April 2018

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“Businesses embracing HR strategy again to future-proof their business” Thoughts on the Market Not since pre-recession times has the Dublin HR jobs market been this strong, with increasing choice for candidates looking to move. The rest of the country, however, is experiencing a more gradual pace of job growth, while some niche areas of the job market like training and development and talent acquisition are seeing a marked increase. In the capital, it’s a positive landscape for both HR graduates and returning expats, who are being snapped up at the moment. An interesting trend is the big focus organisations are placing on HR strategy. In a strong economy for businesses to compete, their people strategy is key to enabling them to retain employees and out-perform their competitors. This is demonstrated by the prominence of talent management, organisational development, retention and employee engagement on job descriptions from HR business partner level upwards. Senior Roles The volume of senior vacancies and the salaries they are commanding is steadily increasing. However, due to a lack of these roles during the recession, there are multiple candidates applying for these jobs so competition can be fierce. At the senior end, there has been a steady increase in the number of jobs offering between €70-90k. At the 90k + end there are limited options and an active jobseeker in this space will experience long and slow processes. Graduates Getting Jobs Again Gone are the days when you needed a minimum of two internships to get a look in at a junior HR role. Not to say that all graduates are walking into their desired job after college, but there are significantly fewer barriers. Any relevant internships are still an advantage. The key for graduates is to promote their abilities with technology and systems and the flexibility to do the grunt work. Temps HR teams are busy and under pressure. They come under pressure during holiday periods, recruitment ramp-ups and project implementations in particular. As a result, HR teams are taking on temps to ease the burden. Any duration between two weeks to three months is the typical temp time period, with many then rolling on beyond this. Availability for Contracts There are far fewer people readily available for contract roles. So it is becoming increasingly challenging to get cover for maternity and sick leaves. This means your lead in time-to-hire needs to be longer and you need to pay a premium and consider a completion bonus to retain the employee for the duration of the contract. Public Sector Opportunities With public sector employment opening up, there are considerably more permanent and longer-term contracts available. Previous public sector HR experience will mean you are well placed to look for jobs within public sector, semi-State and similar industries. Offers The companies who are securing ‘acceptances’ are being smart. They have quick processes, ensure they are selling the job to candidates and are frequently offering a package above candidates’ salary expectations. In a jobs market where most candidates are securing at least two job offers, the candidate needs to be clear on the reason to choose you. A high offer may reduce the risk of a candidate pursuing additional processes and close out the process smoothly and quickly. Salaries Companies are offering above candidates’ salary expectations in order to secure hires. There has been a significant increase in junior salaries in particular. €28k is the new acceptable graduate salary to live and work in Dublin. Top Tip for 2018 Get diverse industry experience. Industry specific HR demand in financial services, technology, public sector and start-ups. Looking for a HR job? Check out our latest jobs here

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Either way increased two-way ongoing communication should lead to a more open and honest relationship between a manager and their employee, a workforce that are motivated and understand their role within the larger organisation as well as a more productive and effective performance by the individual, the team and the company. More and more we are seeing a shift away the annual appraisal system. It can be a costly and timely exercise. Where they are done due to process, employees can end up feeling dissatisfied rather than more engaged. Performance management is increasingly deemed to be an ongoing process and not an annual event. An employee can easily go on the defensive when something is brought up at their annual review that was never mentioned to them before. Likewise the employee could highlight issues to the manager, which if given the opportunity could have been discussed and resolved months earlier. 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No matter what terms are used to describe it: coaching, feedback, goal setting, measuring performance, development etc., the common trend is that companies are striving to make performance management ingrained in the daily culture of the organisation and the actions of its employees and management. This may or may not be coupled with a formal annual appraisal system, with or without a ratings system. Either way increased two-way ongoing communication should lead to a more open and honest relationship between a manager and their employee, a workforce that are motivated and understand their role within the larger organisation as well as a more productive and effective performance by the individual, the team and the company.