Connecting...

Digital Marketing jobs

How Do I Get A Job In Digital Marketing?

Digital Marketing jobs

One of the most common questions we get asked by recent graduates or people looking to alter their career is about working in Digital Marketing. It is the Holy Grail for a lot of people coming out of a business/marketing qualification and is one of the mostly highly competitive spaces to go into when searching for work. It is difficult to get these positions but not impossible.

 

First of all why do you want to work as a Digital Marketer? Are you techie, a nerd or a geek? To be successful in this space you need to be passionate about the tools you are using to reach the people you are trying to target. This is a space that moves so fast that knowledge gained can be redundant within 6 months and if you don’t have the desire to keep pace you will get left behind. Keep embracing new technologies, be an early adopter and don’t fall by the wayside.

 

Now that we know you really want this career let’s see how you can gain an edge against your competition:

 

1. Get a qualification

You are going to need a qualification in marketing with a strong focus on digital in it. If it’s not in the title then mention the digital courses in your education. Any additional courses you can do for free in your spare time should be mentioned – Companies want you to be good with software packages like Hubspot – download it and play around!

 

2. Build an online presence! 

You are applying for a digital role so you need to have a digital presence – Linkedin, Facebook, Twitter – all should be up to date and active (especially Linkedin as this is the first place a recruiter or hiring manager will look). Blogs, digital portfolios or anything that shows contribution or activity online can be an effective tool. You want to stand out so blog about something you are passionate about!

 

3. Specialise in something. 

Social Media, Digital Content and e-Marketing are probably the 3 biggest areas within Digital Marketing and if you can show that this niche is your gig then you will fare better in applying to those roles.

 

4. Work experience 

This is the tricky bit. Most employers want to see some experience on your CV so where possible do internships and ask for work while there. Also look at volunteering to improve the online presence of local clubs or businesses – do they have a Facebook page and can you increase the amount of likes they get?

 

5. Mention all of this on your CV! 

As a recruiter I don’t have time to read a cover letter from every applicant so if the info isn’t on your CV then I won’t see it. Be clear and concise but make sure I see – education, digital experience, and digital skills.

 

The key thing about getting work in digital is to realise that the person you apply to will immediately check out your online presence and level of activity. If I am looking for someone to publish content online and you can show that you do that on a regular basis you should be a step or two ahead of some of your rivals. None of the above will guarantee you a job in digital marketing, but it will certainly set you on the right path!

Posted by Jamie Harnett on 4 December 2017

Sign up for HR & Recruitment Insights Weekely Email

Get a weekly email filled with content about GDPR, Recruitment, Hiring, Employer Branding and Company Culture direct to your inbox.

Sign up for our Jobseeking Tips & Advice Weekly Email

Get jobhunting tips, productivity hacks and career planning advice direct to your inbox.

Related Content

W1siziisijiwmtgvmdgvmjevmdkvmjcvmdgvmzc5l0jhzcbcb3nzltewmc5qcgcixsxbinailcj0ahvtyiisijqwmhgynjajil1d

What To Do If You’re Dealing With A Toxic Boss

What To Do If You’re Dealing With A Toxic Boss

In last week’s blog we looked at How to Recognise a Toxic Boss. We know the perfect boss doesn’t exist, just like the perfect employee doesn’t, so you shouldn’t be too hard on your boss. However, once you are sure your manager is toxic, it’s important to know what to do Try Not Take It Personally Whatever is going on with your boss, it has nothing to do with you. If this is their managing style they more than likely have treated people like this before and will probably continue to treat people like this in future. Try to remind yourself of this as often as you can so your self-confidence doesn’t become affected by your toxic boss. Know That You Don’t Need Them To Succeed Your boss may make you feel like they are the reason you have a job and you would be useless to another company, they’re wrong! You are more than capable of being successful in your career and that has nothing to do with your boss. Karma This is always a sweet little reminder when your boss is treating you badly. Things come back around on people and the same goes for you. You’re having a hard time now, but things will improve for you and as for your boss, they will probably get what is coming to them sooner or later. Write Down How You Feel This is a great way to get things off your chest. Write it all down. Everything! It can even be as inappropriate as you like, ‘cause your boss will never see it. That’s the beauty of it! Say everything you need to and destroy the evidence. I can guarantee you’ll feel a lot better after it. Keep Records Try to document as much as you can. If your boss is treating you unfairly, it’s best to have documents to prove it. Even if your interaction with them is mostly face to face, ask them to follow up in an email. A lot of the misbehaviour of a toxic boss is going back on their word. For instance, they tell you to do something but then deny it or grant you permission to do something, like take annual leave and then they deny ever being asked. The best thing to do is always follow up on verbal conversations with an email and to keep a diary. Write everything your boss asks you to do in a diary and if they ever accuse you of not doing something you can check back in your diary afterwards. Arrange A Meeting With Your Boss Sometimes just sitting down with your boss and explaining that you feel they are unhappy with you can really make a difference. Having a face to face conversation about the issues you have could solve things. It might not be the case but it’s the first step before approaching HR. Speak to HR If you have approached your boss or have at least tried to but felt it was unsuccessful, the next step is to speak to HR. After you have prepared your records and can explain your bosses misconduct clearly and accurately you should have a strong case for your HR department. Know When to Leave Sometimes the only thing you can do to fix the situation is to find a new job. Life is too short to sit in a job with a boss who makes you miserable. If HR couldn’t solve the issue and you couldn’t move departments, you may wish to start applying for new jobs.

