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Why Good Employees Quit Their Jobs

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It’s the dreaded words that no manager wants to hear from a good employee, “I quit”. All employers want to keep their talented staff for as long as possible. Not only is the turnover of staff expensive it is also difficult to find good replacements, along with the uncertainty of how they will work out. Sometimes there are reasons that an employee may leave, that you unfortunately can’t prevent such as personal reasons, or they have been offered an opportunity that was too good to let pass by.

However, often there are other reasons that are preventable, below are some of the most common reasons.

 

No Opportunities For Promotion

Every employee wants the chance to better themselves and get ahead in the company they are working in. However, employers can often just focus on getting the work done and ensuring targets are met. If a member of staff feels that they are not going anywhere in the company, they will look elsewhere for better opportunities.

Therefore it is important for managers to take the time to talk to their staff with regards to their career progression and where they would like to see themselves going in the company.

 

They Are Overworked

It can be easy for managers to overwork their best employees, however this can be counterproductive. It can make employees feel like they are being punished or that they are being loaded with too many responsibilities without getting the pay or title to go along with it.

 

They Don’t Like Their Boss

It is not necessary for employees and their manager to be friends, but it is important that there is a relationship there. The boss is too much a part of an employee’s daily life at work to have an awkward or uncomfortable relationship. Having a bad relationship with a manager can discourage staff members from doing a good job.

 

Commitments Aren’t Honoured

Managers can often promise their employees the sun, moon and stars, however they don’t always follow through on their promises. This can be extremely frustrating for employees when they have put in the work and effort but are not rewarded with the promotion or raise that they were promised. Making empty promises to good employees can often result in them finding work elsewhere.

 

They Are Bored

No one wants to be unchallenged or bored with the work that they do. Employees that perform well, need to be challenged in their work and given the chance to develop their skills. By giving employees more meaningful work, they use more of their skills and can often find better ways to get things done. If staff do not get to engage creatively, they are more likely to become restless in the job and begin looking for a more stimulating job elsewhere.

 

The important thing to remember when trying to retain top staff, is communication. Think about how you treat your staff and if you would be happy in their position. Often factors for employees leaving are preventable, therefore it is important to be actively developing staff members as much as possible. Good employees have the talent that gives them plenty of other options, so make sure they want to stay working for you.

Posted by Recruitment Consultant, Sigmar on 7 December 2017

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Resignations Surge in September as Offices Re-open

Resignations Surge in September as Offices Re-open

Main Points Q3 record breaking recruitment placement results Highest in 20 years, peaking in September Up 44% for same period in 2020 Job orders in the first half of October are trending higher than any previous single month in company 20-year history The Talent Shortage Economy: Recruitment (for on-site labour and remote skills) is the single biggest threat to the Irish economy War for talent now being fought on two fronts: Battle for Retention internally and the Skills Struggle externally    “The Great Return is causing a Mass Exodus. The reopening of offices in September has prompted a new surge in resignations as Ireland now faces a Talent Crisis. Employers are increasingly requesting in-office presence and Employees are voting with their feet..” says Robert Mac Giolla Phádraig, founding director Sigmar Recruitment:   Sigmar Recruitment today reports a record high number of job placements for Q3 (July, August, September) 2021, up 44% on the same period 2020. The figures released today top previous results recorded in Q2, 2021, with September recording the best single month ever in the 20-year history of Sigmar. Job orders in the first two weeks in October are trending higher than any single full month in the company’s 20-year history.   The first half of the year saw strong, consistent growth with job placements, peaking initially in May. Summer months remained as strong, peaking once more in September. Robert Mac Giolla Phádraig, founding director of Sigmar believes that the request to return to the office in September has caused employees to revolt, as they do not wish to return to pre-pandemic conditions and practices..   Commenting on the tightening of the labour market, Mac Giolla Phádraig says: “Demand for talent has remained at an all-time high for the second quarter in our 20-year history. It was somewhat unusual not to see demand abate over the summer months. Indeed, demand continued to increase over the summer, resulting in September’s record results. The rate of job requests  in the first two weeks of October is unprecedented, indicating continued in Q4 and raises the question of the sustainability of talent supply.   “Remote working has literally opened up a world of new opportunity no longer bound by location which is creating significant churn in the professional skills market. This last 18 months has seen employees demand greater flexibility. The request to return to the office by employers in September has prompted employees to reconsider whether they recommit or resign. Many are resigning.”   Mac Giolla Phádraig likens remote work to long-distance relationships, which in many cases don’t work out. “We’ve gone from “living” with our employees in an office environment to long distance relationships, which often sees commitment recede over time. The context of location also opened up new experiences and possibilities on a scale never before seen. In September, many employers have asked employees to “trial” living together once more, which in some cases leads to a reunion or in others to separation.   "Another factor, on the employee side is that of identity and how what we do makes up part of who we are as individuals. “This last 18 months has asked big questions of us all, mainly how our working lives interact with our lives and how we identify with our working lives. In the absence of a workplace we’ve reassessed the balance between who we are and what we do, resulting in lesser commitment to our working selves and therefore to our employers. Employee loyalty has therefore become increasingly under question with many workers are now committed to the experience of work over the employer, adding further to the current levels of churn.”     Talent Shortage Economy Recruitment for both the on-site and remote talent remains the single largest threat to the Irish economy. Says Mac Giolla Phádraig: ”We are seeing two macro trends converge at once, compounding demand for talent across all sectors – (1) supply of labour and (2)shortage of skills.”   The “high touch economy” for on-site labour in sectors such as construction, logistics, retail and hospitality are currently experiencing severe labour shortages. The disruption to international talent supply chains have caused significant bottlenecks to the supply of labour,  particularly effecting on-site, lower skilled jobs. On-going travel restrictions and pace vaccine rollout continue to impede immigration globally, but as an island nation we are now seeing the impact of this as demand recovers at pace.   The “low-touch economy”, on the other hand, where remote work is viable is experiencing greater churn due to the expansion of opportunity for skilled workers, shift in motivation, identity and desire for flexibility. This is now being experienced more acutely in Ireland as offices re-open and employees now vote with their feet, in choosing to resign over reengaging with employers in many cases. Demand has been particularly strong in IT, Financial Services and Life Sciences.    He adds: “If we thought the war for talent was tough, just wait for the battle of attrition. Retaining workers rather than attracting them is now emerging as the number one challenge for businesses across the globe.”