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Grab employer attention online

How To Grab An Employer’s Attention Online

Grab employer attention online

With an ever increasing number of platforms to utilise for finding a job, how do you stand out from the crowd and grab an employer’s attention? We’ve put together nine easy steps to get yourself noticed online.

 

Create a LinkedIn Profile

LinkedIn is the most commonly used and abused job website in most countries at this stage. With over one million users in Ireland, LinkedIn has the capabilities of jobs boards along with a community of knowledge that any candidate can benefit from. Recruiters are probably some of the most avid LinkedIn users so make sure your profile is filled out in detail and is optimised with keywords associated with your target job.

 

Bonus Tip: Along with LinkedIn, recruiters and hiring managers also love Twitter to get jobs out there so consider becoming a regular user on this site also.

 

Use Jobs Boards Smartly

When applying for jobs tailor your CV for each position. Optimise your cover letter and skill section to match that of the job specification. Consider creating a profile on these sites but keep track of them as people tend to forget they create these profiles after they find a job.

 

Search Engine Optimisation (SEO)

This daunting term is not just relevant to marketers but to anyone who is marketing themselves online. SEO is identifying keywords relevant to your role and using these evenly throughout your profile. Look over specifications for jobs that you are interested in, identify commonly repeated skills that you possess and use these in your profiles.

 

This method works for any profile that is searchable online (both publically and privately) so apply these techniques to LinkedIn, jobs boards and anywhere else you are looking for a job.

 

Embed Social Profiles into CVs

Whether handing out hard copy CVs or sending CVs via email etc. make sure to include links to your online profiles. This gives recruiters and employers the opportunity to get to know you before an interview and will help recruiters gauge overall fit with the company. But be careful what you post on these sites as inappropriate posts can be detrimental to your future role.

 

Interact on Social Media

Most recruiters are active online, sharing content and updates. If they share a job that may not suit your experience but you know someone, forward or retweet to them. If your contact gets an interview they can drop your name in for the recruiter’s knowledge.

 

Sharing recruiter’s content and commenting on company news can be a great way of getting known by a company/recruiter. Following thought leaders in your industry will keep you ahead of the tide as regards changes in the trade and alert you to any importance conferences or networking events that you should be present at.

 

Be In Demand

Know what is going on in the landscape of your industry. Are things changing? Are there new technologies that will affect your job? Be ready to talk about these openly in your cover letter, on LinkedIn and in interviews. Showing that you are ahead of the curve with industry news shows that you are interested in your chosen profession/industry.

 

Keep a close eye on competitors to know what they are doing and come up with examples of how you can help your company gain traction over their competitors. Showing genuine vigour for a company can score you points with a recruiter.

 

Be Creative

The above point leads directly into this one – Be Creative. If you know your industry and the companies that you are applying for then you know the norms. Do not be afraid of pushing these norms to get noticed but know the limits of your industry. Do not copy off others but show your uniqueness through your CV and online profiles so that personality and cultural fit are evident.

 

Get Recommended

LinkedIn have a nifty tool called ‘Recommendations’ which allows colleagues/managers/former associates to publicly or privately provide feedback on your work ethic and experience working with you. This can be great when recruiters are trying to find talent as referrals can say a lot more about a person’s ability to work than their profile can.

 

Unique Selling Point Proposition

The most important thing to remember when actively seeking employment is that you are selling your skills and abilities to recruiters and human resource departments in the hope of a position in their company. With this in mind you need to figure out what skills/abilities you possess that makes you different to others in your field. For your online profile use something generic to the industry that you are in/want to be in but tailor your cover letter and CV for each role you are applying for – make it relevant to the position that you are aiming for.

 

Examples would be:

  • “I increased our company’s online sales by 11% in three months, using a mixture of social media, content creation and email marketing, which was coordinated solely by myself.”
  • “I effectively managed several large client accounts over the past year, turning them from loss making accounts into some of the largest profit making accounts for my company.”

Posted by Recruitment Consultant, Sigmar on 1 December 2017

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What Is LinkedIn?

What Is LinkedIn?