W1siziisijiwmtgvmdgvmtqvmtuvndevntgvnti0l0fydgjvyxjkidegbmv3ig5ldy0xmdauanbnil0swyjwiiwidgh1bwiilci0mdb4mjywiyjdxq

Future Jobs for Irish Youths

Future Jobs for Irish Youths

With the Leaving Cert results being released today, we felt it necessary to take a look at where the future of jobs will be for Irish youths. Broadly the global economic performance and Ireland’s position are positive for the foreseeable future. With unemployment now at 5.1% and decreasing quarterly, all signals point towards continued, sustainable improvement. Below is a list of the sectors that hold the best chances for economic and job growth in the near future. ICT Sector If there’s one thing that is evolving at break-neck speed, it’s technology. And with new developments and improvements every day, it can safely be said that the field of technology, whether machinery or software, is only going to grow by leaps and bounds. The ICT sector has been of tremendous importance to our economy, with 37,000 people employed and generating €35 billion in exports annually. 8 of the top 10 ICT companies in the world are based here. Ireland has proven itself to be one of the world’s best locations for ICT. However, to maintain this reputation Ireland needs to continuously produce highly skilled IT professionals. However there are already significant skills shortages in a variety of areas such as IT project management and of ICT professionals with foreign language skills. ICT will continue to be one of the most important sectors of our economy for the future, as technology continuously advances, making it as close to a safe bet as you can get these days. Pharmaceutical and Biotechnology Industry “Ireland is now operating in the same ballpark as major science-funding countries around the world ” - Professor Mark Ferguson – SFI Director Already one of Ireland’s best performing industries, the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industry looks set to grow further. With a growing and ageing population worldwide, the number and degree of health related issues is continuously on the rise. People will always need medical care ensuring a continued demand for research, development and production of new drugs. There are now over 60,000 people employed in the industry, either directly or indirectly. This trend looks set to continue into 2018 with major expansions of many of the big pharma players across the country. The IDA reports the biopharmaceutical industry has made a capital investment of approximately €8 billion in new facilities in Ireland, predominantly in the last 10 years. This represents one of the largest investments in new biotech facilities anywhere in the world. As a result of the growth in pharmaceuticals, biotechnology and medical device industries in Ireland, it is very likely that a student about to graduate with a third level qualification in science will find interesting employment in one of the following areas; research, manufacturing, regulation or sales and marketing. Financial Sector The financial services jobs market for accountancy professionals continued its upwards growth trend last year. Even without the added benefit of companies relocating to Ireland post BREXIT, the confidence of both employer and employee alike has produced a healthy landscape with more opportunity for those who wish to change jobs. There is no doubt BREXIT has been a major contributor to the growth in the financial services jobs market. We have seen major international companies relocate operations to Dublin and others who already have a presence here have laid out plans to significantly increase their headcount. This is all positive news for graduates who studied in this area. Not only does this create opportunities that would not have existed without BREXIT, it also increases churn in the market involving more established financial services companies in Ireland who subsequently end up with more vacancies themselves. Particularly for accountants, regulatory reporting accountants and in Funds if you specialised in fund accounting, risk & control, depository, compliance and AML you will find interesting and worthwhile employment when you graduate

W1siziisijiwmtcvmtivmduvmtgvmjmvndcvmjgwl2xlyxzpbibjzxj0ihjlc3vsdhmgbm90igdvb2quanblzyjdlfsiccisinrodw1iiiwindawedi2mcmixv0

