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graduate recruitment

The Changing Lanes Of Graduate Recruitment

graduate recruitment

Do you remember the days of placing a graduate advert online, receiving thousands of applications, spending weeks screening and interviewing, offering 20 people jobs (with all of them accepting) and most are still with you?

 

While this may have happened pre-Celtic Tiger, most normal companies out there are experiencing the very opposite: Spending a fortune on an advertising campaign, using “social media”, spending most of your working week with the colleges trying to be a bit more hip, receiving 11 relevant applications, inviting 30 (including non-relevant applications), 6 turn up, 4 get offered, one starts…

 

While this is a bit of an extreme example it’s designed to illustrate some of the frustrations employers are facing when recruiting graduates. Unfortunately, the market is saturated with companies looking for bright, clever and quirky graduates to join their business and the choice open to students these days means companies are getting more and more desperate in their attempts to secure the right talent. This in turn has created a very unhealthy culture in that graduates are often in the driving seat when it comes to decisions over which job to take.

 

This shows a level of commitment on their part and will mean an employee likely to stay with your business a lot longer. Here are some tips on how best to evaluate your graduate recruitment and ensure you target the right talent:

 

Career Site

Is your graduate career site linked to you main website and if so, how are candidates able to identify the graduate culture from that of the rest-of-the-business culture? Make sure your graduate career page is different, interesting and has content that will genuinely engage those who visit it. Video content and blog content are incredibly relevant to what graduates are looking for now

 

Social Media

Who runs your Facebook page? Have you got a LinkedIn Careers Page? When was the last time Twitter was updated? If you’re going to use Social Media, make sure your content is up to date and edgy. Students these days spend so much of their time glued to some form of device so they can interact more fluidly with your brand if ensure you update and blog as often as possible. Talk to your marketing team and get their buy in.

 

Culture

This is the one thing that can make or break a recruitment campaign so get this right from the beginning. When you’re interviewing a graduate, look at their motivations as well as their capabilities. If someone gives the impression they may not agree with your company’s ethos, then take a step back. A graduate represents the very foundation of your future business and is the cornerstone of your succession planning so if anything, culture should be your number one focus

 

Learning & Development

Is your graduate programme challenging enough? Students these days have jumped through so many academic hoops companies should be rejoicing in the fact that graduates are brighter and quicker off the mark than ever. Taking a look at your training schedule, give it a shake up and don’t be afraid to ask for a second opinion. If it works though leave it but you should always evaluate your programme every year to make sure you’re up to date with everyone else

 

Running a graduate programme doesn’t have to cost a fortune and you don’t need to spend a lot of time in designing it but ultimately it will cost more if you don’t get it right at the start so put the effort in, figure out what you want, who you need to help you and go for it. Graduate recruitment has become one of the top routes to growing your company and it can help you as a business grow both in terms of stability but also culture and diversity.

 

Marina Morrissey is Operations Manager for Sigmar Managed Services, the RPO division of Sigmar Recruitment Ireland. If you would like to find out more about the work carried out by her team, please feel free to contact direct at mmorrissey@sigmar.ie or +353 1 4744611.

Posted by Marina Morrissey, Manager of Managed Services Division Sigmar on 7 December 2017

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Resignations Surge in September as Offices Re-open

Resignations Surge in September as Offices Re-open

Main Points Q3 record breaking recruitment placement results Highest in 20 years, peaking in September Up 44% for same period in 2020 Job orders in the first half of October are trending higher than any previous single month in company 20-year history The Talent Shortage Economy: Recruitment (for on-site labour and remote skills) is the single biggest threat to the Irish economy War for talent now being fought on two fronts: Battle for Retention internally and the Skills Struggle externally    “The Great Return is causing a Mass Exodus. The reopening of offices in September has prompted a new surge in resignations as Ireland now faces a Talent Crisis. Employers are increasingly requesting in-office presence and Employees are voting with their feet..” says Robert Mac Giolla Phádraig, founding director Sigmar Recruitment:   Sigmar Recruitment today reports a record high number of job placements for Q3 (July, August, September) 2021, up 44% on the same period 2020. The figures released today top previous results recorded in Q2, 2021, with September recording the best single month ever in the 20-year history of Sigmar. Job orders in the first two weeks in October are trending higher than any single full month in the company’s 20-year history.   The first half of the year saw strong, consistent growth with job placements, peaking initially in May. Summer months remained as strong, peaking once more in September. Robert Mac Giolla Phádraig, founding director of Sigmar believes that the request to return to the office in September has caused employees to revolt, as they do not wish to return to pre-pandemic conditions and practices..   Commenting on the tightening of the labour market, Mac Giolla Phádraig says: “Demand for talent has remained at an all-time high for the second quarter in our 20-year history. It was somewhat unusual not to see demand abate over the summer months. Indeed, demand continued to increase over the summer, resulting in September’s record results. The rate of job requests  in the first two weeks of October is unprecedented, indicating continued in Q4 and raises the question of the sustainability of talent supply.   “Remote working has literally opened up a world of new opportunity no longer bound by location which is creating significant churn in the professional skills market. This last 18 months has seen employees demand greater flexibility. The request to return to the office by employers in September has prompted employees to reconsider whether they recommit or resign. Many are resigning.”   Mac Giolla Phádraig likens remote work to long-distance relationships, which in many cases don’t work out. “We’ve gone from “living” with our employees in an office environment to long distance relationships, which often sees commitment recede over time. The context of location also opened up new experiences and possibilities on a scale never before seen. In September, many employers have asked employees to “trial” living together once more, which in some cases leads to a reunion or in others to separation.   "Another factor, on the employee side is that of identity and how what we do makes up part of who we are as individuals. “This last 18 months has asked big questions of us all, mainly how our working lives interact with our lives and how we identify with our working lives. In the absence of a workplace we’ve reassessed the balance between who we are and what we do, resulting in lesser commitment to our working selves and therefore to our employers. Employee loyalty has therefore become increasingly under question with many workers are now committed to the experience of work over the employer, adding further to the current levels of churn.”     Talent Shortage Economy Recruitment for both the on-site and remote talent remains the single largest threat to the Irish economy. Says Mac Giolla Phádraig: ”We are seeing two macro trends converge at once, compounding demand for talent across all sectors – (1) supply of labour and (2)shortage of skills.”   The “high touch economy” for on-site labour in sectors such as construction, logistics, retail and hospitality are currently experiencing severe labour shortages. The disruption to international talent supply chains have caused significant bottlenecks to the supply of labour,  particularly effecting on-site, lower skilled jobs. On-going travel restrictions and pace vaccine rollout continue to impede immigration globally, but as an island nation we are now seeing the impact of this as demand recovers at pace.   The “low-touch economy”, on the other hand, where remote work is viable is experiencing greater churn due to the expansion of opportunity for skilled workers, shift in motivation, identity and desire for flexibility. This is now being experienced more acutely in Ireland as offices re-open and employees now vote with their feet, in choosing to resign over reengaging with employers in many cases. Demand has been particularly strong in IT, Financial Services and Life Sciences.    He adds: “If we thought the war for talent was tough, just wait for the battle of attrition. Retaining workers rather than attracting them is now emerging as the number one challenge for businesses across the globe.”