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Snapchat’s quick photo/story update features can now be found on Instagram, WhatsApp and Messenger command our 4G instant messaging services, and Facebook, well, Facebook does everything.   However, there is one of few platforms that’s focus has managed to remain consistent since its creation, and that platform is LinkedIn. LinkedIn is the world's largest online professional network. You can use LinkedIn to find the right job or internship, connect and strengthen professional relationships, and learn the skills you need to succeed in your career.   In essence, LinkedIn is the main social media hub for employers and businesses. For some, checking LinkedIn every day is like checking the newspaper, except unlike other social media platforms LinkedIn is optimised, professional, well presented, practical, focused and ultimately good. Now I have not been monetarily compensated by LinkedIn to write anything on the behalf, however I do believe that the importance of LinkedIn cannot be stressd enough, especially if you are looking to progress into the upper echalons of the corperate world. To those who have yet to utilise this platform, or simply want an overview of what it is and how it works, read on     Who Should Use LinkedIn? Given that the main focus of the site is to connect businesses, establish relationships and help companies advertise jobs, your average LinkedIn user will fall into the category of ‘business professional.’ It is a platform for people looking to advance their career’s, including people from various professional backgrounds, small business owners, students, and job seekers. LinkedIn members can use the platform to tap into a network of professionals, companies, and groups within and beyond their industry. Though LinkedIn’s homepage features a feed where users can post updates and developments in their personal lives as well as photos and videos, the content still centres around the professional working life, so you may have to look elsewhere to get your cute animal fix.     Why You Should Join LinkedIn LinkedIn is the key that will open the door to the interconnected landscape of business. Your profile will display your various accolades, previous work experiences, qualifications and personal bio, along with any personal hobbies and interested you wish to share. Now you might be thinking this sounds a lot like the criteria one would find on a CV, and that is not an unfair comparison to make. Many jobseekers use LinkedIn as their primary tool of self-marketing to send to companies who have advertised jobs, and employers can use it to search for candidates and present them with opportunities to work. Thus, a fleshed out, optimised and slick LinkedIn profile can prove to be an invaluable tool as you progress through your professional life.       Where Do I Start Like many social medias, the best way to learn more about the features of the site is to simply jump in with a freshly created profile and click your way around the sites menu’s. However, we have a few suggestions to get you started:   1. Create a Profile Though this may seem obvious, LinkedIn does allow you to explore most of what the site has to offer without the need of creating a profile. However, having your own profile with allow the algorithm to tailor your experience on the site to your own personal preferences. Jobs advertised will become more closely linked to your current profession, and industry related content will appear more frequently on your feed. Naturally of course If you already have a reason in mind for signing up to LinkedIn, then one assumes your profile is ready to go Do take time when creating your profile. As previously mentioned, LinkedIn can function as an online CV, so take this into account when uploading a profile photo and writing your bio. Include all relevant experiences and skills you have within your profession in indoor to add further employability to your page   2. Build your connections The network you create will play a crucial part in unlocking the power of LinkedIn as it will help you understand what is happening in your industry and professional circle. You can begin by adding your family, friends, past or current classmates, and co-workers to your network. You can also follow people, companies, or topics by navigating directly to the Follow fresh perspectives page, which displays recommended sources to follow.   3. Browse the Catalogue of Jobs The job search is one of the standout features of LinkedIn. You can use the job search to research companies in preparation for an interview, reach out to hiring communities or simply see what current roles are being advertised for. LinkedIn is one of the top platforms when it comes to advertising vacancies, so there’s a high chance a specific role or a role in a less well known or advertised industry will appear in your searches. You can also save jobs searches or notify your connections and recruiters that you’re open to job opportunities.   4. Engage in Conversation Though LinkedIn as a platform caters more to a tool for business than traditional social media, you can still connect and talk to people as you would on any other platform. Feel free to engage in updates and posts from the companies or individuals you follow. This can even work as a catalyst to establish further connections with new likeminded individuals.   5. Post Content And finally, post stuff! Don’t be afraid of uploading content onto your page. Keep your connections updated with any recent developments in your professional career, reach out to industry experts for advice, stimulate debate and even alert people to vacancies in your place of work.   In Conclusion LinkedIn is an invaluable tool used by many as a catalyst to progress further in their working life. The benefits of LinkedIn should never be understated, and once you’ve begun to explore the site and engage with content, you’ll wonder how you ever navigated the job market without it