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gateway to europe

Cara Magazine Feature: Ireland Gateway To Europe

gateway to europe

6am My 10-month-old alarm clock, ie beautiful third daughter, wakes me every morning without fail. This is soon followed by two more little bedheaded beauties tiptoeing into my bedroom for a cuddle before I “swan off” to work, as my wife calls it (I have to admit that it does often feel like this as I love what I do). I catch the news  on Morning Ireland as I drive to work and flick through The Irish Times business pages as I pick up my habitual morning coffee and porridge in Munchies on Baggot Street.

 

8am I like to arrive early and typically spend the first hour dealing with overnight developments and activating meetings for the days ahead. As chief commercial officer at Sigmar Recruitment, I work with an amazing team of 120 who have a shared commitment to succeed, which creates a truly unique culture built on autonomy, where we all act and behave like founders.

 

9am I immerse myself in the action, tendering for new business, designing talent solutions for clients and interviewing for staff – we recently announced the creation of 150 jobs. I’m also currently busy designing a compact MBA programme for our leadership team with Trinity Business School and University of Notre Dame.

 

10.30am This is my meeting time – clients, collaborators and stakeholders. I like to go to Residence as it’s close by and private. I’m also founder of the Talent Summit, Ireland’s largest
HR and leadership conference, that promotes better workplaces and better working lives. This, for me, is the North Star in terms of purpose and puts us at the centre of the rapidly changing world of work. I’m also plotting a Talent Talks live event in the National Gallery for October.

 

1pm I hit the gym at least three days a week and use this time to listen to podcasts and research speakers for upcoming events. The afternoon is usually bustling as corporate America awakens so I often dine “al desko”. We are also co-founders of “Ireland, Gateway to Europe” (gatewaytoeurope.com) a trade mission we have been bringing to the US for the past six years and this year we are bringing a delegation of 50 business leaders on a three-day mission to Palo Alto and San Francisco on September 26-27. As a result, my afternoons are currently jam-packed with calls as the sun moves from East to West.

 

6pm If entertaining clients, I like to go to Suesey Street, Fitzwilliam Place, but most days I try to leave the office by 6.15pm. As much as I enjoy what I do, there is nothing like the excitement I feel when I reach Bushy Park, knowing that just around the corner I’m about to see my family.

 

8pm Grab a bite to eat and maybe jump on a couple of calls with clients on the West Coast. Read a couple of pages before bed – currently enjoying Shifting Gears by Ryan O’Reilly, a super take on resilience and motivation. Weekends With my girls – goblin hunting in the forest is the latest. Might do Foam in Terenure for breakfast and, if we’re lucky, the odd date night: TapHouse in Ranelagh if going casual, or Shanahan’s on the Green if going all out.

Robert MacGiolla Phadraig

 

 

 

 

I LOVE VISITING …

 

SAN FRANCISCO There is no other city as vibrant or as innovative from a business perspective. The energy is infectious and I always leave San Fran a little drained but full of hope and aspiration for my ventures back in Ireland.Our trade mission this month is our third time bringing IGTE back to the Bay Area and we are very excited to return.

 

BOSTON I’m on the advisory board of the Boston College, Ireland Business Council, which brings me to Boston frequently. I love staying at the Liberty Hotel – a former jail overlooking Charles River, with a great running track over to Cambridge and back. It’s also close to 75 Chestnut – one of the best neighbourhood restaurants in Boston – and a short train ride to the JFK Library and Museum.

 

NICE We’ve been lucky enough to bring our Sigmar team away on our Christmas party each year and hit Nice twice in recent times. A great base to explore all the French Riviera has to offer, from lunch outside Café de Paris in Monaco, watching how the other half live, to visiting stunning, hilltop, Medieval towns such as St Paul de Vence or Éze.

 

Sigmar Recruitment CCO Robert Mac Giolla Phádraig is the driving force behind the Ireland Gateway to Europe trade mission that travels to California this month to boost transatlantic trade.