What To Do If Your Leaving Cert Results Are Not What You Expected

What To Do If Your Leaving Cert Results Are Not What You Expected

Over 55,000 students sit their leaving certificate each year. Whilst many are happy with their results, a lot end up not so thrilled. If you did your leaving cert this year and you didn't do as well as you planned, it’s not the end of the world. Step back and take our advice below and you’ll be back on track before you know it. 1. Don’t Panic! It’s easier said than done when you’re overwhelmed with disappointment but give yourself time to come to terms with your results before you look at the long-term implications. Remember, you are not the first student to be disappointed with your exam results. Remember, some of the world most successful business men didn’t do well in their leaving i.e. Billl Cullen, Richard Branson. 2. Self Assess Take the time to consider what you want to do, where your interests lie and what your strengths and weaknesses are. You had your heart set on a certain course, but was it really for you? Figure this out before you make any decisions. via GIPHY 3. Research Possible Career Routes Think carefully about the career you would like to pursue and research thoroughly all of the possible routes to get there. Just because you think you’ve missed out on your ideal course, doesn’t mean there’s not another route to your end goal. If you don’t know what you want to do, look for a general course which will give you plenty of options. via GIPHY via GIPHY 4. Consider Repeating It’s big step but if you’re sure of the course you want and didn’t get the points, consider repeating. But remember to ask yourself will repeating actually help you get to where you want to be? Do not repeat for a lack of other options. via GIPHY 5. Gain Work Experience (Get a job) This is an excellent opportunity for you to develop skills and competencies, which would be attractive to employers. It also give you the opportunity to experience different industries and to see if you are happier in a working environment rather than the academic. via GIPHY via GIPHY 6. Don’t Let Friends Influence You Whilst it’s great discussing your option with friends/family/teacher/career advisors, only you know what to do. Make your decision on self assessment. via GIPHY via GIPHY 7. Take Time To Relax Do still find the time to relax, unwind and enjoy your hobbies despite the pressure you are under. Try listening to music, going to see a film or reading a book to escape for a while. A clear head can help you think more objectively. via GIPHY

W1siziisijiwmtgvmdgvmdcvmtavmtgvmjkvmjmvtg92zsbqb2igagf0zsbib3nzideuanblzyjdlfsiccisinrodw1iiiwindawedi2mcmixv0

How to Recognise a Toxic Boss

How to Recognise a Toxic Boss

The perfect boss doesn’t exist, just like the perfect employee doesn’t exist. Always bear in mind that everyone has their flaws. However, with good working relationships being so important for work satisfaction, if you’re unsure about your relationship with your boss here is how to recognise the signs of a toxic boss. Unprofessional Behaviour This one is a no brainer. If your boss acts completely unprofessional with you then they are classed as a toxic boss. Unprofessional behaviour falls under serious misconduct such as, sexual harassment, bullying, using curse words and other less serious behaviours like being unable to make eye contact and interrupting and allowing others to interrupt them. If your boss behaves in this way you will need to contact your HR department immediately. It’s completely unacceptable behaviour and you will need to address it sooner rather than later. Doesn’t Listen Anyone that doesn’t listen in the work place is going to be very difficult to work with, but if it’s your boss, this will be bring so many issues to your working life. As an employee it is important for you to be heard by your superiors so that you feel valued and are appreciated. Not being heard will demotivate you but it will also make it very hard for you to confide in your boss as well. via GIPHY Unrealistic Expectations Good managers will always want to push you beyond your comfort zone to encourage you to succeed, but a toxic manager will just push you to the point of work overload and make you feel stressed rather than motivated. If your boss has you working to unrealistic deadlines or expects you to abandon your workload for what they feel is priority to them, this will create a very toxic environment for you. Ungrateful At the end of the day, you are paid to do a job and every time you do that job you can’t expect praise. However, a boss that can never say “Thank you” or “Good job” that’s a clear indication of a toxic manager. It’s okay if your boss expects you to do things for him/her without a big song and dance thanking you for it, but the odd time it’s important to have communication of the fact they are grateful for your help. Micromanaging This is one of the most toxic work environments any professional can be expected to work in. Having a boss look over their shoulder at you and being made to feel like you are being constantly watched is very stressful and it’s the perfect way to destroy productivity. Being a Fun Boss It’s nice to be able to get along with your boss but if you feel your boss is more of a friend than a manager, you may have a problem. It’s important for leaders to be admired and respected as superiors but a manger who is more interested in being your pal will never be someone you look up to. It also makes any kind of constructive criticism from them very hard to take. Often if a manger is too friendly when it actually comes to managing you and giving you criticism, you will either not take their comments seriously and brush it off or find yourself offended and hurt by their comments because you thought they were your friend. Blurred lines between boss and friend is an indication of toxicity. via GIPHY Takes Credit but Never Responsibility A manger is there to lead and celebrate your successes, not make you do the work for their benefit. A manager who can take credit for your work but blames you for their mistakes is undoubtedly a toxic boss. A boss should never use your successes as their own and should always be held responsible for their own mistakes. Never Being Wrong This type of boss reminds me of the Roald Dahl character in Matilda, Miss Trunchbull. This quote in particular… “I'm right and you're wrong, I'm big and you're small, and there's nothing you can do about it.” ― Roald Dahl, Matilda. It can be hard to work for and communicate with a boss who feels they’re right all the time and doesn’t accept your views. It can be a very toxic environment for someone working with a boss like this. If your boss is anything like Miss Trunchbull, you really need to accept your boss could be toxic. via GIPHY If your boss does any of these things and it makes you feel uncomfortable and uneasy in work, you should approach your HR Department with your concerns. If you feel you’ve done all you can to resolve the issue and nothing has come of it, it may be time to search for a new job. Send your CV to us in Sigmar Recruitment and we can help find you a more suitable position.