Connecting...

market yourself

Make yourself more marketable

market yourself

No doubt about it, the job market is a tough place to be right now. While that is enough to get you down, don’t let it derail your goals of landing a great job or getting yourself a promotion. No matter what you do for a living, chances are that with a small amount of effort, you can take the education, skills and work experience you already have and make yourself even more marketable. It’s time to make yourself stand out from the crowd and make your boss or potential future employers take notice of you!

 

Continuous upgrade of knowledge and skills

Learning does not stop after you finish school/college. If you view learning as a life-long process, you will in the long run be more marketable than those who do not. Strive to find ways to upgrade yourself. Seize opportunities to learn new skills.

Classes and courses can be especially helpful if it teaches you a skill that you don’t already have. But learning can be as simple as taking on a new project at work, or reading an article about a new development in your industry.

 

Become technologically savvy

The rapid advancements in IT affect almost every profession, some more so than others. Whether you’re planning a career in health care, law, engineering, sales, marketing, HR or financial services, it is essential that you understand how technology influences your line of work. Technologically savvy employees can more easily comprehend how advances in technology enable them to perform their job duties more efficiently.

To accomplish this, make sure you have fundamental knowledge of computer operations, e-commerce, and software applications that relate to your field. Even one or two computer and internet-related classes can significantly add to your knowledge base.

 

Develop skills that are transferable

Transferable skills are not specific to a single role. These can be adapted to use in any job such as communications skills, leadership and management skills, planning and research skills, teamwork and interpersonal skills and self-management skills.

The best way to gain transferable skills is through experience so put yourself into situations where you can build on these skills. By doing something as simple as volunteering to be chairperson of your local sports club for example, you will be improving your leadership and communication skills as you take charge and chair committee meetings.

 

Promote yourself through social networking sites

Us Irish have never been the best for blowing our own trumpet but social networks are a great opportunity to do just so and get yourself noticed. As we’ve mentioned before social networks are being used more and more frequently by recruiters and HR managers alike so just make sure you’ve cleaned up all your online profiles. Also try to widen your network of contacts which will give you a greater chance to be noticed by potential employers.

 

Volunteer for assignments

Be bold! Seek out special projects at work even if it falls outside the boundaries of your job description. New projects can be a great learning opportunity (that you can add to your CV) and it will really impress your boss that you’ve taken the initiative to get involved in the project. The work and time invested in the assignment will pay off later, whether in the form of a performance-based bonus, a glowing recommendation, or a new position.

 

Stand out during interviews

Do not take job interviews lightly, whatever your years of experience might be. In fact, the higher the position, the higher the expectations. Be prepared to be asked about ideas and improvements you can bring to the table. Most of the time, candidates that succeed are the ones that impress the interviewers with ideas that can be executed right away as though they are already part of the organization. Any time you apply for a job, make sure you can tell a story about your career that shows why you would be the best person for the job.

Posted by Julia Purcell, Marketing & Communications Manager Sigmar on 29 November 2017

Related Content

W1siziisijiwmjavmtavmdgvmtavndcvmduvnjgvq29wesbvziburu1qifx1mdaynibdt05uukfdve9sifjfq1jvsvrnru5uicbjbmzvz3jhcghpyy5wbmcixsxbinailcj0ahvtyiisijqwmhgynjajil1d

“K-shaped” Workforce Patterns Begin to Emerge with Major Spike in Flexi-labour

“K-shaped” Workforce Patterns Begin to Emerge with Major Spike in Flexi-labour

The latest data from Sigmar Recruitment’s Employer Sentiment Report suggests that most companies plan on hiring more contingent labour in order to deal with the extended market turbulence. Having surveyed 1000 Irish based companies, 91% of respondents said they are more likely to hire temps or contractors than before COVID-19. Commenting on the results, Barry Rudden, Director, Sigmar Recruitment says; “This may signify a fundamental shift in how workforces will be constituted moving forward as employers are wary of future market shocks. Whilst demand has rebounded since March, companies just don’t know how the market will react to a possible second wave of infections, topped with Brexit fears, so there are still challenges ahead for organisations and as a result they are hesitant to commit to permanent hires.” One third of all companies surveyed said it was likely or highly likely that they would increase the % of temp/contract staff they already engage. “This is the norm in early stages of an extended recovery. Seeing this trend emerge at polar ends of the labour market is indicative of a new K-Shaped labour market.” says Rudden. He adds; “When viewed, in parallel with the explosion of the gig economy in the last decade, we now see increasing demand for temporary or contract workers in most white-collar industries, not just the traditional area of office/administration roles.” Companies surveyed expected requirements for temp/contract talent to be highest across IT, engineering & life sciences, accountancy, and HR along with office/administration. Hiring on a temporary or contract basis gives organisations an opportunity to ‘try before you buy’ i.e. hiring initially on a temporary basis before converting to permanent. “Given companies’ uncertainty at present, this model is potentially a perfect solution that enables businesses to ramp up and meet demand while the future looks uncertain. At the same time, it enables jobseekers to find work quickly. In our corresponding survey of 3500 candidates, the majority said they were more likely to consider temp or contract work than before the COVID-19 pandemic struck,” says Rudden. Flexible labour in demand at polar ends of the economy; powering growth in recovering sectors and offering interim cover for harder hit sectors 91% of employers plan to expand contingent worker numbers as increasing uncertainty looms 82% of candidates would consider temp or contract positions if given more flexibility, like remote working Further, 82% of candidates said they would be more likely to consider temp or contract work if they were offered flexibility, such as remote working. This is significant change in attitude considering 60% of respondents had not worked in a temporary or contract capacity in the past two years. Rudden adds, “It likely not only reflects the impact of the current crisis in terms of people having lost employment but perhaps a wider acceptance that flexibility may be required as we move forward.” Whilst market uncertainty prevails, what is certain is that we are in the midst of an extended period of transformation in the workplace with blended workforces i.e. a mix of permanent and temp/contract staff perhaps becoming the norm. “Prior to COVID-19 there were already several examples of major multinationals with a significant proportion of staff engaged as agency temps or contractors. We predict an increase in such models being used by other businesses going forward,” says Rudden. For a copy of the report, contact Barry Rudden on +35314744612 or email brudden@sigmar.ie