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attract candidates with social media

How To Attract Candidates Using Social Media

attract candidates with social media

Social media plays a big part in our lives today. We use it to connect with friends, receive news updates and to interact with people and groups who share our interests and passions. It’s no surprise that more and more job seekers are using social media in their hunt for suitable positions. Why then should employers be any different?

 

The most important thing is that candidates want to interact with people, not a faceless brand or company. It’s vital that you build rapport with your connections. This can be done by providing links to quality content, interacting with them and answering any queries they have about the company or specific roles within it. It also enables anyone interested in working with you to learn about what you do and your ethos and culture as a company.

 

While you do need to adjust your approach to attracting candidates according to which social media platform you’re using, there are some common elements that can be utilised across all channels.This post focuses on the three social media platforms that are mainly used for recruitment; LinkedIn, Facebook and Twitter.

 

LinkedIn

LinkedIn is the number one social media tool utilised by employers and jobseekers alike as it is a platform that connects professionals to each other and to businesses.

 

Ensure that your company’s profile is attractive and optimised with key words so people can find you easily. Any vacancy listed on your profile should include links to further information such as the job spec, skills required, company description and how to apply. While it is obviously important to have your company page optimised, it’s also a really good idea to encourage current employees to bring their own profiles up to date. If people are interested in joining a company they often like to hear what people currently working there have to say about it.

 

 

Facebook

Facebook is the most personal of the social media platforms allowing you to showcase the ‘human side’ of your organisation. Photos and videos of staff outings and events can help to portray your company as a positive, fun environment in which to work.

Again you should include a link providing further relevant information. Something as simple as including a ‘job listings’ tab on your company’s page can lead to a significantly increased candidate pool.

You can target potential candidates with Facebook ads. The ad feature on Facebook allows you to aim ads at a very specific audience through the use of filters such as education and work experience.

 

 

Twitter

Twitter may not be the first place you’d think of when looking to attract candidates, but there’s no doubt it can serve as a very useful recruitment tool. With its 140 character limit, it’s all about making an instant impact. Be aware of topical issues and areas of interest for suitable candidates. Create tweets around these areas and use the appropriate hashtags to attract the right people. Include links in your tweets to relevant content on your blog and website.

 

Follow the right people and chances are they will follow you back. Comment on their tweets and always reply if they contact you. This helps to cement the relationship.

 

A really great function of Twitter is that it allows you to group people together in different lists. Generate twitter lists of individuals that may be suitable for different roles. You can then focus on targeting them with tweets tailored to their interests.


Social media has the ability to foster relationships with people who could be great employees for you. If you put the effort into developing your platforms, the rewards can be great.

Posted by Recruitment Consultant, Sigmar on 7 December 2017

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Resignations Surge in September as Offices Re-open

Resignations Surge in September as Offices Re-open

Main Points Q3 record breaking recruitment placement results Highest in 20 years, peaking in September Up 44% for same period in 2020 Job orders in the first half of October are trending higher than any previous single month in company 20-year history The Talent Shortage Economy: Recruitment (for on-site labour and remote skills) is the single biggest threat to the Irish economy War for talent now being fought on two fronts: Battle for Retention internally and the Skills Struggle externally    “The Great Return is causing a Mass Exodus. The reopening of offices in September has prompted a new surge in resignations as Ireland now faces a Talent Crisis. Employers are increasingly requesting in-office presence and Employees are voting with their feet..” says Robert Mac Giolla Phádraig, founding director Sigmar Recruitment:   Sigmar Recruitment today reports a record high number of job placements for Q3 (July, August, September) 2021, up 44% on the same period 2020. The figures released today top previous results recorded in Q2, 2021, with September recording the best single month ever in the 20-year history of Sigmar. Job orders in the first two weeks in October are trending higher than any single full month in the company’s 20-year history.   The first half of the year saw strong, consistent growth with job placements, peaking initially in May. Summer months remained as strong, peaking once more in September. Robert Mac Giolla Phádraig, founding director of Sigmar believes that the request to return to the office in September has caused employees to revolt, as they do not wish to return to pre-pandemic conditions and practices..   Commenting on the tightening of the labour market, Mac Giolla Phádraig says: “Demand for talent has remained at an all-time high for the second quarter in our 20-year history. It was somewhat unusual not to see demand abate over the summer months. Indeed, demand continued to increase over the summer, resulting in September’s record results. The rate of job requests  in the first two weeks of October is unprecedented, indicating continued in Q4 and raises the question of the sustainability of talent supply.   “Remote working has literally opened up a world of new opportunity no longer bound by location which is creating significant churn in the professional skills market. This last 18 months has seen employees demand greater flexibility. The request to return to the office by employers in September has prompted employees to reconsider whether they recommit or resign. Many are resigning.”   Mac Giolla Phádraig likens remote work to long-distance relationships, which in many cases don’t work out. “We’ve gone from “living” with our employees in an office environment to long distance relationships, which often sees commitment recede over time. The context of location also opened up new experiences and possibilities on a scale never before seen. In September, many employers have asked employees to “trial” living together once more, which in some cases leads to a reunion or in others to separation.   "Another factor, on the employee side is that of identity and how what we do makes up part of who we are as individuals. “This last 18 months has asked big questions of us all, mainly how our working lives interact with our lives and how we identify with our working lives. In the absence of a workplace we’ve reassessed the balance between who we are and what we do, resulting in lesser commitment to our working selves and therefore to our employers. Employee loyalty has therefore become increasingly under question with many workers are now committed to the experience of work over the employer, adding further to the current levels of churn.”     Talent Shortage Economy Recruitment for both the on-site and remote talent remains the single largest threat to the Irish economy. Says Mac Giolla Phádraig: ”We are seeing two macro trends converge at once, compounding demand for talent across all sectors – (1) supply of labour and (2)shortage of skills.”   The “high touch economy” for on-site labour in sectors such as construction, logistics, retail and hospitality are currently experiencing severe labour shortages. The disruption to international talent supply chains have caused significant bottlenecks to the supply of labour,  particularly effecting on-site, lower skilled jobs. On-going travel restrictions and pace vaccine rollout continue to impede immigration globally, but as an island nation we are now seeing the impact of this as demand recovers at pace.   The “low-touch economy”, on the other hand, where remote work is viable is experiencing greater churn due to the expansion of opportunity for skilled workers, shift in motivation, identity and desire for flexibility. This is now being experienced more acutely in Ireland as offices re-open and employees now vote with their feet, in choosing to resign over reengaging with employers in many cases. Demand has been particularly strong in IT, Financial Services and Life Sciences.    He adds: “If we thought the war for talent was tough, just wait for the battle of attrition. Retaining workers rather than attracting them is now emerging as the number one challenge for businesses across the globe.”