Connecting...

deloitte best managed company

Sigmar Named Deloitte Best Managed Company 2016

deloitte best managed company

On Friday March 4th, Sigmar Recruitment was named as one of Ireland’s ‘Best Managed’ companies in the 2016 Deloitte Best Managed Companies Awards Programme.

 

The awards event in Dublin’s Convention Centre marked the eighth year of the Deloitte Best Managed Companies awards programme, in association with Barclays Bank Ireland. The awards were attended by over 800 people from the Irish business community. Frank Ryan, chair of the independent judging panel, was keynote speaker on the night.

 

The Deloitte Best Managed Companies Awards Programme, in association with Barclays Bank Ireland, recognises indigenous Irish companies across Ireland which are operating at the highest levels of business performance. The network of 115 Best Managed Companies now employs over 47,000 people around the country and has a combined turnover of almost €10bn. Recognising the importance of overseas markets for Irish companies, the Best Managed Companies also recorded an average growth in export sales of 161% over the last three years.

 

Commenting on the award, Robert Mac Giolla Phádraig, CCO, Sigmar Recruitment said: ““We are delighted to be recognised as a Deloitte’s BMC which reflects the breadth and depth of leadership, innovation and capability across the entire organisation. Our people are truly world class and this award is a testament of their hard work, spirit and determination to always go further to deliver for clients and candidates. We are proud, and humbled, to lead on multiple fronts and from an industry perspective, to be the example.”

 

This award comes off the back of Sigmar’s ranking as #4 Best Place to Work in Ireland (Great Places to Work Institute), the highest ranking recruitment company in Ireland. Commenting on the award, Adrian McGennis, CEO adds: “At Sigmar, we really value this recognition as a Great Place to Work, particularly as the highest ranked recruitment company. The values we embrace and initiatives that we undertake are devised to fulfil our company objectives and include truly valuing all staff so it is great to receive external validation for affirmation. All the recent awards that have been presented to Sigmar reflect the commitment and talent of all the team and will be celebrated by all the team!”

Posted by Julia Purcell, Marketing & Communications Manager on 7 December 2017

Related Content

W1siziisijiwmjevmtavmtuvmtuvmjkvndyvmdq1nwzmnjetzwuwmc00ywyxlwe3n2etnwe1ndvmodcxmjzll3nodxr0zxjzdg9ja18zntg1mzgwntquanbnil0swyjwiiwidgh1bwiilci0mdb4mjywiyjdxq

Resignations Surge in September as Offices Re-open

Resignations Surge in September as Offices Re-open

Main Points Q3 record breaking recruitment placement results Highest in 20 years, peaking in September Up 44% for same period in 2020 Job orders in the first half of October are trending higher than any previous single month in company 20-year history The Talent Shortage Economy: Recruitment (for on-site labour and remote skills) is the single biggest threat to the Irish economy War for talent now being fought on two fronts: Battle for Retention internally and the Skills Struggle externally    “The Great Return is causing a Mass Exodus. The reopening of offices in September has prompted a new surge in resignations as Ireland now faces a Talent Crisis. Employers are increasingly requesting in-office presence and Employees are voting with their feet..” says Robert Mac Giolla Phádraig, founding director Sigmar Recruitment:   Sigmar Recruitment today reports a record high number of job placements for Q3 (July, August, September) 2021, up 44% on the same period 2020. The figures released today top previous results recorded in Q2, 2021, with September recording the best single month ever in the 20-year history of Sigmar. Job orders in the first two weeks in October are trending higher than any single full month in the company’s 20-year history.   The first half of the year saw strong, consistent growth with job placements, peaking initially in May. Summer months remained as strong, peaking once more in September. Robert Mac Giolla Phádraig, founding director of Sigmar believes that the request to return to the office in September has caused employees to revolt, as they do not wish to return to pre-pandemic conditions and practices..   Commenting on the tightening of the labour market, Mac Giolla Phádraig says: “Demand for talent has remained at an all-time high for the second quarter in our 20-year history. It was somewhat unusual not to see demand abate over the summer months. Indeed, demand continued to increase over the summer, resulting in September’s record results. The rate of job requests  in the first two weeks of October is unprecedented, indicating continued in Q4 and raises the question of the sustainability of talent supply.   “Remote working has literally opened up a world of new opportunity no longer bound by location which is creating significant churn in the professional skills market. This last 18 months has seen employees demand greater flexibility. The request to return to the office by employers in September has prompted employees to reconsider whether they recommit or resign. Many are resigning.”   Mac Giolla Phádraig likens remote work to long-distance relationships, which in many cases don’t work out. “We’ve gone from “living” with our employees in an office environment to long distance relationships, which often sees commitment recede over time. The context of location also opened up new experiences and possibilities on a scale never before seen. In September, many employers have asked employees to “trial” living together once more, which in some cases leads to a reunion or in others to separation.   "Another factor, on the employee side is that of identity and how what we do makes up part of who we are as individuals. “This last 18 months has asked big questions of us all, mainly how our working lives interact with our lives and how we identify with our working lives. In the absence of a workplace we’ve reassessed the balance between who we are and what we do, resulting in lesser commitment to our working selves and therefore to our employers. Employee loyalty has therefore become increasingly under question with many workers are now committed to the experience of work over the employer, adding further to the current levels of churn.”     Talent Shortage Economy Recruitment for both the on-site and remote talent remains the single largest threat to the Irish economy. Says Mac Giolla Phádraig: ”We are seeing two macro trends converge at once, compounding demand for talent across all sectors – (1) supply of labour and (2)shortage of skills.”   The “high touch economy” for on-site labour in sectors such as construction, logistics, retail and hospitality are currently experiencing severe labour shortages. The disruption to international talent supply chains have caused significant bottlenecks to the supply of labour,  particularly effecting on-site, lower skilled jobs. On-going travel restrictions and pace vaccine rollout continue to impede immigration globally, but as an island nation we are now seeing the impact of this as demand recovers at pace.   The “low-touch economy”, on the other hand, where remote work is viable is experiencing greater churn due to the expansion of opportunity for skilled workers, shift in motivation, identity and desire for flexibility. This is now being experienced more acutely in Ireland as offices re-open and employees now vote with their feet, in choosing to resign over reengaging with employers in many cases. Demand has been particularly strong in IT, Financial Services and Life Sciences.    He adds: “If we thought the war for talent was tough, just wait for the battle of attrition. Retaining workers rather than attracting them is now emerging as the number one challenge for businesses across the globe.”