 

 

 

 

Posted by As seen in Cara magazine on 7 December 2017

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Resignations Surge in September as Offices Re-open

Resignations Surge in September as Offices Re-open

Main Points Q3 record breaking recruitment placement results Highest in 20 years, peaking in September Up 44% for same period in 2020 Job orders in the first half of October are trending higher than any previous single month in company 20-year history The Talent Shortage Economy: Recruitment (for on-site labour and remote skills) is the single biggest threat to the Irish economy War for talent now being fought on two fronts: Battle for Retention internally and the Skills Struggle externally    “The Great Return is causing a Mass Exodus. The reopening of offices in September has prompted a new surge in resignations as Ireland now faces a Talent Crisis. Employers are increasingly requesting in-office presence and Employees are voting with their feet..” says Robert Mac Giolla Phádraig, founding director Sigmar Recruitment:   Sigmar Recruitment today reports a record high number of job placements for Q3 (July, August, September) 2021, up 44% on the same period 2020. The figures released today top previous results recorded in Q2, 2021, with September recording the best single month ever in the 20-year history of Sigmar. Job orders in the first two weeks in October are trending higher than any single full month in the company’s 20-year history.   The first half of the year saw strong, consistent growth with job placements, peaking initially in May. Summer months remained as strong, peaking once more in September. Robert Mac Giolla Phádraig, founding director of Sigmar believes that the request to return to the office in September has caused employees to revolt, as they do not wish to return to pre-pandemic conditions and practices..   Commenting on the tightening of the labour market, Mac Giolla Phádraig says: “Demand for talent has remained at an all-time high for the second quarter in our 20-year history. It was somewhat unusual not to see demand abate over the summer months. Indeed, demand continued to increase over the summer, resulting in September’s record results. The rate of job requests  in the first two weeks of October is unprecedented, indicating continued in Q4 and raises the question of the sustainability of talent supply.   “Remote working has literally opened up a world of new opportunity no longer bound by location which is creating significant churn in the professional skills market. This last 18 months has seen employees demand greater flexibility. The request to return to the office by employers in September has prompted employees to reconsider whether they recommit or resign. Many are resigning.”   Mac Giolla Phádraig likens remote work to long-distance relationships, which in many cases don’t work out. “We’ve gone from “living” with our employees in an office environment to long distance relationships, which often sees commitment recede over time. The context of location also opened up new experiences and possibilities on a scale never before seen. In September, many employers have asked employees to “trial” living together once more, which in some cases leads to a reunion or in others to separation.   "Another factor, on the employee side is that of identity and how what we do makes up part of who we are as individuals. “This last 18 months has asked big questions of us all, mainly how our working lives interact with our lives and how we identify with our working lives. In the absence of a workplace we’ve reassessed the balance between who we are and what we do, resulting in lesser commitment to our working selves and therefore to our employers. Employee loyalty has therefore become increasingly under question with many workers are now committed to the experience of work over the employer, adding further to the current levels of churn.”     Talent Shortage Economy Recruitment for both the on-site and remote talent remains the single largest threat to the Irish economy. Says Mac Giolla Phádraig: ”We are seeing two macro trends converge at once, compounding demand for talent across all sectors – (1) supply of labour and (2)shortage of skills.”   The “high touch economy” for on-site labour in sectors such as construction, logistics, retail and hospitality are currently experiencing severe labour shortages. The disruption to international talent supply chains have caused significant bottlenecks to the supply of labour,  particularly effecting on-site, lower skilled jobs. On-going travel restrictions and pace vaccine rollout continue to impede immigration globally, but as an island nation we are now seeing the impact of this as demand recovers at pace.   The “low-touch economy”, on the other hand, where remote work is viable is experiencing greater churn due to the expansion of opportunity for skilled workers, shift in motivation, identity and desire for flexibility. This is now being experienced more acutely in Ireland as offices re-open and employees now vote with their feet, in choosing to resign over reengaging with employers in many cases. Demand has been particularly strong in IT, Financial Services and Life Sciences.    He adds: “If we thought the war for talent was tough, just wait for the battle of attrition. Retaining workers rather than attracting them is now emerging as the number one challenge for businesses across the globe.”