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make cv stand out

Make Your CV Stand Out From The Crowd

make cv stand out

Wit industry and business booming in Ireland companies are flooded with job applications and CVs every day. The competition can be tough out there. Your CV is just a piece of paper telling the company what you are all about, but sometimes it is really the only thing that is stopping you from getting your foot in the door and getting to the next stage – the interview.

 

According to Recruit Ireland, content is king. Their advice is that ‘bells and whistles’ CVs might not always work and that often clean and simple CVs are the best.

 

Research by job-matching service The Ladders found that recruiters spend an average of six seconds reviewing your CV, stating ‘it’s important to make every second count’.

 

However, many people feel that innovative CVs will grab more attention. Ireland has seen some of these creative characters thinking outside the box. One of them is UCD graduate Jordan McDonnell, who posted his alternative style slideshow CV online. It quickly went viral, getting more than 90,000 views. He received job offers from around the world, but accepted a job as an account manager with Twitter in Dublin.

 

‘I’d worked in the finance sector, but I wanted a change of career into something more creative. I sent out traditional CVs, but as I had no experience or creative background, I wasn’t successful in getting interviews. I looked into some alternative style CVs and when I put mine together, it really was a last resort for me,’ he said.

 

‘It was a total shock when it went viral. I actually got the position I have today by my manager trawling through CVs and going on Twitter to tell people to stop sending in four-page-long CVs with spelling mistakes. Someone tweeted him my CV saying, ‘I don’t suppose this guy has any hope so!’, because my CV was 33 pages long. Anyway, he liked it and invited me in to meet him and he offered me a job.’ Jordan recommends being creative when applying for a job, saying: ‘Do something a little different, do something creative and something that is you – that should work.’

 

Féilim Mac An Iomaire is another Irish jobseeker who decided he wanted to get noticed. He took out a billboard ad, dubbing himself the ‘Jobless Paddy’. As a result, he landed a role at the Paddy Power betting company. In Ireland, #jobfairy is another resource people are using to advertise and seek jobs.

 

Whether you decide to be creative or simple, there is key advice not to be ignored when submitting a CV. Tara McMenamon, executive consultant in accountancy and finance with Sigmar Recruitment, said: ‘What matters is what the hirer thinks of your CV. His or her opinion will be made by comparing your CVs with the others he or she has received. So think about what the other “competitors” are likely tohave on their CVs.’

 

According to McMenamon, some of the golden rules are: use bullet points and use spelling and grammar check, make every effort to get your hands on a job spec for a vacancy and explain all gaps on your CV.

 

Irrelevant detail is a cardinal sin, says McMenamon. ‘Everything must be relevant to the job for which you are applying and you must remove anything that is not relevant as far as the reader is concerned,’ she said.‘The reader has absolutely no interest in what you have to offer to the world. He’s interested in the resource that he wants to buy for his company at this moment.’

 

Most importantly, she added ‘the job must be one that really interests you and you must have a realistic chance of winning it. Otherwise, you will be generating a CV for something that you cannot obtain.’

 

Posted by Ruth Tobin on 28 November 2017

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“K-shaped” Workforce Patterns Begin to Emerge with Major Spike in Flexi-labour

“K-shaped” Workforce Patterns Begin to Emerge with Major Spike in Flexi-labour

The latest data from Sigmar Recruitment’s Employer Sentiment Report suggests that most companies plan on hiring more contingent labour in order to deal with the extended market turbulence. Having surveyed 1000 Irish based companies, 91% of respondents said they are more likely to hire temps or contractors than before COVID-19. Commenting on the results, Barry Rudden, Director, Sigmar Recruitment says; “This may signify a fundamental shift in how workforces will be constituted moving forward as employers are wary of future market shocks. Whilst demand has rebounded since March, companies just don’t know how the market will react to a possible second wave of infections, topped with Brexit fears, so there are still challenges ahead for organisations and as a result they are hesitant to commit to permanent hires.” One third of all companies surveyed said it was likely or highly likely that they would increase the % of temp/contract staff they already engage. “This is the norm in early stages of an extended recovery. Seeing this trend emerge at polar ends of the labour market is indicative of a new K-Shaped labour market.” says Rudden. He adds; “When viewed, in parallel with the explosion of the gig economy in the last decade, we now see increasing demand for temporary or contract workers in most white-collar industries, not just the traditional area of office/administration roles.” Companies surveyed expected requirements for temp/contract talent to be highest across IT, engineering & life sciences, accountancy, and HR along with office/administration. Hiring on a temporary or contract basis gives organisations an opportunity to ‘try before you buy’ i.e. hiring initially on a temporary basis before converting to permanent. “Given companies’ uncertainty at present, this model is potentially a perfect solution that enables businesses to ramp up and meet demand while the future looks uncertain. At the same time, it enables jobseekers to find work quickly. In our corresponding survey of 3500 candidates, the majority said they were more likely to consider temp or contract work than before the COVID-19 pandemic struck,” says Rudden. Flexible labour in demand at polar ends of the economy; powering growth in recovering sectors and offering interim cover for harder hit sectors 91% of employers plan to expand contingent worker numbers as increasing uncertainty looms 82% of candidates would consider temp or contract positions if given more flexibility, like remote working Further, 82% of candidates said they would be more likely to consider temp or contract work if they were offered flexibility, such as remote working. This is significant change in attitude considering 60% of respondents had not worked in a temporary or contract capacity in the past two years. Rudden adds, “It likely not only reflects the impact of the current crisis in terms of people having lost employment but perhaps a wider acceptance that flexibility may be required as we move forward.” Whilst market uncertainty prevails, what is certain is that we are in the midst of an extended period of transformation in the workplace with blended workforces i.e. a mix of permanent and temp/contract staff perhaps becoming the norm. “Prior to COVID-19 there were already several examples of major multinationals with a significant proportion of staff engaged as agency temps or contractors. We predict an increase in such models being used by other businesses going forward,” says Rudden. For a copy of the report, contact Barry Rudden on +35314744612 or email brudden@sigmar.ie